Meras18

    • Meras18
      Meras18
      Bronze
      Joined: 28.09.2008 Posts: 114
      Introduction:

      Hi, I'm Meras from Germany and 21 years old. At the moment I'm studying, but got semester break, so I've quite a lot of time to improve my poker skills. I'm already playing poker for about three years, but not constant but rather with big breaks. I've started playing poker, because a friend of mine plays it too and he told me about Pokerstrategy.de. Then I passed the test and the first 50 euros were there. By now PS.de has given me two more donations and I'm playing at PokerStars and William Hill. Because of the small S&G-table structure there, I-ve started playing NL 2 two months ago.

      Homework #1

      Question 1: What is your motivation for playing poker?

      First it was my friend. After I've seen him playing, I thougt "This, you could do too and maybe you will get some money". Unfortunately I had to learn that +EV needs theory ;) But long time I hadn't the motivation for learning and so I often stopped playing because of losses.
      For the last 2 months I’m playing NL 2 and I'm really enjoying it, especially Shorthanded, because it offers so much action and different situations. And of course I like to beat other players and take their money.


      Question 2: What are your weaknesses when playing poker?

      My biggest weaknes was/is that I've seen poker only as a little freetime activity and I didn't really concentrate on the game. So I did many mistakes that could be easily avoided if I had thought about the hand/situation/villain etc. I'm working at it and it begins to work.
      The second biggest problem is my mood changes. At the meanwhile I can handle the first badbeats quite good, but after a while down swinging, I tilt almost every time and it gets worse. So this is also the reason why I’ve often broke up with poker for many months.
      In addition I do the same mistakes as every beginner does, I guess. Especially at the post flop game. So often I’m not sure what to do. Espacially if villain does some minraising or something that’s not managed in the SHC.


      Question 3: What does it mean to play tight-aggressive?

      In my opinion it means to play in the right situation. The hand does not always matter. You can steal with 72o in SB, if the BB folds enough. I think tight-aggressive means to choose your hands by looking at them, your position and villain. And if you decide to play your hand you do it aggressively by betting and raising, because you want to extract value and sometimes foldequity. So in the end you are only playing about 20% of your hands, but if you think you have the best hand, you easily go broke.

      Now I'm looking forward to hearing the first suggestions :)
  • 13 replies
    • UPAY4DINNER
      UPAY4DINNER
      Silver
      Joined: 27.09.2009 Posts: 21,978
      Hello Meras,

      Welcome to the NL Beginners Course :)

      I too have been playing poker for a similar time and also have had some long breaks in between. It's hard to forget about poker though in my opinion and I always ended getting sucked back in somehow :)

      I wish you every success in this course and I'm sure you will be printing the $$$ and moving up the limits in no time :)

      Kind regards,
      Gary
    • Meras18
      Meras18
      Bronze
      Joined: 28.09.2008 Posts: 114
      Homework #2

      Question 1: What do you think you could play differently than how it is in the BSS Starting Hands Chart, and why?

      Because I'm playing SH and not FR, I play looser than in the SHC. And I raise every playable hand first in (e.g. 22+, KTs+, QTs+ suited connectors, A8s+) instead of limping.
      In addition I'm looking at the position of my villain. E.g.: If he raises from UTG+1, I'll fold ATs in SB, but if he raises from BU, I'll 3bet.

      Question 2: Post a hand for evaluation where you have a question regarding your pre-flop play.

      NL4 SH: PF: AKo vs. 3bet

      Question 3: What is the equity of AKo against the top 5% range?

      de.pokerstrategy.com
      Equity Win Tie
      46.32% 37.92% 8.41% { AKo }
      53.68% 45.27% 8.41% { 88+, AJs+, KQs, AKo }
    • Meras18
      Meras18
      Bronze
      Joined: 28.09.2008 Posts: 114
      I hope it’s ok and welcomed to post questions here:

      Yesterday I have played against a maniac. He limped almost every hand or calls every raise and postflop he played very aggressive. At the beginning I lost some semibluff c-bets against him and as I realized his kind of play I slowed down and waited for a good hand, because I thought he would pay me off if I had hit a made hand. Unfortunately I didn't hit the flop even once against him and so I lost some more money and the worst part was that he made me tilt a bit.

      So I'm wondering when I should left the table. Of course when I realized that I tilted I left the table, but should I leave earlier or wait for a good situation stubbornly?
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good job! Homework #1 Done!

      Well, the success in poker comes from the investment you put into it. The more you concentrate the more you learn and the better you get. 1st step was for you joining with the course which will very likely help you come along with basics. :)

      Easiest wait to fight against tilt is to set up stop-loss technique. Which means if you for example have lost more than 3BIs for a session then you just stop the session for some time. The BI amount is set up from your own wanting. Some may put it higher, some lower. And after the stop you can easily just spend some time with evaluating your play.

      Most of the other weakness you wrote can easily be fixed with you posting hands (analyzing your session). We will start writing feedback to your play. Usually negative feedback will put you into thinking phase and trying to fix all those leaks. It's almost the same as you loose money, you will remember it more than winning part. By this situation it's gonna be that negative feedback you gonna remember and try to avoid them next time.

      Welcome to the Course and Best of Luck. Some more points earned.
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good job! Homework #2 Done!

      SH ranges are whole different thing. For example you can steal there with a lot wider range. You can 3bet with wider range.

      About 3betting is the case that you don't always have to 3bet for value. If we know that the opponent is easily capable of folding to 3bets a lot or just plays fit fold postflop then our 3bet as bluff can work also. All those kind of broadways type of hands are actually very good for that. They also have usually a blocker in them.

      Also I do agree with your thoughts about not limping hands but rather raising. :) Totally fine and I am doing with all my hands like that. SHC just says the basic steps for FR to limp PPs but on higher limits you will never play them profitable. While the opponents will just adjust to your limping range and will know with what you limp.

      Hopefully you enjoy the School so far. Some more points earned.
    • Meras18
      Meras18
      Bronze
      Joined: 28.09.2008 Posts: 114
      Homework #3

      Question 1: You are holding KQ. What is your preflop equity against an opponent who has 33? How does the equity change on the following flop: J53?

      Preflop:

             Equity     Win     Tie
      MP2    48.14%  47.75%   0.39% { KQo }
      MP3    51.86%  51.47%   0.39% { 33 }

      Flop:

      Board: J:heart: 3:heart: 6:spade:
             Equity     Win     Tie
      MP2     4.95%   4.95%   0.00% { KQo }
      MP3    95.05%  95.05%   0.00% { 33 }

      Question 2: What would you do in the following hand?

      I would play the same way till the Turn. The turn I would play check/fold or call if the odds are ok. I think this would be the easiest way.
      Maybe you could think about a small block-bet, but I would prefer one opponent for this move. And Hero has bet almost a potsize-bet and I don't see the reason in this.

      Question 3: Post a hand for evaluation where you have a question regarding your post-flop play.

      NL 4 SH: Set vs. Flush(draw)
    • Meras18
      Meras18
      Bronze
      Joined: 28.09.2008 Posts: 114
      Homework #4

      Question 1: Post a hand for evaluation where you have the initiative post-flop.

      NL 4 SH: KK vs. A-high board

      Question 2: Evaluate one of the hands submitted by other members.

      [NL2 FR BSS] Top pair vs donk flop

      Unfortunately there was one person a bit quicker than me, but as I wrote my suggestion I didn't know his one.

      Question 3: You are on the flop with K :spade: Q :diamond: . The board cards are J :spade: , 9 :club: , 8 :heart: , and your opponent holds 77. What is your equity in this spot?

      Board: 8:heart: J:spade: 9:club:
             Equity     Win     Tie
      MP2    41.41%  41.41%   0.00% { KsQd }
      MP3    58.59%  58.59%   0.00% { 7h7c }
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good job! Homework #3 Done!

      About Question #3:
      There are few situations on turn:
      a) If we take just odds for the FD and we take into account that all our odds are clean. There which means:
      Total Pot = $0,91 ; We have to Call = $0,22 -> According to that it means we are getting ~4,16:1 odds. For flushdraw we would need 4:1. Which tells us that we are getting perfect odds.
      b) If we consider the opponent having sets here:
      Which means we have to discount outs, for example 6 and also 3. Which means we have 7 clean outs. Which means that we need 6:1 odds. That tells us that we need ~$0,41 on river to make it profitable. If we expect the opponent being loose enough and being able to pay us no-matter what then we can do the Call here properly.
      c) We might even have overcards as outs or even 4 as a out:
      Although this kind of situation ain't that likely. I'd rather discount that one and either pick a) or b). Most likely towards Call.

      You are doing great progress! Some more points earned.
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good job! Homework #4 Done!

      This weeks homework was a bit easier. But the idea of that is to help you go through last weeks stuff if you didn't go through everything. Or either way maybe even read some more articles, watch some videos and of course attend in the coaching. What will also help for your game is the evaluation part of other members hands and of course posting your own hands.

      Hopefully this wasn't too easy homework for you. Some more points earned.
    • Meras18
      Meras18
      Bronze
      Joined: 28.09.2008 Posts: 114
      Homework #5

      Question 1: Post a hand for evaluation where you have based your decisions on the stats of your opponents.

      NL 2 FR: AJo vs. raise ahead & maniac after
      NL 2 FR: AJs vs. NIT

      Question 2: Evaluate one of the hands submitted by other members.

      NL2 KK vs possible straight, set

      Question 3: Consider the following situation:

      I would raise here and try to get it right in on the Turn. First for max value and protection against FD.

      Question 4: Consider the following situation:

      I think I would c/c here, because villain is very aggressive and would raise almost every time my donkbet and I couldn't consider where I stand then. So I would try to see the SD as cheap as possible. If an overcard showed up on the Turn or River I would consider folding or if his bets were too large.
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good Job! Homework #5 Done!

      About Task #3
      It's a very close decision: does protection or pot control weigh heavier here? Do you want to protect against hands like 3x or A:dx and K:dx? Or do you want to control the pot size and try to induce a bluff on the river in case there is no T, no J and no additional ?

      Raise/fold is out of question - with the given pot size and the good made hand you have, it can't even be considered.

      In case you decide to go broke, you can't really be blamed either. It's not a sign of weakness that the rather tight small blind decides to bet into two people here, though. I would say a call is to be slightly favored, while the many outs against you are annoying. The big blind who calls rather loosely speaks in favor of a raise/broke again. Both options are finally considered equal, which shows - all things considered - how close and full of variance these spots really are.

      About Task #4
      You've called pre-flop and then hit a good board. You basically have two choices now: either you assume that your opponent will go broke loosely or puts you on a bluff often and you thus check/raise - or you play check/call in the spirit of way ahead / way behind. The problem with the latter is that there are a lot of cards you don't want to see in the later course of the hand. All in all, it depends on your balancing as both lines make sense under certain circumstances.

      A check/fold would be really pointless, of course. It's hard to say whether you should donk-bet here; donk/fold can be discarded as that would turn your hand into a pure bluff and your opponent would interpret this as weakness and start raising you out of flops with hands like AK/AQ/air. So, if you want to donk-bet, it has to be a donk/3-bet.

      Good luck on tables and with the School. Some more points earned.
    • Meras18
      Meras18
      Bronze
      Joined: 28.09.2008 Posts: 114
      Homework #6

      Question 1: Post a hand for evaluation where you have either a) freeplay, b) slowplay, or c) multi-way pot situation.

      Nl 2 FR: Slowplay Quads

      Question 2: Evaluate one of the hands submitted by other members.

      how evaluate this hand AA?

      Question 3: Consider the following situation:

      The Q looks nice, because we get 2pair, but I think you have to be careful here because of villains bet. You definite him as a “callingstation”, so I would not suspect him to bet any draws into 3 opponents, more likely he bets a set, 2pair or maybe AK .
      So I think we are in way ahead/way behind situation, but there aren’t many hands we have beat. So I would decide to call the turn and will fold the river on another bet, if our hand doesn't improve.
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good Job! Homework #6 Done!

      About Question #3:
      Two lines can quickly be discarded here: fold and raise/fold; your hand is simply too strong for those alternatives.

      It's hard to assess whether you should put in a raise here. When a rather passive player decides to bet into three players while being out of position, it does look strong. It's more likely an indication of a made hand than that of a draw.

      A raise naturally protects, but you run the risk of isolating yourself against very strong range. Which weaker hands could your opponent possibly continue playing here?

      The deciding factor finally comes in the size of the pot. This tiny pot simply isn't worth putting yourself into a tough spot where you could potentially end up risking your entire stack. A raise would be overplayed here and pot control takes the precedent over protection.

      Best of Luck on tables and with the Course. Some more points earned.