How to master the push or fold phase using SNG Wiz

    • Avatars91
      Avatars91
      Bronze
      Joined: 18.12.2009 Posts: 2,689
      How does one improve his play regarding the push or fold phase?

      I am currently trying out SNG Wizard and I understand how great the software is and that it is a necessity, but I also don't believe that just blindly reviewing and analyzing my hand histories influences my play and decisions at the tables that greatly. Right now SNG Wiz is an excellent tool for checking my game on how many mistakes I am making and how serious these mistakes are, but really, I doubt that I posses the knowledge to understand the reasons why certain plays are mistakes, which is the key to recognizing similar situations in future.

      What do you suggest to focus on when reviewing one's sessions and how to make sure mistakes don't appear in future?
  • 6 replies
    • pzhon
      pzhon
      Bronze
      Joined: 17.06.2010 Posts: 1,151
      SNG Wizard is only a good tool for reviewing your play if you are constantly adjusting the default ranges. Suppose there is a reg in the small blind who pushes for 8 bb onto your big blind. How widely do you think he is pushing? 50%? 80%? ATC? Ok, now set up the situation in SNG Wizard: 100/200 with stacks of 2400, 4000, 2500, 1600 (villain), 3000 (hero). Give yourself A5o, and make the SB push. Do you call the push or not?

      According to SNG Wizard, it's a correct call as long as the SB is pushing more than about a 40% range. The default range of 26% for a SB push is way too tight. If you only call with the hands which are correct against a 26% range, 44+ A8s+ A9o then you are missing many valuable calls. If the SB is pushing with the default range then calling with A5o would be a big mistake, costing 1.24% of the prize pool or about 10% of a buy-in. Against a more realistic 80% push range, calling with A5o gains 1.27% of the prize pool. Missing this call would be a huge mistake which would cost 10% of a buy-in.

      If you don't constantly correct the default ranges, you will get bad feedback, and you might change from a winning player to a losing one. Adjusting the ranges all of the time does take a lot more effort, but then SNG Wizard will be a great tool. Unfortunately, there is no way to review all of your hands automatically using adjusted ranges, so the automatic analysis is close to useless. The automatic analysis quickly shows you your hands and some parts of the tournament which were push/fold, but it even skips some parts where it is normal to play push/fold. SNG Wizard will not complain if you fold AA with 11 big blinds because it assumes you don't want to play push/fold for more than 10 big blinds, which is often wrong from the small blind.

      Learn your opponents' ranges. Use SNG Wizard or other tools to learn how to go from your opponents' ranges to your exploitative responses.
    • Avatars91
      Avatars91
      Bronze
      Joined: 18.12.2009 Posts: 2,689
      Yes, I adjust the ranges as realistically as possible! And it is a tool of the utmost necessity. I just fail to see how to categorize all the mistakes and use the analyses in order not to make these bad plays next time when I sit at the tables i.e. how to reach a level where I don't make these mistakes anymore as simply adjusting the ranges and reviewing the game alone doesn't seem to have too great of an impact on my real time play at the moment: using the software just helps keep track of my mistakes (after analyzing my sessions, of course, with the help of range adjusting)

      I guess that in general what I am asking about could be called "an effective method of improving"
    • matel17
      matel17
      Bronze
      Joined: 11.07.2010 Posts: 1,278
      pzhon how do you estimate an opponent's pushing/calling range?
    • pzhon
      pzhon
      Bronze
      Joined: 17.06.2010 Posts: 1,151
      I try to stereotype players by their stats, and note deviations from the stereotype. For example, I have a rough idea of what a tight-early reg pushes in some situation. It's easy to see if a player has tight-early stats, and it is easy to see if the player turns up with a hand that surprises me. I take notes on these. It's harder to notice if a player is pushing tighter than I expect for that player type.

      I also perform more careful studies of particular players when I have a lot of data.
    • pzhon
      pzhon
      Bronze
      Joined: 17.06.2010 Posts: 1,151
      Originally posted by Avatars91
      I guess that in general what I am asking about could be called "an effective method of improving"
      Try to break the push-fold situations into smaller categories. Say, study blind-versus blind pushes, or situations where you had the chip lead on the bubble.
    • Avatars91
      Avatars91
      Bronze
      Joined: 18.12.2009 Posts: 2,689
      Try to break the push-fold situations into smaller categories. Say, study blind-versus blind pushes, or situations where you had the chip lead on the bubble.


      This is exactly what I wanted to hear! The problem is though that apart of these 2 situations you mentioned I have a difficulty categorizing the rest of them as there are, in my opinion, so many others. Such as situations with a different number of players still in the game, different blind levels, different positioning of stacks (say hero is in CO while the bigstack is either on the BU or in the BB) aso. Because there are so many of them, I don't understand how the human brain can remember it all. Or at least how to start trying.