HEM EV line question

  • 4 replies
    • pzhon
      pzhon
      Bronze
      Joined: 17.06.2010 Posts: 1,151
      The red line is a better indicator of how well you are playing than the green line. It doesn't say whether you are getting your money in ahead or behind, or whether you need to work on your pushing game versus calling or the early levels.

      If you play very tightly and wait to get your money in ahead, this does not mean your red line will go up. If you are too tight, your red line will go down because you are playing badly. If you are looser, and make many pushes which will only get called by better hands, this does not mean your red line will go down (or up).
    • mhoppy
      mhoppy
      Bronze
      Joined: 10.01.2011 Posts: 4
      another quick question topic pzhon

      hand like J9 HU sng wiz says push opponent calls with q5 obviously lines going to go down but long term it'll go up? as most opponents fold.

      also guess that means its better to play a much tighter range at the lower stakes?
    • pzhon
      pzhon
      Bronze
      Joined: 17.06.2010 Posts: 1,151
      There is a consensus that players in lower stakes are looser. However, is that consensus backed by real data, or just anecdotal evidence? You will see some crazy calls in lower stakes games, but there are also bad folds you don't get to see from players who don't understand odds. You will run into more players who can't imagine that it would be correct to push as widely as the Nash equilibrium. That some players do not understand risk aversion, but they also put you on a tighter range, means that they do not always call looser in low stakes games, and if you tighten up too much out of fear of spite calls when your opponents are not making spite calls on average, then you will be playing badly.

      If Q5 is in the range you give your opponent for calling, and J9 is a push against that range, then your red line and green line will go up more in the long run if you push J9, even if you run into Q5 or AA that time.

      What should concern you is if you put your opponent on a tight calling range like 66+ A8s+ ATo+ KQs, and then you get called by Q5, and J9 was not a push against a wider range. If you get called 10% of the time, but it is a 10% range which includes a few junk hands like Q5, then pushing J9 will do even better than if you were called by the top 10%.
    • mhoppy
      mhoppy
      Bronze
      Joined: 10.01.2011 Posts: 4
      Yeah, your right in this instance it was based completely on observation, and i can see ive fallen into a trap of adjusting a person's hand range to include the likes of Q5, rather then as a random hand's when they've been shown by a player they did'nt appear to fit.

      I think you may have indirectly pointed out quite a few more problem's too not just with STT's. thanks pzhon!.