Meet the Gambling Professor (12 sept new article posted)

  • 22 replies
    • MarcPS
      MarcPS
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      excellent. well worth watching!

      what a lovely surprise from our colleagues in the Italian Community!

      tyty
    • cagnoozo
      cagnoozo
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      Joined: 12.12.2008 Posts: 870
      Originally posted by MarcPS
      excellent. well worth watching!

      what a lovely surprise from our colleagues in the Italian Community!

      tyty
      Thanks a lot, we'll be back then!
    • EmilDahlman
      EmilDahlman
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      Joined: 21.05.2011 Posts: 446
      A very smart man! :) Hope to hear more from him.
    • cagnoozo
      cagnoozo
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      Originally posted by EmilDahlman
      A very smart man! :) Hope to hear more from him.
      I am very interested in seeing what will come out, in the next few years, from the encounter between empirical poker gurus and academic researchers and I hope PS and Mark can one day cooperate to create something really new and innovative in terms of research, psychology and strategy... who knows...
    • roopopper
      roopopper
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      Joined: 31.12.2010 Posts: 4,289
      great stuff !!! :)
    • DrDunne
      DrDunne
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      Joined: 29.12.2010 Posts: 3,345
      awesome
    • cagnoozo
      cagnoozo
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      Originally posted by roopopper
      great stuff !!! :)
      What I liked most is the clear feeling of a broad, brand new field of studies coming to life: theory of games, psychology, mathematics and debated neuropsychology are somehow learning to mingle on the unexpected background of poker rooms.

      Poker is growing into a formalized mental discipline of its own and its requirements in terms of discipline, cold-blood and reasoning fit the fashion, the taste and the needs of our age. It is just going to be natural that academics take interest in a grinders' mind, or in a high-stake income management and so on.

      It's all new fields and with interest and partaking, we and this unique school of ours are already effortless actors in the first steps of academic research in the world of poker.

      Let me know your say,

      Cagnoozo
    • jbpatzer
      jbpatzer
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      Joined: 22.11.2009 Posts: 6,944
      You mean there are two of us??? I will watch this later. :D

      EDIT: Interesting. I wonder whether he'd be interested in talking to a poker-obsessed maths professor.......
    • BOBOsvk
      BOBOsvk
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      Originally posted by jbpatzer
      You mean there are two of us??? I will watch this later. :D
      no, u are unique
    • cagnoozo
      cagnoozo
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      Joined: 12.12.2008 Posts: 870
      Originally posted by jbpatzer
      You mean there are two of us??? I will watch this later. :D

      EDIT: Interesting. I wonder whether he'd be interested in talking to a poker-obsessed maths professor.......
      you have a point there =)
    • dogma18
      dogma18
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      Joined: 08.12.2009 Posts: 340
      really interesting, thanks
    • cagnoozo
      cagnoozo
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      Originally posted by jbpatzer
      You mean there are two of us??? I will watch this later. :D

      EDIT: Interesting. I wonder whether he'd be interested in talking to a poker-obsessed maths professor.......
      I look forward to the day my son will get a PhD in Philology of Poker with a dissertation on River Ethics.
    • datsmahname
      datsmahname
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      Joined: 23.11.2009 Posts: 1,366
      very interesting. Thanks for doing this. Hopefully PS will continue to develop a kind of collaboration here. I expect he may be interested in our community since it gives him access to many players who represent a certain part of the population of gamblers. We may end up learning quite a lot from one another.
    • Danhel
      Danhel
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      well done :)
    • cagnoozo
      cagnoozo
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      Originally posted by datsmahname
      very interesting. Thanks for doing this. Hopefully PS will continue to develop a kind of collaboration here. I expect he may be interested in our community since it gives him access to many players who represent a certain part of the population of gamblers. We may end up learning quite a lot from one another.
      Thanks to you and all taking interest in this.
      I have your very same idea and will try.
    • cagnoozo
      cagnoozo
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      Hi everyone,

      Here's a pleasant read for a monday morning: an article about poker player types by professor Griffiths. As he promised to our community in the interview, Mark has shared some of his previously published work. Thanks to him and to Nottingham Trent University.

      As we are all players, some of this or of further work I'm going to post might sound a little basic to us - in fact we are a specialized and very demanding audience.

      Nevertheless, here we get the chance of looking at academics while they begin to look at us as a subject of research: we'll be reading the groundwork, the beginnings of poker research, the early evidence of formalized studies about poker players and as such this and future papers bear a unique value.

      I hope that with your feedback and Mark's help, we will be producing growingly more insightful contents, capable of merging players' empirical knowledge with researchers' expertise.

      Conforming to type: What type of poker player are you?

      Professor Mark Griffiths
      International Gaming Research Unit, Nottingham Trent University


      A few years ago I helped a leading Internet poker company do some research on different types of poker player. With the help of US poker tournament director Jack McClelland, the typology was based on a survey of 2000 poker players and produced seven different types of player including ‘The General’, ‘The Joker’, ‘The Wallflower’, ‘The Calculator’, ‘The Hunter’, ‘The Artisan’, and ‘The Politician’.

      The study found that 39% of players were Wallflowers or Calculators (40% male and 38% female), 17% were Jokers (16% male and 17% female), 15% were Generals (17% male and 13% female) and 4% were Hunters (5% male and 3% female). The ‘Politician’ and ‘Artisan’ sub-types constituted only a very small minority of players. So which type of player are you? Here is a quick psycho-portrait of each type.

      The General: Instantly recognisable for their guts, Generals won’t shirk in the face of risk and are comfortable in their ability to fight back from a short stack. In everyday life, The General’s supreme self-belief can be overbearing, but Generals tend to reap the rewards and are often very successful in their careers. At the green baize, the high risk-high gain strategy employed tends to see them bust out first or win the lot.

      The Joker: A natural born entertainer, a jester at the table who ensures everyone will have fun. Well liked, Jokers command other’s allegiances and will use this to their advantage. But beware, they are more than happy to talk you off a pot should they choose to. Unfortunately, Jokers are as easily distracted, and can be distracting at the poker table. This can be dangerous. A lack of discipline and patience can make you question whether the Jokers are equipped with the will to win. What’s more, their need to be liked can often stand in their way of closing in on the kill.

      The Wallflower: The Wallflower is happy to sit on the sidelines and wait for others to fight it out before they get involved. In everyday life the Wallflower will rarely throw in their lot with anyone and will take their time to make allegiances.

      Wallflowers are equipped with the most important of all poker virtues – patience. Their tendency to avoid the quagmire of the group dynamic gives them an extra edge – their relationships come with no baggage. While the others fight it out the Wallflower will sit back, observe and learn. According to journalist and female poker player Victoria Coren, while Wallflowers can survive quite a while in a game, they can’t necessarily change gear later and nail money finishes.

      The Calculator: Cool, composed and naturally conservative, Calculators will only go into a hand with the best of it. In everyday life, Calculators were often the cleverest kids in their class – if not the ones with the biggest circle of friends. Instinctively risk-averse, their strengths as a poker player include a methodical approach and the ability to separate emotion from decisions. Skilful as they may be, there is no easier player to read than a Calculator. What’s more, Calculators can be quite passive and are unwilling to chase the action if it doesn’t come their way.

      The Hunter: At first glance, the Hunter can easily be mistaken for a General. Both exude the same forcefulness and strength of character, but where The General is all about thought through risks, The Hunter is all about naked aggression. Off the poker table, Hunters aren’t always the best communicators, but are hugely loyal and very determined. On the poker table, a Hunter is a formidable opponent and loves the thrill of trying to beat the odds. A loose player, they’ll play a lot of hands and will feed off the weaker players by bullying them off pots.

      The Politician: An arch manipulator, you can spot Politicians because they’re your best friends. Trouble is, they’re also your next-door neighbour’s best friend and even your enemy’s best friend. Their good qualities are highly tuned instincts and a whole deck of charisma. Both will serve them well at the poker table, but both can also lead to trouble. A tendency to play the people rather than the cards can spell disaster, and the Politician is one of the most likely players to bluff.

      The Artisan: At first glance, the Artisan may not appear to be a natural born poker player. Led by the creative left side of their brain rather than the more mathematical right hand side, Artisans are more usually found engaged in less competitive activities. However, Artisans have very finely honed intuitive skills and always love to rise to a challenge. An Artisan will take a very lateral approach to the game and won’t be scared to make a move if their instincts tell them to.

      (Please note, material contained in this article originally appeared in one of Professor Griffiths’ regular columns for the magazine ‘Inside Edge’, all rights Mark Griffiths 2011)
    • DtotheC
      DtotheC
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      Joined: 23.11.2010 Posts: 259
      Very interesting stuff! As this area of study grows and develops further, I think we will see a lot more revelations about the inner workings of the mind of a poker player.

      A couple of interesting thoughts to share;

      - Where do you think the likes of Doyle Brunson or Phil Ivey would sit in the psychological profiling outlined above? Different play styles, different eras, but both hugely successful. I think the the big differences and the similarities make them an interesting test case.

      - Game Theory is a fast developing topic in many universities around the world. Not just for poker, but for all types of gaming. Studies so far have shown that people who play games regularly learn new things faster. The studies have been conclusive enough that a number of computer games are being developed for use in schools to teach children. For me the relevance here is the use of poker in teaching a number of really important lessons; things such as situational awareness, mathematics, even empathy.

      So I think this is a hugely exciting topic, in which interest is going to grow at a meteoric speed over the next 5-10 years.

      I will look forward to seeing more about this on our forums! If this is something you are interested in or have some experience/knowledge to share - get posting! :)
    • cagnoozo
      cagnoozo
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      Here's one more published article. This time the focus is much on actual gambling games. Mindset and practical tips to keep people head bouncing off the wall when they are down on those slotmachines.

      Regardless sheer gambling and its issues being something a little alien to most of the chess-minded online playerz, the PStrategist or the mere thinking player, you do still get some insight and good advice for your BM, as most of these ten golden rules match with the poker fundamentals of mindset control and cashgame mental coaching.

      Please note: the material contained in this article originally appeared in one of Professor Griffiths’ regular columns for the magazine ‘Inside Edge’. As this and future articles were designed for the broad audience of a magazine, they might be as in-depth and technically juicy as us poker readers would like, but this is just the beginning...

      The psychology of winning ways

      Professor Mark Griffiths
      International Gaming Research Unit, Nottingham Trent University


      Given my academic background it may come as little surprise that when I gamble, I expect to lose in the long run. However, that is not to say that I don’t have my ‘Top 10 Golden Rules’ that I apply in gambling situations. Some might say my rules are about the psychology of winning but I would prefer to describe them as the psychology of minimizing losses! In some situations, there is a very fine line between psychology and common sense and this is one of those occasions. So here goes.

      (1) Never gamble without some kind of pre-set plan. Winning gamblers set themselves win/loss goals before they enter a betting shop or casino. Only foolish gamblers play hand after hand or bet upon bet without direction. Planning and goals are the catalyst to life success and gambling is no different.

      (2) Don’t let the excitement of a gambling environment detract from the pre-set plan you entered with. For instance, when you are in a casino, remember that the alcohol, the music, the attractive women are there for a reason. They are there to make you spend more money. If you are in there to win, only do what you planned to do and don’t get side tracked.

      (3) Remember that the excitement of gambling itself can lead to irrational thought processes. Psychological research has consistently shown that when gamblers are in the thick of their gambling ‘action’, they tend to be more irrational in how they think. Irrationality leads to poor decision-making and pre-set plans often go out of the window. Just like alcohol, gambling can make the player do things that they would never have done in the cold light of day.

      (4) Don’t be tempted to use in-house cash machines and ATMs. Although they provide an ultra-convenient way to get more cash, they are there – in general – for one purpose. To entice those who are gambling not to stop or go home when they have run out of money that they walked in with. By walking out of the casino to get more money, there is more of a chance that you will have time to reflect during this “cooling off” period and not return. The psychology of casino management is to keep punters in there as long as possible. When it comes to in-house cash machines, you’re invariably paying over the odds to get the money out in the first place. I always find it sad to see the desperation on some gambler’s faces as they are waiting in line to get some money out. Make sure you’re not one of them.

      (5) Make sure you have the proper bankroll for the strategy and denominations that you intend to gamble with. The general rule that seems to do the rounds on most reputable websites and advice books is to take at least three times 400 credits of the highest denomination you are going to gamble with. There are obviously variations to this rule depending on the strategy you employ, but by and large this is the rule.

      (6) Only stay at the same betting shop, gaming table or slot machine for a pre-set amount of time. Always move onto another area or establishment if you feel physically or psychologically uncomfortable. This gives most gamblers a much needed “cooling off” period. If possible (and I am the first to admit it’s not always), spread your gambling around. In most big towns and cities there are numerous gambling establishments. In my research experience, those gamblers who sit at the same tables or machines for hours and hours are often miserable and unsatisfied gamblers. They are playing with money rather than for it.

      (7) Where possible, ignore promotions. As a general rule, gambling promotions are the highest money earners for the gambling establishment’s marketing department. They are designed to get you in the place or to get you gambling on something new. Avoid gambling with offers that seem too good to be true. They usually are! Stick with your pre-set plan and you’ll be fine.

      (8) Gamble at the establishment of your choice and not where someone else advises you gamble. This is all part of sticking to your pre-set plan and not letting others influence your gambling behaviour.

      (9) Learn to think for yourself. General advice (like this column) is one thing. Winners learn to sort things out for themselves and not rely on others. They are comfortable with how they approach their gambling. You should also disregard rumours. Gambling can often invoke certain urban myths, such as “your first bet after opening an Internet gambling account is always a winning one'.” Banking on such speculation while gambling is a recipe for disaster. Only factual information should inform your decision-making.

      (10) Finally, do your own “research”. As with any other product that involves the exchange of money, a gambler needs to do research to establish the best deals around. This is especially useful on Internet gambling sites but can be applied to offline gambling too.
    • roopopper
      roopopper
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      enjoying this thread , more of the this type of article would be great!! please :)

      Roo
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