Pocket with an over on board

    • finsener
      finsener
      Bronze
      Joined: 08.07.2010 Posts: 13
      Imagine that you are the initial raiser holding a middle pocket, get cold-called and the flop brings an over to your pocket. What game plan do you take in position and out of position? Maybe you know a good guide somewhere about this?

      For example, you have a pair of tens, you get two callers and the flop brings a queen.

      If both players check to you and you c-bet, do you continue on turn after you get called by one of them?

      What if you are the first to speak after the flop. Check and see if opponents check also, then firing turn with a plan to fold if re-raised? Try and find out right there on flop?

      P.S.
      I guess this may be pretty trivial to you, but I don't remember learning about this and I am getting stuck in those situations, not doing anything really meaningful. I am often just checking my pair and letting someone catch an ace on the river, then paying for my stupidity with calling their little river bet too sweet to fold... :f_frown:
  • 3 replies
    • Hlynkinn
      Hlynkinn
      Bronze
      Joined: 14.06.2008 Posts: 4,998
      Matters so much on opponents, stack setups and board textures.

      I would advice you to just post bunch of similar spots to the hand evaluations and the judges will give you an answer about each spot and you'll soon enough get a good idea how to play in those spots...
    • pzhon
      pzhon
      Bronze
      Joined: 17.06.2010 Posts: 1,151
      There are a lot of ways to play this uncomfortable situation. You don't want to get too excited about a hand which can be beaten by one card, but second pair can be a decent hand.

      Don't automatically make a continuation bet. There are times to check behind or to check-fold, as well as to bet/call or bet/fold. If you don't make a continuation bet, this might not mean you are giving up on the hand. Sometimes the way to get value is to check the flop through to induce action from weaker hands.

      Don't always assume that a single opponent has any overcard. JJ is still a strong hand on a queen-high flop. However, if you are up against multiple opponents, and one makes a substantial bet and another calls or raises, it is usually time to fold.

      The number of overcards to your pair on the board matter. If there is only one overcard, then you might get some value from middle pair.

      Be more inclined to check-behind and then call the turn when you have a higher pair than a lower pair. It is easier for the lower pair to be outdrawn, while you may gain from letting undercards catch up. So, if the flop is A73r, and you have KK in position against one opponent, it's fine to check behind and hope someone with QJ will pair or will bluff on the turn. If you have 88, you should be more inclined to bet on the flop to fold out hands like QJ.
    • finsener
      finsener
      Bronze
      Joined: 08.07.2010 Posts: 13
      Hlyn, yes that's a good idea too.

      And pzhon, thank you for your strategy tips on that. Definitely makes sense. I hope I feel a little more comfortable next time with those in mind.