how to deal with continuous raise / re-raise

    • Roya1flush
      Roya1flush
      Bronze
      Joined: 10.12.2007 Posts: 306
      ok i have a player sitting two seats to my left.. the dude keeps raising or re-raising now i know most proberbly his range of opening hands is not that tight, but the problem is i am not getting any hands to make a stand..

      I had AA busted to he had pocket 33 and hit the set on the turn..

      his stats from poker ace is:

      NL 50
      Stack: $257
      VP: 52
      PR: 39
      Hands: 162..

      I am just waiting for a strong hand and i am sure ill get paid off...
  • 9 replies
    • xylere
      xylere
      Bronze
      Joined: 27.05.2007 Posts: 2,939
      that`s all you can do - wait for a strong hand and prepare for worse) of course, try to get a sit to his left. on what pokerroom do you play?

      btw, there was a good article on Ps.com about dealing with maniacs.
    • aciddrop
      aciddrop
      Bronze
      Joined: 08.10.2006 Posts: 1,519
      I have played against two guys like this, and while they are definitely LAG, I wouldn't call them maniacs. They seem to know what they are doing, and win consistently. I couldn't beat them, as they are consistent with their behaviour.

      They are not to be confused with maniacs, who bet wildly and soon blow their bankrolls, even if taking some hands with their rubbish.

      The guys I mean raise aggressively, and take a lot of pots down as a result without even seeing a flop, because of people like me, who play tight.

      They call a raise almost everytime with their range, regardless of what it is, and float any flop. They bet into flops that will have missed my hand, because I have a very readable range, and take pots that way as well.

      And because of playing so many hands, they get lucky more often with weaker hands.

      It is very difficult to play them.
    • Kaitz20
      Kaitz20
      Bronze
      Joined: 02.02.2007 Posts: 27,343
      If the float a lot, you could consider check/re-raising flops:) , but better is just chose a better table:)
    • aanty2000
      aanty2000
      Bronze
      Joined: 22.10.2007 Posts: 484
      the player you are talking about here seems like a maniac but most of them (25/22 , 28/23 etc ) are not maniacs ... they are lose aggressive players and it s hard to play against them. you have to consider 4 beting lightly and calling them down lightly preflop ... but it is hard and is how the game is played higher >nl200 . the bad part is that you never know what good lag players have and they wont go to showdown without a good hand or draw most of the time
    • Nunki
      Nunki
      Bronze
      Joined: 25.10.2006 Posts: 865
      As Aciddrop says, some of these aggro players are good and some bad. It is important to understand whether the villain in question plays fast and loose just on early streets or whether he continues to speed on the turn and river when the bets get big. A villain whom appreciates position is more likely to be good.

      If the villain is good then you are better off on his left as this will automatically slow him down and cause him to play more straightforwardly against you. If he is bad and fires away too much on later streets then sitting on his right is best as it affords you not only relative position on the entire table but also enables you to let him bluff off his stack by checking your marginal (and strong) hands to him. High variance and high profit since you will sometimes have to pay the guy off on his legitimate hands. Some bad maniacs will tip their hand strength via bet-sizing tells.

      Not for the faint-hearted but here is a marginal hand from a couple of hours ago. Villain's aggression-frequency is > 60% on all 3 streets.


      Known players: (for a description of vp$ip, pfr, ats, folded bb, af, wts, wsd or hands click here)   
      Position:
      Stack
      MP3:
      $49.35
      Hero:
      $24.65

      0.10/0.25 No-Limit Hold'em (5 handed)
      Hand recorder used for this poker hand: Texas Grabem 1.8 by www.pokerstrategy.cc.

      Preflop: Hero is BU with 7:heart: , 7:spade:
      MP3 calls $0.25, CO folds, Hero raises to $1.25, 2 folds, MP3 calls $1.00.

      Flop: ($2.85) 8:spade: , T:heart: , 4:heart: (2 players)
      MP3 checks, Hero checks.

      Turn: ($2.85) 8:diamond: (2 players)
      MP3 bets $1.75, Hero calls $1.75.

      River: ($6.35) 6:diamond: (2 players)
      MP3 bets $3.35, Hero calls $3.35.

      Final Pot: $13.05

      Results follow (highlight to see):
      MP3 shows [ Jd, 5d ] a pair of Eights
      Hero shows [ 7h, 7s ] two pairs, Eights and Sevens
      Hero wins $12.40 USD with two pairs, Eights and Sevens.
    • xylere
      xylere
      Bronze
      Joined: 27.05.2007 Posts: 2,939
      well in the first post the guy has 52/39, I wouldn`t label him LAG.

      But anyway, in case of a LAG player I agree with Nunki. I don`t have much BSS experience, but from my point of view you should stay to his right, even if he is good. You`ll definitely have a huge edge by having a relative position. I guess this also means that marginal calls pre-flop are now +EV (in those spots were you are last to act)
    • aanty2000
      aanty2000
      Bronze
      Joined: 22.10.2007 Posts: 484
      yeah ... obviously it is very good to have position against a good player
    • xylere
      xylere
      Bronze
      Joined: 27.05.2007 Posts: 2,939
      sure, in heads up. I don`t pretend to be correct, but imo its better to have relative position on the table and use it against other bad players, then to use your absolute position to fight a good one.
    • aanty2000
      aanty2000
      Bronze
      Joined: 22.10.2007 Posts: 484
      bad players are the players where you take money from and with position advantage you can exploit them to the maximum ... but it is not so hard to take a donks money OOP . but is much harder playing against a good player OOP