[NL2-NL10] 56s from UTG2

    • Alficor1
      Alficor1
      Bronze
      Joined: 16.06.2010 Posts: 7,291
      Known players:
      Position:
      Stack
      SB:
      $6,55
      BB:
      $12,5
      Hero:
      $7,07
      MP1:
      $2,63
      MP2:
      $13,85
      MP3:
      $5,59
      CO:
      $3,96
      BU:
      $5,12

      0,02/0,05 No-Limit Hold'em (8 handed)
      Hand recorder used for this poker hand: Elephant 0.86 by www.pokerstrategy.com.

      Preflop: Hero is UTG2 with 6:heart: , 5:heart:
      Hero raises to $0,15, 5 folds, SB calls $0,13, BB folds.

      Flop: ($0,35) A:spade: , 6:club: , 5:spade: (2 players)
      SB bets $0,15, Hero raises to $0,45, SB calls $0,30.

      Turn: ($1,25) 7:heart: (2 players)
      SB checks, Hero bets $0,89, SB calls $0,89.

      River: ($3,03) 3:club: (2 players)
      SB bets $5,06 (All-In), Hero calls $5,06.

      Final Pot: $13,15

      Results follow (highlight to see):
      Hero shows (6h 5h)
      SB shows a straight, seven high (Ah 4h)

      SB wins with a straight, seven high (Ah 4h)


      I had a huge session, i really ran hot, so i played 56s from UTG2 for some reason.
      I think my call on the river was stupid. Actually the reason i made that call was that me and that guy were arguing in chat for some time, so i thought that he was just tilted or whatever..
  • 2 replies
    • pzhon
      pzhon
      Bronze
      Joined: 17.06.2010 Posts: 1,151
      Originally posted by Alficor1
      I had a huge session, i really ran hot, so i played 56s from UTG2 for some reason.
      This is a form of tilt. Some players loosen up when they lose, others loosen up when they win. Sometimes this cures the problem of being overly tight, and sometimes it exacerbates the problem of being too loose. Either way, you end up with situations you don't find comfortable, but you might learn from them.

      65s is not a crazy hand to raise, but if you normally do not raise it and it starts to look tempting, it might be time to take a break.

      I think my call on the river was stupid.
      It's not the worst call in the world, but when you see that action, a low two-pair hand is not going to be ahead very often. It is very hard for your opponent to get there with a bluffing hand, and few players will turn a made hand like AT or even 87 into a bluff. If he had a worse hand like AK, he would probably check-call or bet less.

      It's true that you won't often have better than 65, and folding would be exploitable against a very good player. However, typical opponents are not going to exploit that weakness, and you can simply fold when they push like that.

      By the way, your raise on the flop was small, 30 cents more into a pot of 65 cents on a drawy board. I think you can raise more, and an Ax hand will not fold. It will also let you get all-in by the river without overbetting much in case the board is safe and your opponent doesn't show more strength.

      Your opponent's call on the turn was fine. He had many outs: Any A, 8, 7, 4, or 3, for 16 outs. He doesn't even need any implied odds to call, and he is even better off if you will call some value bets.
    • MaestroOfZerg
      MaestroOfZerg
      Bronze
      Joined: 17.11.2008 Posts: 5,510
      Hi,

      Originally posted by pzhon
      Originally posted by Alficor1
      I had a huge session, i really ran hot, so i played 56s from UTG2 for some reason.
      This is a form of tilt. Some players loosen up when they lose, others loosen up when they win. Sometimes this cures the problem of being overly tight, and sometimes it exacerbates the problem of being too loose. Either way, you end up with situations you don't find comfortable, but you might learn from them.

      65s is not a crazy hand to raise, but if you normally do not raise it and it starts to look tempting, it might be time to take a break.

      I think my call on the river was stupid.
      It's not the worst call in the world, but when you see that action, a low two-pair hand is not going to be ahead very often. It is very hard for your opponent to get there with a bluffing hand, and few players will turn a made hand like AT or even 87 into a bluff. If he had a worse hand like AK, he would probably check-call or bet less.

      It's true that you won't often have better than 65, and folding would be exploitable against a very good player. However, typical opponents are not going to exploit that weakness, and you can simply fold when they push like that.

      By the way, your raise on the flop was small, 30 cents more into a pot of 65 cents on a drawy board. I think you can raise more, and an Ax hand will not fold. It will also let you get all-in by the river without overbetting much in case the board is safe and your opponent doesn't show more strength.

      Your opponent's call on the turn was fine. He had many outs: Any A, 8, 7, 4, or 3, for 16 outs. He doesn't even need any implied odds to call, and he is even better off if you will call some value bets.
      Not much to add, good job pzhon.