Going all-in against regulars/tight players postflop

    • Avatars91
      Avatars91
      Bronze
      Joined: 18.12.2009 Posts: 2,689
      What kind of a hand is good enough for playing for the entire stack postflop against a regular or simply a player who is not likely to 3bet postflop as a bluff?
      It is more or less clear that in such spots they usually have at least two pair or better so folding top pair with a good kicker or an overpair should be standard but what about two pair or a good draw? I just lost a hand with KQ top two pair on the turn with the board being something like KJ3Q with two spades. Lost against ATo that called my bet on the flop (not the best play probably) and shoved to my small 3bet on the turn.
  • 2 replies
    • Bliausmas
      Bliausmas
      Bronze
      Joined: 11.03.2010 Posts: 741
      It depends very much from your opponent IMHO, you cannot form a rule, like fold an overpair and definitely shove 2 pair. I sometimes face so nitty opponents that even when I shove with bottom set like hands, I know I'm crushed. But if you are facing good-ish regular - yeah, sometimes they do stupid plays. Calling with GS is one of them. My opinion would be - you must note your opponents down: either they are rock-nits (proceed with extreme caution against these), or they are just pretending to be good regulars.
    • Bierbaer
      Bierbaer
      Bronze
      Joined: 27.05.2005 Posts: 7,989
      Originally posted by Bliausmas
      It depends very much from your opponent IMHO, you cannot form a rule, like fold an overpair and definitely shove 2 pair. I sometimes face so nitty opponents that even when I shove with bottom set like hands, I know I'm crushed. But if you are facing good-ish regular - yeah, sometimes they do stupid plays. Calling with GS is one of them. My opinion would be - you must note your opponents down: either they are rock-nits (proceed with extreme caution against these), or they are just pretending to be good regulars.
      Agree with this.

      It totally depends on the opponent, the board structure, positions etc., so it's really impossible to make any general statements.