faronel

    • faronel
      faronel
      Bronze
      Joined: 13.07.2011 Posts: 1,186
      Hi,

      First of all, I would like to express my gratitude to PokerStrategy.com and the people behind this educational project. Thank you and I hope it will be a true edutainment* for all of us!

      About me (off poker):
      It may sound corny (and probably is), but I think that learning to know me in a process is more interesting than just reading the same information about me. :)

      About me (in poker):
      I have been playing poker for about four years now, however, never at the competitive level. My experience was limited to an over-aggressive home game against NL50-200 regulars (some of them even with poker room PRO contracts) and some local mini-MTT (up to 2-3 tables) tournaments. In tournaments, I manage to gain a marginal but still positive ROI. In cash game, well... :f_p:

      Expectations:
      Recently, I got staked by a very good friend of mine who is a solid poker player. I still have some doubts in my potential, but he thinks that with effort and dedication, I can become a winning player (at least starting at the micro limits).
      All I can do is try my best. This educational project seems like just the right place to start with this.


      * a fictional word that describes a combination of education and entertainment.
  • 23 replies
    • IngridN
      IngridN
      Bronze
      Joined: 02.03.2011 Posts: 12,162
      Hi faronel,

      Welcome to our Beginners Course :)

      wishing you best of luck with your studies and keep us updated!

      Ingrid
    • faronel
      faronel
      Bronze
      Joined: 13.07.2011 Posts: 1,186
      Question 1: What is your motivation for playing poker? (Be as vague or specific as you want with this one, but try to think of all the reasons and elaborate on them.)

      I am not sure if it sounds clear, but ever since I was introduced to poker, I have always been interested in it, but never motivated to play the game. I guess, it will be easier to elaborate on the matter and make myself clear, if we use a concept of outer-inner motivation.
      Outer motivation is a set of incentives that provide some circumstancial benefit. In other words, the reward is coming from the outside, and often, in terms of interpersonal (social) or physical (material) gain. For example, in poker, those incentives would be a potential monetary gain ($$$), a fun pastime activity (with a lot of tilt included, but still fun!), and some appraisal by peers if you become better. This is what is appealing about poker, what makes me being interested in it. However, these are short-term bonuses that usually fade away quickly.
      On the other hand, inner motivation stands more for a personal psychological gratification. In my opinion, two best examples regarding poker and inner motivation, would be: a) self-actualization, i.e. finding an activity that you can excel at; b) self-satisfaction, as a result of point "a", you may reach the level of greater personal satisfaction (e.g. higher self-esteem). Now, for some reason I can't get around the idea that poker and I don't really match. There are probably many reasons to that, but I would point out one: it's a reinforced idea of being unable to get invloved more seriously with poker and produce positive results over the period of four years. Silly, but this basic stuff is what psychology is all about. I would like to think of this beginners' course as of a cognitive-behavioral therapy session where I will try to challenge this irrational thought by trying harder and producing (even slightly) better results. If that works, I just might not only be interested in, but also be motivated to play poker.

      Question 2: What are your weaknesses when playing poker? (What are the mistakes you know you are doing during your games? Are you playing while tired? Are you tilting easily? Want to see the showdown too much? Write as many as you think are affecting you.)

      I might be nitpicking, but asking someone about his or her abilities, by making a sole emphasis on the explicitly expressed negativity, has two downsides:
      1. A respondent can experience hostile attitude, which in result might produce only vague and incomplete answers.
      2. Even though respondents sometimes tend to exaggerate with their positive sides, they still are able to provide some genuine and crucial strengths. An experienced and wise teacher (whoever will review the answer) can point those out and guide a respondent towards building a better game around the strong side. I think it's understandable that in everything a key to success is to account for both, the aknowledgement of your weaknesses and the improvement of your strength.
      In the best traditions of motivational interviewing, there should be two questions First, "what are your positives sides when playing poker?" Followed by, "what are your less positive sides when playing poker?"

      However, I will agree with the possibility that I might be wrong about what I noted, those were just my two cents. Also, in respect to this project and the person who will review my answers, here is my answer to the question asked:
      * Lack of true motivation (i.e. not being motivated enough, as outlined at the beginning of the homework).
      * I would dare to say that I am quite impulsive, especially at the poker table. There are five main features of impulsivity, but I will mention two. First, I find it hard to concentrate on a poker game when I play it. I get carried away by different thoughts, short-term dreams and so on. In result, I miss out a lot of crucial table information (reads, opponent styles and their "playbook"). This way I don't have an edge over my opponents in any given hand. Second, while experiencing a negative emotion (e.g. anger or sadness after a lost big pot), I tend to become more spontaneous in my decisions. Instead of focusing on prospective results, I want to make myself feel better right now, right here - to make this feeling go away. Heuristic ideas lead to a conclusive "let's gamble". My poker friends seen me many times quickly donating the leftover of my stack or getting a really lucky double up with a truly mediocre hand after a big loss. This is a leak.
      * The poker knowledge. I know a lot about poker in general. Heck, I can have an elaborate discussion about poker for hours, even with an experienced poker player. It's a result of being involved as a listener or as a random commentator in poker discussions among poker pros (i.e. our live home games include NL50-200 regulars). But that knowledge is not organized, it's just fragments of a little of this and a little of that. Hence, a critical flaw at the very fundament of my entire poker knowledge. I need to start from the very basics, re-organize my thinking into one logical poker mindset. Easy said, right?

      Question 3: What does it mean to play tight-aggressive? (Describe in your own words what playing tight aggressive is, and why does it work.)

      Shortly, being tight means playing less hands but strong ones that gives you usually a better equity against a random opponent in a random hand. Being aggressive means taking initiative which usually forces players to become more passive against you, and in result, give up easier. When tight and aggressive are combined [and transforming the mathematical basis of the concept into some corny saying], you rule the game, and you have the force to support it.
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Hello faronel,

      Question #1
      The reason for having huge motivation might be the lack of huge winnings. Since if you would have huge winnings and some luck for example even in tourneys or cash games you will definitely be up for more and more play.

      About your outer motivation I'd say that tilting is kinda standard for everyone who isn't used to grind for longer time. Those who get more used to poker they will most likely get less titly. Why? Just they have gone through a lot of bad beats and the more you get them the more you will start to understand that it's just part of poker and without it you can't play. Bad-beats will always be in poker, no matter what.

      For some poker might be fun and they even can't stop playing. But that's actually a sign of weakness since if you want to play too much and can't even stop playing then it practically means that you will be playing while you might play just your C-game and being on tilt. Which of course you wont even realize. You will continue till you are busto. But in your case it's the opposite, as I understand from your text that you are still able to stop when you need to and can set the stop-loss which is actually very important in poker. That you have to find a critical spot where you gonna stop for some time and then come back and continue playing. Why? Because every bad mood needs to be removed, either doing any other activities or even just watching movies from PC, listening to music, etc.

      Question #2
      Even if the answers are incomplete which definitely will happen. Some are more critical about themselves some ain't. But still they will at least try to give some overview and definitely will realize some of their mistakes. Proven with last school project. Worked very well and everyone had at least some leaks which we managed to find.

      I do agree that we should add the positive sides into the question-list. But? Why we didn't is that people are gonna concentrate too much on just the positives while maybe just writing only few into negatives. As I understand from your point is that with asking both questions we don't offend them by asking only negative sides.

      *lack of motivation* - try setting some goals which you have to achieve and then try to stick to them. Usually those people who lack of motivation need just some push from either someone else or you have to set rules for yourself. Goals are the best for that. If you want I could even find a guy from previous School who had the same system where he even mentioned in his goals/to-do: mow the lawn, wash his car, repair some stuff, etc. Also of course poker goals, like playing specific number of hands, trying to reach Gold status in PokerStrategy, etc.

      *not paying much attention on tables* - do you think any good chess player or any other game they start being very good? I mean even in chess you can't predict that many moves. Also in basketball, they just have to practice a lot for being good. That's the same in poker, you can't become very good on tables with just have played some 10k hands. You have to practice that for longer time and trying everyday become better, learning something new, find some group for discussing (like this poker course) and many other things. Everything needs time.

      For some the easiest steps are even hard. :) Like one of the guys who came into this school and saw the 1st Podcast of the coaching said like oh this ain't for me. But I am pretty sure that in every school you could learn something. Like we had the exam part, the very 1st 16 questions were way to easy for everyone. But when came the math part which even nobody got 100% correct answers. ;) That said we see that everywhere we can learn something, even if we do very beginner stuff. Nobody forces you to learn beginner stuff, you can always arrange your discussion yourself at what level you want it. The same is even in our coachings. Some even mentioned that "please could we keep it in beginner level". But what can I do? I am trying to answer all the questions. :D

      Welcome to the Course and Good luck! First points earned.
    • faronel
      faronel
      Bronze
      Joined: 13.07.2011 Posts: 1,186
      I appreciate the feedback. Some additiona thoughts:

      * About not earning a bigger amount of money.
      I agree that if I made a reasonable profit by playing poker, I would probably be more motivated to play the game. Though, a note of caution. In my case, the higher motivation would be still based on the outer incentive, and thus, usually temporary.

      * About setting goals:
      People are usually good at achieving their goals when the goals are higher than average, and they have higher expectations.
      The "height" of a goal determines the perception of the goal's value. If the goal is too high, it will be deemed as unrealistic, thus, quickly abandoned. If the goal is too low, it will be deemed as pointless, thus, again, quickly abandoned. In my case, the goals actually are higher than average (realistic but reasonably hard to be achieved), like 1) a certain hand/hour volume per month; 2) achieving a realistic winrate at the microlimit etc. I am inclined to believe that I am pretty good at setting up some reasonable goals.
      However, the level of expectation towards a goal determines how much one believes in being capable of achieving the goal in general. If the expectation is very high, a person usually would fail due to the lack of serious commitment. If the expectation is too low, a person will usually fail due to the lack of self-belief. My problem is the very last point. I have little faith in achieving those goals.

      * About reading tables. I think you misunderstood what I tried to say here. I was not whining about being a bad table reader, rather saying that I have a hard time to concentrate on any read during a game. Be it a solid read or some bull's crap, for that matter. I am just "not in the game, I am somewhere else". It's like I don't even care about what is going on at that table...
      I would like to believe that with time (and experience) I would become better at noticing solid reads even just by looking at the play. However, I am also worried that I may remain as absent-minded as I am now, even when I become better in general. Thus, still missing some crucial intel.
      I think I know how to explain this lower attention span, but it's not a topic of open discussion. :)
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Nah, I did understand you but what I wanted to point out is that everything comes with time. You can't jump 10steps ahead with just thinking that you are able to do that or someone else is able to do that. Do you think Michael Jordan did just become a good basketball player because he is Michael Jordan? :D He also invested A LOT of time into basketball, long nights playing his favorite game.
    • faronel
      faronel
      Bronze
      Joined: 13.07.2011 Posts: 1,186
      Huh, seems like I am a typical student who just loves to procrastinate. But hey, better late than never, and so we are here for the 2nd homework... =)

      Question 1: What do you think you could play differently than suggested in the BSS Starting Hands Chart and why? (Are there any hands you would play differently? Do you have a problem or question about how a specific hand or hands should be played?)

      The chart is made up for a clearly conservative play, even a bit more conservative than a traditional TAG style. If a player feels more comfortable at micro limits, the player can expand the range. My suggestions would be:

      * Chart's proposal: 99-22 fold on EP, call the rest (and call 20).
      - My proposal: Fold 22-55 on EP, raise with 66-AA from EP to SB. Should be more careful vs 3bets, but hides better set mining and have more potential at getting paid off postflop if set is hit.

      * Chart's proposal: AQs fold on EP
      - My proposal: if table is tight (i.e. you have 3-5 opponents behind you that are likely to fold your raise), then can consider raising with AQs on EP.

      * Chart's proposal: suited boardway fold to late position (if noone called)
      - My proposal: consider raising on MP2/MP3, if the opponents behind (on CO, BTN) are tight. Basically, highjicking their position while we have good fold equity vs them.

      * Chart's proposal: fold suited broadways, Axs, suited connectors and AT-AQ, if there is one raise infront of you.
      - Consider calling, if raise is very small (like min raise). We still get great odds and we are IP. Of course, should consider our position vs the rest of the table, type of players etc.

      I think there are more, but that's what came into my mind off hand.

      Question 2: Do you have questions about your preflop play? Post your hand for evaluation. ( Post your hand in the Hand evaluation forums and provide a link to your hand in your private thread in the Locker Room.)

      Not at this very moment, but I do post hands regularly.

      Question 3: What is the equity of AKo against the top 5% range? 5% means 88+, AJs+, KQs, AKo. ( You can either calculate this yourself or use an equity calculator such as the PokerStrategy.com Equilab.)

      Equity Win Tie
      MP2 53.68% 45.27% 8.41% 88+, AJs+, KQs, AKo
      MP3 46.32% 37.92% 8.41% AdKh
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good job! Homework #2 Done!

      - My proposal: Fold 22-55 on EP, raise with 66-AA from EP to SB. Should be more careful vs 3bets, but hides better set mining and have more potential at getting paid off postflop if set is hit.

      Not only that but you can also take down the pot either preflop which happens time to time or you can just CB the flop and take down the pot there while you have the initiative. So definitely agree with your thoughts.

      - My proposal: if table is tight (i.e. you have 3-5 opponents behind you that are likely to fold your raise), then can consider raising with AQs on EP.

      That mainly depends on your postflop skills, with more knowledge we could even consider raising not only AQs but also AQo. You just have to be aware of playing such hands OOP and know what you going to do with them.

      - My proposal: consider raising on MP2/MP3, if the opponents behind (on CO, BTN) are tight. Basically, highjicking their position while we have good fold equity vs them.

      Totally agree, those hands are great to play postflop and usually have also possibility to hit bigger while for example small suited connectors are more difficult to handle cause they can't hit a bigger pair.

      - Consider calling, if raise is very small (like min raise). We still get great odds and we are IP. Of course, should consider our position vs the rest of the table, type of players etc.

      Once again, depends a lot on your postflop skills. With position we could even argue about playing those hands by cold calling and playing against known opponents. Cause those hands are perfectly well made for that. Especially if you have loose opponents behind you who join in the pot.

      About Question #3:

             Equity     Win     Tie
      UTG    46.32%  37.92%   8.41% { AKo }
      UTG+1  53.68%  45.27%   8.41% { 88+, AJs+, KQs, AKo }

      Hopefully you enjoy the Course so far.
    • faronel
      faronel
      Bronze
      Joined: 13.07.2011 Posts: 1,186
      Question 1: You are holding K :spade: Q :spade: . What is your preflop equity against an opponent who has 3 :diamond: 3 :club: ? How does the equity change on this flop: J :spade: 5 :diamond: 3 :spade: ? (Tip: you can use the Equilab to help you with this task.)

      a) For preflop equity my guess without using Equilab was 50-50, since it's a "coinflip". Equilab said:
      Equity Win Tie
      UTG+2 49.22% 48.84% 0.38% 3d3c
      MP1 50.78% 50.40% 0.38% KsQs
      b) For postflop, my guess without using Equilab was something like 30-70, since villain hit his set, which means K-Q doesn't improve our hand and we need to discount one flush out (5 :spade:) . Equilab said:
      Equity Win Tie
      UTG+2 73.54% 73.54% 0.00% 3d3c
      MP1 26.46% 26.46% 0.00% KsQs

      All in all, I guessed the rough equity estimate. =)

      Question 2: What would you do in the following hand? (Remember that it is important to explain your reasons, simply posting "Fold" or "Call" isn't enough!)

      No Limit hold'em $2 (9-handed)

      Players and stacks:
      UTG: $2.00
      UTG+1: $2.08
      MP1: $1.92
      MP2: $1.00
      MP3: $3.06
      CO: (Hero) $2.08
      BU: $2.00
      SB: $2.00
      BB: $1.24

      Preflop: Hero is CO with A :club: J :club:
      5 folds, Hero raises to $0.08, BU calls $0.08, SB folds, BB calls $0.06.

      Flop: ($0.25) 2 :club: 6 :diamond: 3 :diamond: (3 players)
      BB checks, Hero checks, BU checks.

      Turn: ($0.25) 5 :club: (3 players)
      BB checks, Hero bets $0.22, BU raises to $0.44, BB folds, Hero...?


      Preflop:
      Standard raise, nothing to add

      Flop:
      Multiway, hero missed, OOP vs BTN who is yet to act, dangerous drawy board - so check is totally fine here, and even fold, if BTN bets.

      Turn:
      BB showed great weakness on both streets. With set, BB should have bet on turn, after everyone checked behind on flop. So, most likely BB just missed his hand and is willing to give up, by checking it again on turn.
      Now, it is hero's turn who has a decision: to check it to BTN and see what BTN does or to lead out for fold equity and maybe if called, flush complete on river. Hero decided to lead out and gets min raised by BTN (after which BB folds as estimated).
      Question is: what does BTN raise us with here? If BTN hit his set on flop, why didn't he lead out there? Too drawy board, BTN would have to protect it on flop vs two players. Especially after everyone checked, why give free card. So, I am inclined to believe that BTN doesn't have 22, 33 or 66. But that 5 on the turn somehow gave BTN a courage to raise. How did that 5 help BTN? My suggestions would be:
      a) 44 - thus completing straight
      b) 55 - completing set
      c) A4 - completing straight
      d) If bad player, then maybe K :club: high suited broadway with second nut flush draw, but not likely.
      In any of the scenarios,
      pot odds are 2,13:1,
      our odds depend on villain's hand, but with a rough range estimate, I would include only not-pairing river flush draw and make it 5,5:1.
      Implied odds - we would need villain to pay us at least $0.90 on river, so our call would be justified. But we are OOP (meaning that villain might fold on our donk or check behind if third club lands), so I am inclined to think that we won't get these implied odds.

      So, hero should fold...



      Question 3: Do you have questions about your postflop play? Post your hand for evaluation. (Post your hand in the hand evaluation forum and provide a link to your hand in your private thread in the Locker Room.)

      I am posting hands regularly at HE forum section, so no question to be asked here. :)
    • faronel
      faronel
      Bronze
      Joined: 13.07.2011 Posts: 1,186
      Question 1: Post a hand for evaluation in which you have the initiative postflop. (Post your hand in the Hand evaluation board, and provide a link to your hand in your private thread.)

      A hand to evaluate

      Question 2: Evaluate one of the hands submitted by other members. (Choose a hand from the Hand evaluation board and post your own evaluation in the thread. Post a link to the hand you have evaluated in your private thread. You can evaluate as many hands as you want, but try to choose hands not yet evaluated by other users.)

      Me evaluating a random hand


      Question 3: You are on the flop with K :spade: Q :diamond: . The board cards are J :spade: , 9 :club: , 8 :heart: , and your opponent holds 7 :club: 7 :heart: . What is your equity in this spot?

      Without Equilab I guessed 42%. With Equilab:


      Equity Win Tie
      MP2 41.41% 41.41% 0.00% KsQd
      MP3 58.59% 58.59% 0.00% 7h7c
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good job! Homework #3 Done!

      About Question #1:
      Preflop Equity:

      Equity Win Tie
      UTG 50.78% 50.40% 0.38% { KsQs }
      UTG+1 49.22% 48.84% 0.38% { 3d3c }


      Postflop Equity:

      Board: J:spade: 5:diamond: 3:spade:
      Equity Win Tie
      UTG 26.46% 26.46% 0.00% { KsQs }
      UTG+1 73.54% 73.54% 0.00% { 3d3c }


      About Question #2:
      There are several occasions on turn:
      a) If we take just odds for the FD and we take into account that all our odds are clean. Which means:
      Total Pot = $0,91 ; We have to Call = $0,22 -> According to that it means we are getting ~4,16:1 odds. For flushdraw we would need 4:1. Which tells us that we are getting perfect odds.
      b) If we consider the opponent having sets here:
      Which means we have to discount outs, for example 6 and also 3. Which means we have 7 clean outs so that means we need 6:1 odds. That tells us that we need ~$0,41 on river to make it profitable. If we expect the opponent being loose enough and being able to pay us no-matter what then we can do the Call here properly.
      c) We might even have overcards as outs or even 4 as a out:
      Although this kind of situation ain't that likely. I'd rather discount that one and either pick a) or b). Most likely towards Call.

      You are doing great progress, keep going!
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good job! Homework #4 Done!

      This weeks homework was a bit easier. But the idea of that is to help you go through last weeks stuff if you didn't go through everything. Or either way maybe even read some more articles, watch some videos and of course attend in the coaching. What will also help for your game is the evaluation part of other members hands and of course posting your own hands.

      If you have interests you could try calculating the equity with a formula which you can use even on tables(either playing online or live poker):
      (Amount of outs x 4) – (Amount of outs – 8) = Your Equity

      About Question #3:

      Board: J:spade: 9:club: 8:heart:
             Equity     Win     Tie
      UTG    41.41%  41.41%   0.00% { KsQd }
      UTG+1  58.59%  58.59%   0.00% { 7h7c }

      Hopefully this wasn't too easy homework for you.
    • faronel
      faronel
      Bronze
      Joined: 13.07.2011 Posts: 1,186
      Hm, I totally miscalculated the pot odds, lol. somehow didn't account hero's bet before raise, lol...


      About the formula. It seems nifty, I mean I can use it at tables. But that requires a lot of post flop skill - I mean I have to read opponent's hand to know what outs I truly have. Otherwise I can overplay my hand. =) )
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Originally posted by faronel
      Hm, I totally miscalculated the pot odds, lol. somehow didn't account hero's bet before raise, lol...


      About the formula. It seems nifty, I mean I can use it at tables. But that requires a lot of post flop skill - I mean I have to read opponent's hand to know what outs I truly have. Otherwise I can overplay my hand. =) )
      Not only draws are overplayed but as well just top pair type of hands as well and to get better you have to start from somewhere. :D That kind of formula is mainly for live play cause during online game most likely you wont be calculating.
    • faronel
      faronel
      Bronze
      Joined: 13.07.2011 Posts: 1,186
      Question 1: Question 1: Post a hand for evaluation where you have based your decisions on the stats of your opponents. (Post your hand in the Hand evaluation board, and provide a link to your hand in your private thread.)

      In the hand posted, the hand sample is quite small, but "the stats" used were the previously noted bet sizes for flop. And in our hand again, villain cbets half the pot which signals weakness.

      A hand to evaluate

      Question 2: Evaluate one of the hands submitted by other members. (Choose a hand from the Hand evaluation board and post your own evaluation in the thread. Post a link to the hand you have evaluated in your private thread. You can evaluate as many hands as you want, but try to choose hands not yet evaluated by other users first.)

      Me evaluating a random hand

      Question 3: Consider the following situation:

      $10 NL Hold'em (7-handed)

      Stacks & Stats:

      UTG ($10)
      MP ($8)
      MP2 ($9)
      CO ($10)
      Hero($10)
      SB ($10) (17/13/2.6/24/1212) [VPIP/PFR/AF/WTS/Hands]
      BB ($10) (27/9/2.0/29/333) [VPIP/PFR/AF/WTS/Hands]

      Preflop: Hero is BU with 6:diamond: , 7:diamond:
      4 folds, Hero raises to $0.40, SB calls $0.40, BB calls $0.40

      Flop: ($1.20) 3:diamond: , 3:heart: , T:diamond: (3 players)
      SB checks, BB checks, Hero checks

      Turn: ($1.20) J:diamond: d (3 players)
      SB bets $1.00, BB calls $1.00, Hero...

      What action would you take, and why?

      I like hero's checking behind, since the board is paired and it is a multiway pot. No point semi-bluffing here and easier to go for pot control.
      On turn, hero completes flush, but faces a bet from SB and a call from BB.
      Too bad there are no cold call stats, but based on the given stats, SB is somewhat solid that may be leading out with broadway type Tx, Jx. The BB, on the other hand, is more of a calling station (high VPIP, low PFR, higher WTS) and I wouldn't be surprised if he is still flush drawing here. For hero, there are just too many cards that can kill hero's completed flush (4th diamond on the river, another T, another 3, another J). So, hero has to decide wherether he will try to fight for the pot here or just give it up. The better option would try to get the pot here and raise for protection and gaining fold equity (since blinds' WTS stats are not that high and they can find the "fold" button).




      Question 4: Consider the following situation:

      $10 NL Hold'em (8-handed)

      Stacks & Stats:

      UTG ($8)
      MP ($10)
      MP2 ($9)
      MP3 ($6)
      Hero ($10)
      BU ($10) (25/21/3.8/26/1250) [VPIP/PFR/AF/WTS/Hands]
      SB ($10)
      BB ($10)

      Preflop: Hero is CO with J:heart: , J:spade:
      4 folds, Hero raises to $0.40, BU 3-bets to $1.30, 2 folds, Hero calls $1.30

      Flop: ($2.75) 6:heart: , 9:spade: , T:club: (2 players)
      Hero...

      What action would you take, and why?

      When BTN 3bets CO's raise preflop, I would put BTN on a range that he feels he is at least somewhat ahead against CO's raise range, so it wouldn't be only "bluff range". The proposed rationalization is based on BTN's aggressive stats (AF 3,8, PFR 21%, WTS 26%). The range:
      66+,A2s+,KQs,QJs,JTs,ATo+
      CO's equity is 63% versus given tightened range on a given flop.
      Also, button's range includes a lot of hands that missed the flop. I would expect BTN to cbet the flop, in which case the best option would be check/raise for a) fold equity (if BTN didn't hit) and b) value (since all cards but A preserve our 60% equity on turn).
    • faronel
      faronel
      Bronze
      Joined: 13.07.2011 Posts: 1,186
      Question 1: Post a hand for evaluation where you have either a) freeplay, b) slowplay, or c) multi-way pot situation. (Post your hand in the Hand evaluation board, and provide a link to your hand in your private thread.)

      A freeplay hand

      Question 2: Evaluate one of the hands submitted by other members. (Choose a hand from the Hand evaluation board and post your own evaluation in the thread. Post a link to the hand you have evaluated in your private thread. You can evaluate as many hands as you want, but try to choose hands not yet evaluated by other users first.)

      Me evaluating a random hand

      Question 3: Consider the following situation:

      $25 NL Hold'em (10 handed)

      Stacks & Stats

      UTG ($25)
      UTG+1 ($25) rock
      UTG+2 ($25)
      MP1 ($25)
      MP2 ($25) LAG
      MP3 ($25) maniac
      CO ($25)
      Hero BU ($25)
      SB ($25)
      BB ($25) calling station

      Preflop: Hero is BU with Q:heart: , J:heart:
      5 folds, MP3 raises $1.00, CO calls $1.00, Hero calls $1.00, 1 fold, BB calls $1.00

      Flop: ($4.10) 3:heart: , J:club: , A:diamond: (4 players)
      BB checks, MP3 checks, CO checks, Hero checks

      Turn: ($4.10) Q:club: (4 players)
      BB bets $2.05, 2 folds, Hero...?

      What action would you take, and why?

      If player profiles are close to reality (e.g. true rock, maniac, calling station), then I am rather surprised that the maniac didn't cbet on flop and just gave up on turn. Though, since he is out of the equation on turn, it doesn't really matter.
      On flop, I would have played the very same way: there is no reason to go crazy vs CS, maniac and a random CO with a relatively weak hand.
      On turn, CS decides to lead out... Usually, I have seen CSs bet in two scenarios: a) they have a hand that they think is really good for them, or b) they are trying to bluff their way out on the river.
      I wouldn't be surprised if CS had A3, AJ, AQ, KT in his range. On the other hand, our two pair can still be ahead of CS's range. Hero should call once for pot control and re-evaluate on river. Folding two pairs in position vs relatively small bet is quite a weak move.
    • faronel
      faronel
      Bronze
      Joined: 13.07.2011 Posts: 1,186
      Sometimes, poker is fun...

      PartyGaming - $0.10 NL - Holdem - 9 players
      Hand converted by PokerTracker 3

      UTG+1: $14.11
      MP: $11.10
      MP+1: $11.03
      Hero (LP): $11.54
      CO: $10.00
      BTN: $11.07
      SB: $9.45
      BB: $4.72
      UTG: $14.20

      SB posts SB $0.05, BB posts BB $0.10

      Pre Flop: ($0.15) Hero has T:heart: A:diamond:

      fold, fold, fold, fold, Hero raises to $0.40, fold, fold, fold, BB calls $0.30

      Flop: ($0.85, 2 players) T:spade: Q:club: 6:diamond:
      fold

      Hero wins $0.81
    • faronel
      faronel
      Bronze
      Joined: 13.07.2011 Posts: 1,186
      Question 1: Post a hand for evaluation where you have played on a 6-max table (short-handed). (Post your hand in the No Limit: Hand Evaluations forum, and provide a link to your hand in your private thread.)

      An interesting 6-max situation

      Question 2: Evaluate one of the hands submitted by other members. (Choose a hand from the No Limit: Hand Evaluations board and post your own evaluation in the thread. Post a link to the hand you have evaluated in your private thread. You can evaluate as many hands as you want, but try to choose hands not yet evaluated by other users first.)

      Me evaluating a random hand from 6-max

      Question 3: Consider the following situation:

      $10 NL Hold'em (6 handed)

      Stacks & Stats:

      UTG ($10)
      MP ($10)
      CO ($10)
      BU($10)
      SB ($10)
      BB (Hero) ($10)

      Preflop: Hero is BB with 5:heart: , 4:heart:
      2 folds, CO raises to $0.40, BU calls $0.40, SB calls $0.40, Hero calls $0.40

      Flop: ($1.60) 3:spade: , 2:heart: , Q:heart: (4 players)
      SB checks, Hero bets $1.20, CO Raises All-in, BU calls All-in, SB folds, Hero...

      What action would you take, and why?

      First, villain's ranges:
      Into CO's range I put: A:heart: 3:heart: , A:heart: K:heart: , KK-AA, Q3s. Overpockets and two pairs maybe overplayed here, but still included them.
      Button is who is calling down PFA's allin after BB's donk. I sense only sets here: 22, 33, QQ. QQ is strange here, but maybe some unorthodox slowplay vs CO (fish button :f_biggrin: ).
      All in all:
      For the given ranges equities are: CO - 7.85%, BU - 56.87% and hero - 35.28%.

      We need at least 38% equity (8.40/22) to make a profitable call. Hence, fold.


      Question 4: Consider the following situation:

      $10 NL Hold'em (6 handed)

      Stacks & Stats:

      UTG ($10)
      MP ($10)
      CO (Hero) ($10)
      BU($10)
      SB ($10)
      BB ($10)

      Preflop: Hero is CO with A:club: , K:spade:
      2 folds, Hero raises to $0.40, BU calls $0.40, SB calls $0.40, BB calls $0.40

      Flop: ($1.60) A:spade: , 4:club: , 4:diamond: (4 players)
      SB checks, BB bets $1.20, Hero...

      What action would you take, and why?

      Without any additional information on BB, this is far ahead/far behind situation where BB decides to donk on this very dry board OOP vs PFA and in a multiway pot. It's either we are against a weaker ace who just plays bad (to "protect his hand") or it's 4x that has us beat. So, raising for value makes no sense here (we can make weaker A fold and 4x has us beat). Besides, there are still two players to act after us and who will most likely continue only with a better hand, which, again, argues against a raise. Folding is too weak too, since we have completed a relatively strong hand. The optimal option would be a call and re-evaluate after the others made their move or on a turn.
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good Job! Homework #5 Done!

      About Task #3
      It's a very close decision: does protection or pot control weigh heavier here? Do you want to protect against hands like 3x or A:dx and K:dx? Or do you want to control the pot size and try to induce a bluff on the river in case there is no T, no J and no additional ?

      Raise/fold is out of question - with the given pot size and the good made hand you have, it can't even be considered.

      In case you decide to go broke, you can't really be blamed either. It's not a sign of weakness that the rather tight small blind decides to bet into two people here, though. I would say a call is to be slightly favored, while the many outs against you are annoying. The big blind who calls rather loosely speaks in favor of a raise/broke again. Both options are finally considered equal, which shows - all things considered - how close and full of variance these spots really are.

      About Task #4
      You've called pre-flop and then hit a good board. You basically have two choices now: either you assume that your opponent will go broke loosely or puts you on a bluff often and you thus check/raise - or you play check/call in the spirit of way ahead / way behind. The problem with the latter is that there are a lot of cards you don't want to see in the later course of the hand. All in all, it depends on your balancing as both lines make sense under certain circumstances.

      A check/fold would be really pointless, of course. It's hard to say whether you should donk-bet here; donk/fold can be discarded as that would turn your hand into a pure bluff and your opponent would interpret this as weakness and start raising you out of flops with hands like AK/AQ/air. So, if you want to donk-bet, it has to be a donk/3-bet.

      Good luck on tables and with the Course.
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good Job! Homework #6 Done!

      About Question #3:
      Two lines can quickly be discarded here: fold and raise/fold; your hand is simply too strong for those alternatives.

      It's hard to assess whether you should put in a raise here. When a rather passive player decides to bet into three players while being out of position, it does look strong. It's more likely an indication of a made hand than that of a draw.

      A raise naturally protects, but you run the risk of isolating yourself against very strong range. Which weaker hands could your opponent possibly continue playing here?

      The deciding factor finally comes in the size of the pot. This tiny pot simply isn't worth putting yourself into a tough spot where you could potentially end up risking your entire stack. A raise would be overplayed here and pot control takes the precedent over protection.

      Best of Luck on the tables and with the Course.
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