w34z3l

  • 16 replies
    • SvenBe
      SvenBe
      Headadmin
      Headadmin
      Joined: 19.04.2006 Posts: 13,470
      no worries, of course everyone is allowed to jump in. If you are a little bit more experienced, how about exchanging your ideas and helping the real newbies in their threads & with their questions?
    • w34z3l
      w34z3l
      Coach
      Coach
      Joined: 03.08.2009 Posts: 13,321
      Originally posted by SvenBe
      no worries, of course everyone is allowed to jump in. If you are a little bit more experienced, how about exchanging your ideas and helping the real newbies in their threads & with their questions?
      Yup, I will definitely help out if I can too :)
    • w34z3l
      w34z3l
      Coach
      Coach
      Joined: 03.08.2009 Posts: 13,321
      Question 1: What is your motivation for playing poker? (Be as vague or specific as you want with this one, but try to think of all the reasons and elaborate on them.)

      The main reason is a simple one. I like games. I also love playing chess amongst other things. Money was initially a secondary motivation, and hopefully it still is only that; however it is the case that a large part of my income currently comes from poker. Hence I find myself playing even when not necessarily in the mood; I think of myself as a semi-pro in that respect.

      While I enjoy playing poker I wish to keep it in its place, secondary to my main profession which is music. I recently graduated from a music university, and poker has proved to be a nice earner until I have found a little more teaching/performing work.

      Question 2: What are your weaknesses when playing poker? (What are the mistakes you know you are doing during your games? Are you playing while tired? Are you tilting easily? Want to see the showdown too much? Write as many as you think are affecting you.)

      Perhaps my biggest weakness is mindset. I am generally not prone to serious tilt like some people are. This does not mean I am entirely incapable of monkey tilt along with it's associated behaviour i.e; the smashing of household objects, swearing, and shoving allin preflop with trash.

      It's more a....subtle... diminishing in my concentration and play-style if I'm running bad. Usually nothing too major, but it all affects win-rate. I also leave the tables feeling down if I've lost......I just hate losing, especially to fish. I'm sure the game shouldn't effect my mood in this way.......yet I see live professionals steaming ALL the time....

      As for my A game itself.....I don't think I have too many huge leaks (at least not leaks that are going to be exploited at <100nl ). I've been studying the game for several years, read countless articles/books and watched a ton of training videos from pretty much all of the major training sites

      However, it's also true that I've never left micro-stakes. The bottom line is I just don't feel comfortable with the amount of money involved playing higher than 25nl. This is despite the fact that I have been consistently beating the games over a huge sample (800k+). As soon as I have a decent roll for 50nl I generally cash a huge part of it out. I'm not sure if this will ever change, or even if I should want it to change. Hourly for 9 tabling 25nl + sweet RB deal is more than acceptable for me.

      In short, I think I have a strong understanding of strategy and the mathematics behind the game, but I certainly have psychological issues especially where money is concerned.


      Question 3: What does it mean to play tight-aggressive? (Describe in your own words what playing tight aggressive is, and why does it work.)

      Tight-aggressive. Selective with the starting hands (Tight), and when you play , you play aggressively; in general preferring to bet/raise rather than check/call (Aggressive).

      It works because you generally have an equity edge when entering pots vs looser players and will make money at showdown (Tight). You also generate the most fold-equity/protection/value vs drawing hands and therefore win more money on average (Aggressive).

      The ideal however is to be a "thinking-TAG" or "LAG-TAG". For example 25o is typically not a BU open in a standard TAG range, but the play doesn't need to be considered "loose" if you know both blinds are folding a certain % over a large sample and not adjusting. There are also of course plenty of spots vs certain players where being passive has a much higher expectation than being aggressive so "TAG" is perhaps somewhat a misnomer in that sense.
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Hello w34z3l,

      I would say the same that everyone is welcome who-ever wants to join. :) Maybe want to intro your play. What kind of limits you play, or variant of poker?

      About the chess players I'd say that so many have switched to poker, mostly for one reason that with poker you can as well earn money. But of course it's not the main thing, you still get competition, trying to base on opponents, on their moves, etc. So practically it's almost the same as chess.

      Curious if you listen to music while you play? :D

      As I understand that you don't tilt that much but I'd still give you a small advice:
      Easiest wait to fight against tilt is to set up stop-loss technique. Which means if you for example have lost more than 3BIs for a session then you just stop the session for some time. The BI amount is set up from your own wanting. Some may put it higher, some lower. And after the stop you can easily just spend some time with evaluating your play.

      Best regards.
    • w34z3l
      w34z3l
      Coach
      Coach
      Joined: 03.08.2009 Posts: 13,321
      Originally posted by veriz
      What kind of limits you play, or variant of poker?
      I play 6max NLHE mainly anywhere between 2nl and 50nl. I do also like to play a little PLO8 now and again, but not too seriously.

      Originally posted by veriz
      Curious if you listen to music while you play? :D
      Occasionally yes! I do actually find music helps to maintain a positive mindset and is not distracting. I find watching films and reading forum threads to be -EV though so I typically avoid that.

      Originally posted by veriz
      Easiest wait to fight against tilt is to set up stop-loss technique.
      Cheers for the advice....I've experimented with it a little bit but find it hard to fathom. For example what if you are playing A-game but get coolered out of your 3BI stop loss limit, should you still stop? Or what if you are down 3bi in EV but you are actually in profit?

      I lucked out and won the PS raffle for Jared Tendlers book so I've read that to help with a few mindset issues aswell.
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      With stop-less the case is that you can always change it. For some it might be better only 2BIs, some may use even 5BIs. Simple can set it up yourself and how you feel.
    • w34z3l
      w34z3l
      Coach
      Coach
      Joined: 03.08.2009 Posts: 13,321
      Question 1: What do you think you could play differently than how it is in the BSS Starting Hands Chart, and why?

      The starting hands chart is only a guide and should be treated as such. Following the chart to the letter will not automatically result in you becoming a winning player. Postflop hand-reading skills are also required.

      There are no problems with the starting hand chart, the key is to understand where you can deviate from it and why. Here are a just a few of the principles you might take into consideration -

      Button steals - If both blinds fold to a steal 80% of the time or more you can mathematically open any hand on BU (3x) and make a profit, even if you give up 100% of the time postflop.

      Light 3bets - The SHC only advocates value 3bets, while it is perfectly acceptable to include some bluffs especially vs late position openers if ft3bet stat is sufficiently high.

      Stack sizes - The SHC doen't not specify stack sizes which are a huge factor to take into consideration. In general you can play a wider range if the stacks are deep, but may choose to tighten up if there are short stacks in position on you

      Implied odds - Vs bad-aggressive or calling-stations you can play a wider range as you have increased chances of a nice payout with a slightly weaker hand. Your implied odds also increase as the stack sizes increase. This then decreases the value of hands that suffer from reverse-implieds such as TPTK hands, so SPRs (stack:pot) become a factor in whether you should re-raise or flat in some spots.

      Steal equity - You can play a wider range if you know you have decent fold equity. For example the SHC advises folding SC in position to a raise - these are easily playable if you know you will have good opportunities to steal postflop vs a specific player.

      Player types - The key concept on which most deviations from the SHC are based. For example, you may decide to tighten up your BU flatting range if you know there are light squeezers at the table; or begin to flat some trap-hands which are standard raises according to the SHC.

      In short, the SHC provides a solid tight-aggressive model, but there is room for huge deviation depending on the table/players. Once a dynamic/meta-game has been established this allows for further deviation; to the point where you can literally be playing any 2 from any spot if you have a solid enough reason (albeit rare at the micro stakes).

      Question 2: Post a hand for evaluation where you have a question regarding your pre-flop play.

      AKo in SB vs UTG/open + callers

      Question 3: What is the equity of AKo against the top 5% range? 5% means: 88+, AJs+, KQs, AKo?

      46.324%
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good job! Homework #2 Done!

      It seems that you already have a an edge on other students while knowing a lot of theory and of course have practiced yourself that.

      The case with SCs is that a lot of people underestimate the hand. Some may even think that some AXs hands are even better, although they aren't. That's totally true that SCs have very good implied odds postflop and we can even take stabs on many different boards with just a draw and sometimes even take down it. Although usually with SCs it's better to be IP and of course know rather against known opponents.

      Hopefully you enjoy the School so far. Some more points earned.
    • w34z3l
      w34z3l
      Coach
      Coach
      Joined: 03.08.2009 Posts: 13,321
      Thanks for your replies, I am enjoying the school so far.
    • w34z3l
      w34z3l
      Coach
      Coach
      Joined: 03.08.2009 Posts: 13,321
      Question 1: You are holding KsQs. What is your preflop equity against an opponent who has 3d3c? How does the equity change on the following flop: Js5d3s?

      K:sQ vs 3:d3 ----> K:sQ has 50.780% equity

      On J:s5:d3 flop -----> K:sQ has 26.465% equity

      Question 2:

      In terms of direct pot odds hero needs 19.4% (91:22 ---> 22/113) equity to make the call. Villain's range for min-raising the turn is typically strong, containing 2-pair, straights, and sets. It's true he may have some semi-bluffs such as 7:c8 or T:cQ as hero is not necessarily repping strength, (perhaps villain even has a misplayed overpair); but in general it is prudent to heavily discount any Ace or Jack outs.

      Hero has therefore 9 flush outs, 7 of which are to the nuts. 6 and 3 are tainted but villain usually bets the flop with any set or two pair so these can be removed from villain's range a reasonable aount, unless the turn improved him. Any flopped 2 pair is also very unlikely to be in villain's preflop flatting range.

      It makes sense to estimate that hero has 9 good outs. Using 2* rule, this equates to roughly 18% equity, almost enough to make the call on pot-odds alone. However, villain has $1.48 behind giving hero some implied odds which is what really makes a call profitable. It is likely villain has a strong hand which may have difficulty folding should hero hit his flush. Hero has sufficient implied odds to call.

      Question 3

      3bet pot, c/r turn as bluff
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good job! Homework #3 Done!

      About Question #3:
      There are few situations on turn:
      a) If we take just odds for the FD and we take into account that all our odds are clean. There which means:
      Total Pot = $0,91 ; We have to Call = $0,22 -> According to that it means we are getting ~4,16:1 odds. For flushdraw we would need 4:1. Which tells us that we are getting perfect odds.
      b) If we consider the opponent having sets here:
      Which means we have to discount outs, for example 6 and also 3. Which means we have 7 clean outs. Which means that we need 6:1 odds. That tells us that we need ~$0,41 on river to make it profitable. If we expect the opponent being loose enough and being able to pay us no-matter what then we can do the Call here properly.
      c) We might even have overcards as outs or even 4 as a out:
      Although this kind of situation ain't that likely. I'd rather discount that one and either pick a) or b). Most likely towards Call.

      You are doing great progress! Some more points earned.
    • w34z3l
      w34z3l
      Coach
      Coach
      Joined: 03.08.2009 Posts: 13,321
      Yeah 2* rule isn't accurate, so technically 20% (4:1) equity with a flush draw.

      Even if you get exactly the odds you need, it's the implieds that make you the money. Presumably if you get exactly the pot odds you need and 0 implieds, you could fold for variance sake as the play is break-even.

      It seems you were pretty much saying the same things as me.....anyway, thanks for response!
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Rule 2* is accurate. Since I did discount the 2 outs of FD. :) Which means we have 7 outs which is 6:1 odds.
    • w34z3l
      w34z3l
      Coach
      Coach
      Joined: 03.08.2009 Posts: 13,321
      Originally posted by veriz
      Rule 2* is accurate. Since I did discount the 2 outs of FD. :) Which means we have 7 outs which is 6:1 odds.
      With 9 outs that gives 18% by the 2* rule, but according to the chart you have 20%. Therefore the 2* rule is out by 2% when you have 9 outs (as would be expected for an estimate). (You need 19.4% equity to call so this minor discrepancy actually makes the difference between having direct odds and not having direct odds, which is why I mentioned it)

      I realise 6:1 is the discounted fd outs, but given the fact villain has very few 2pair/sets hands in his range (and sometimes clean A+J outs) I deemed 9 to be a far more realistic estimate.

      If you get precisely the odds needed to call, this simply means you will break-even in the long-run. It's the implied-odds that are necessary to make long-term money in this spot (whether you discount fd outs or not).

      Thanks for the responses, but not convinced you are reading/understanding what I am saying ;) .
    • w34z3l
      w34z3l
      Coach
      Coach
      Joined: 03.08.2009 Posts: 13,321
      Question 1: Post a hand for evaluation where you have the initiative post-flop.

      AA vs CO flat-3bet

      Question 2: Evaluate one of the hands submitted by other members.

      Nl10 Sh 22
      Nl10 Sh Aa
      NL10 SH river raise
      NL10 SH A9o
      Nl10 SH TT SB

      Question 3: You are on the flop with K:sQ. The board cards are J, 9, 8, and your opponent holds 7:c7. What is your equity in this spot?

      K:sQ has 41.414% equity
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good job! Homework #4 Done!

      This weeks homework was a bit easier. But the idea of that is to help you go through last weeks stuff if you didn't go through everything. Or either way maybe even read some more articles, watch some videos and of course attend in the coaching. What will also help for your game is the evaluation part of other members hands and of course posting your own hands.

      Although you took advantage and used the Hand Evaluation forums at maximum need. :) Well done!

      Hopefully this wasn't too easy homework for you. Some more points earned.