[NL2-NL10] Interesting Hands from 01/02 Adv. SSS Coaching

    • xarry2
      xarry2
      Bronze
      Joined: 02.01.2007 Posts: 834
      Sorry for beeing a bit late ;)


      Hand 1:

      Known players: (for a description of vp$ip, pfr, ats, folded bb, af, wts, wsd or hands click here)          
      keine.

      1/2 No-Limit Hold'em (10 handed)
      Hand recorder used for this poker hand: Texas Grabem 1.9 by www.pokerstrategy.com.

      Preflop: Hero is CO with K:spade: , A:club:
      UTG raises to $8.00, 4 folds, MP3 calls $8.00, Hero raises to $31.80 (All-In), 3 folds, UTG calls $24.80, MP3 folds.

      Flop: ($73.60) A:diamond: , 8:club: , T:club:
      Turn: ($73.60) 7:heart:
      River: ($73.60) 4:diamond:


      Final Pot: $73.60

      Against an UTGraise I'm not always reraising AKo. On many limits players are quite tight and their openraising range UTG is about AK/JJ. Against this range we only got 39.8% equity. Even against AQ/TT we've got a coinflip with 49.2% equity. That's why I don't like to reraise. Why should I play such tough spots with huge variance, where my overall win is almost zero?

      In this situation, however, we have got a coldcaller adding additional deadmoney into the pot.
      Let's see how much equity we need:

      Pot Odds for All-In Situation UTG vs. Hero:

      Pot: 31.8+8/31.8 = 1.25 : 1 i.e. we need 44,4% equity.

      In this situation I decided to make a play with AKo.
      Against a tight player its still a loss but since I had no reads I rather assume that he raises AQ in early. As long as he does this, we have more than enough equity to reraise profitably.

      So, take care of coldcallers adding deadmoney and whats more important, take care of your equity. The Chart tells us to reraise AK vs. any position.
      However, as adv sss player you should always consider your own equity against different positions (there we only can consider estimated ranges) and against different players (with stats/reads)



      Hand 2:


      Known players: (for a description of vp$ip, pfr, ats, folded bb, af, wts, wsd or hands click here)   
      Position:
      Stack
      MP3:
      $192.54
      Hero:
      $34.75
      BU:
      $252.75

      1/2 No-Limit Hold'em (6 handed)
      Hand recorder used for this poker hand: Texas Grabem 1.9 by www.pokerstrategy.com.

      Preflop: Hero is SB with 9:spade: , A:diamond:
      MP2 folds, MP3 calls $2.00, CO folds, BU calls $2.00, Hero raises to $34.75 (All-In), 3 folds.

      Final Pot: $40.75



      With these two hands I want to show how to play OOP when facing limper(s). In many situations we are facing a general problem: we are OOP and players limped before us. Making a raise now can lead us into serious problems. If we get called we will be OOP on the flop and what is even more important: we are OOP with a reststack which is often not much bigger than the pot on the flop. If we hit nothing we have to decide whether to make a direct push or play c/f.
      I often try to avoid this situation by making direct pushes preflop. If I have to commit more than 40% of my stack with a bet/raise I always push directly. OOP I often push directly I a raise commits more than one third of my stack (since then the pot will be bigger than my stack on the flop)
      This topic is very versatile, so I just can give some examples here.

      Important are: - our holdings
      - the players who limp
      - our stacksize

      In the first hand we have A9o. I prefer suited hands though, since If we will get called by a pp we will have a coinflip in most situations. In this situation A9o is good enough tough.
      MP3 is loose passive. This tells us 2 things: he limps many weak hands but he will often limp stronger hands since he’s to scared to raise them. If he would limp in early position I would probably make no push here without further reads. But open limps from late position are a huge sign of weakness. The same is for the BU. If he limps here instead of making a very profitable raise IP form the BU (as I play BSS too, I can tell that I would raise almost any playable hand here ;) he shows immense weakness.
      What could their holdings look like? Which hands are better than ours?
      MP3: 22-88 maybe 99. Ax-AT maybe AJ. Then he could have many SCs and some suited Kings and Queens.
      We see that we only have to fear 99 and AT/AJ. But the biggest part of his range is only a coinflip (as I said I like Axs more since we will have a good coinflip against pps) or we are favourite.
      Here I’don’t care about BU since he will even have worse hands as MP3. I treat his limp as deadmoney.

      I could think of a MP3 range like:
      99-22,AJs-A2s,K6s+,Q8s+,J9s+,T9s,98s,87s,76s,65s,AJo-A2o,K9o+,QTo+,JTo,T9o,98o,87o,76o,65o
      Maybe he is even looser. Against this range we have 57.7% equity. So we will always make profit here no matter what he does.

      I also take care of my stacksize. Of course it is more profitable to push with 12BB than with 25. (then we would often make a normal raise though).
      Here I’m risking 32.75$ to win 7$. Not too bad considering that we have preflop FE and a good equity when being called.

      An accurate calculation for this situation is very complicated but I can count on my evaluation of this situation (if it was wrong I have to make notes of course)

      Maybe I get called by MP3 with: 99-55,AJs-A5s,KTs+,QTs+,AJo-A7o,KTo+,QJo
      So he is folding about 50% of his range. Here I’m still in front btw.

      EV = 7$*0.5 +0.5[32.75$+7$*0.51 – 32.75$*0.49] = +5.6$
      So we’re making good profit. Of course we can modifiy many variables here. If MP3 calls looser our EV will increase and if he calls tighter we still make profit through his preflop folds (in addition our equity will almost never fall below 40%)
      If he only calls like 99-66,AJs-A8s,KQs,AJo-A9o,KQo he folds about 80% of his range and we have 42% equity.

      EV = 0.8*7$ + 0.3[32.75$+7$*0.42 – 32.75*0.58] = +4.91$

      It’s a bit less but we still make good profit.

      So, been quite long ;) I hope you got my points. The direct push enables us to play Hands (especially OOP) that would otherwise be very hard to play. Imagine a normal raise with A9 here!

      But try not only to push weak hands similarly. Its always to balance your play. So you should (at least sometimes) play your monster exactly the same way. Otherwise you would be readable very easy.



      If you want you can post your thoughts about this hand (just considering what I said before):
      What would you do here?


      SB is Pokerstrategy SSS player


      Known players: (for a description of vp$ip, pfr, ats, folded bb, af, wts, wsd or hands click here)       
      Position:
      Stack
      BU:
      $65
      Hero:
      $34.75
      SB:
      $35

      1/2 No-Limit Hold'em (10 handed)
      Hand recorder used for this poker hand: Texas Grabem 1.9 by www.pokerstrategy.com.

      Preflop: Hero is BB with 8:heart: , A:spade:
      7 folds, BU calls $2.00, SB calls $1.00, Hero ???

      Final Pot: $38.75
  • 3 replies
    • xylere
      xylere
      Bronze
      Joined: 27.05.2007 Posts: 2,939
      Just one thing to add about 1st hand:

      (to everyone) when you observe your opponent's statistics keep in mind that PT averages PFR from all positions, meaning that if opponent raises from UTG with PFR 10% - his actual PFR will be somewhat around 7,5%

      Last hand:

      SB is very strange, if I read his stats correctly he is very tight-agressive pre-flop and extremly loose-agressive postflop. His call (complete) from SB looks weak therefore. According to his stats he should have a low pocket or something like Ax-Kx. The Vpip from SB statistics might be helpfull here... a lot of tight players loosen up a lot from SB, in this case push is profitable.

      No reasons to mention that against BU's range you are likely way ahead.
    • xarry2
      xarry2
      Bronze
      Joined: 02.01.2007 Posts: 834
      SB is very tight aggressive since he is playing shortstack strategy as we do, too.
      So he just can't have a hand to call our All-In. I almost never see ps sss players making strange moves ;)
    • xylere
      xylere
      Bronze
      Joined: 27.05.2007 Posts: 2,939
      Originally posted by xarry2
      SB is very tight aggressive since he is playing shortstack strategy as we do, too.
      So he just can't have a hand to call our All-In. I almost never see ps sss players making strange moves ;)
      lol :D didn`t pay attention to his stack and confused wts with w$sd :D then its an easy all-in, of course)