spid3rix

    • spid3rix
      spid3rix
      Bronze
      Joined: 24.01.2011 Posts: 236
      Hello! My name is Marian and I am 30 years old, I live in Romania. I got into NL Holdem like a year ago and I played MSS at NL5 until recently and now I play BSS at NL05. I joined this project to learn new things about the game :)
  • 16 replies
    • purplefizz
      purplefizz
      Bronze
      Joined: 12.03.2008 Posts: 4,508
      hi Marian,

      Welcome to the Beginner's Course!
      We hope you will have fun and learn plenty of new things about poker.
      Show the boys how it's done ;)


      smiles,
      wendy
    • spid3rix
      spid3rix
      Bronze
      Joined: 24.01.2011 Posts: 236
      Ahm, I think there is a bit of misunderstanding since I am a boy too :D Anyway thanks for the support :s_cool:
    • spid3rix
      spid3rix
      Bronze
      Joined: 24.01.2011 Posts: 236
      Homework 1

      Question 1 - What is your motivation for playing poker?

      At the beginning, it was just curiosity. Afterwards, it become a hobby. In life, I usually do only the things I like and I put a lot of heart into it. It's same with playing poker. Now I play it with the goal of beating every limit. I am a very competitive person and I set myself goals. Poker gives me this competition.

      Question 2 - What are your weaknesses when playing poker?

      My biggest weakness in poker is that I don't make a 3 street plan. That sometimes leads me to bad decisions.
      Another weakness is sizing 3bets/4bets preflop to give me the right bet sizing on flop and the other streets. I know what standard 3bet/4 bet sizing, but i don't know how to adapt it to each situation and it leads me to situations where I can't fold a bad hand because of the pot odds.

      Question 3 - What does it mean to play tight aggressive?

      TAG means for me that you have to play only some good hands and you have to play them aggressively to put pressure on the opponents. And when villain is under pressure he will do a lot of mistakes. Taking advantage of those mistakes makes TAG players profitable. Also, TAG gives you a very good image at the table and people will respect your actions more when you establish that image.
    • purplefizz
      purplefizz
      Bronze
      Joined: 12.03.2008 Posts: 4,508
      Originally posted by spid3rix
      Ahm, I think there is a bit of misunderstanding since I am a boy too :D Anyway thanks for the support :s_cool:
      oops sorry :s_evil: now i feel a bit embarassed. its just that i have a friend with the same name (and she is a girl). and there are so few girls around here, siiigh, that i start to imagine things.

      then, show the other boys how it's done! :D
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good job! Homework #1 Done!

      Most of the weakness you wrote can easily be fixed with you posting hands (analyzing your session). We will start writing feedback to your play. Usually negative feedback will put you into thinking phase and trying to fix all those leaks. It's almost the same as you loose money, you will remember it more than winning part. By this situation it's gonna be that negative feedback you gonna remember and try to avoid them next time.

      Also about having the plan is the main problem that you just haven't had enough of situation that you even should know how you should plan the hand or how you should play. That's also why analyzing hands is very important.

      Welcome to the Course and Best of Luck. Some more points earned.
    • spid3rix
      spid3rix
      Bronze
      Joined: 24.01.2011 Posts: 236
      Homework 2

      Question 1 - What do you think you could play differently than suggested in the BSS Starting Hands Chart and why?

      I think i can play differently pocket pairs. In SHC, pocket pairs should be played by open limp, over limp or calling a raise no more then 20x the size of each stack involved. I would rather open raise pocket pairs because this way my hand would be less predictable.

      Question 2 - Do you have questions about your preflop play?

      AKo SB NL2

      Question 3 - What is the equity of AKo against the top 5% range? 5% means 88+, AJs+, KQs, AKo.

      Equity Win Tie
      MP2 53.68% 45.27% 8.41% 88+, AJs+, KQs, AKo
      MP3 46.32% 37.91% 8.41% AKo
    • spid3rix
      spid3rix
      Bronze
      Joined: 24.01.2011 Posts: 236
      Homework 3

      Question 0: Download and install the Equilab.
      Done :)

      Question 1: You are holding K :spade: Q :spade: . What is your preflop equity against an opponent who has 3 :diamond: 3 :club: ? How does the equity change on this flop: J :spade: 5 :diamond: 3 :spade: ?

      Preflop:

      Equity Win Tie
      CO 50.78% 50.40% 0.38% KsQs
      BU 49.22% 48.84% 0.38% 3d3c

      Postflop:

      Equity Win Tie
      CO 26.46% 26.46% 0.00% KsQs
      BU 73.54% 73.54% 0.00% 3d3c

      Question 2: What would you do in the following hand?

      I would call. We need to put 22 cents in a 91 cents pot. Against the villain range (44, 55, 34, A5, A4, last 3 depend on the player), we are behind and we will hit the nut flush in 1 from 5 cases and for the call we need to study our implied odds. For the call to be profitable we need to obtain 10 cents more from the villain if we hit on the river and since he showed strength on the turn, it is very likely that we will be paid.

      Question 3: Do you have questions about your postflop play? Post your hand for evaluation.

      AJo MP1 NL2
    • w34z3l
      w34z3l
      Coach
      Coach
      Joined: 03.08.2009 Posts: 13,297
      Isn't she doing well! :coolface:
    • spid3rix
      spid3rix
      Bronze
      Joined: 24.01.2011 Posts: 236
      Homework 4

      Question 1: Post a hand for evaluation where you have the initiative post-flop.

      AJs UTG1 NL5

      Question 2: Evaluate one of the hands submitted by other members.

      NL10 SH - Overpair vs minraise in paired flop

      Question 3: You are on the flop with K :spade: Q :diamond: . The board cards are J :spade: , 9 :club: , 8 :heart: , and your opponent holds 7 :club: 7 :heart: . What is your equity in this spot?

      Equity Win Tie
      41.41% 41.41% 0.00% K :spade: Q :diamond:
      58.59% 58.59% 0.00% 7 :heart: 7 :club:
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good job! Homework #2 Done!

      I totally agree with your thoughts about raising PPs. On higher limits it's even strongly recommend to play it that way. :) So rather take the habit on early limits than do it too late and get a bad habit of limping them.

      About Question #3:

             Equity     Win     Tie
      UTG    46.32%  37.92%   8.41% { AKo }
      UTG+1  53.68%  45.27%   8.41% { 88+, AJs+, KQs, AKo }

      Hopefully you enjoy the School so far. Some more points earned.
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good job! Homework #3 Done!

      About Question #1:
      Preflop Equity:

             Equity     Win     Tie
      UTG    50.78%  50.40%   0.38% { KsQs }
      UTG+1  49.22%  48.84%   0.38% { 3d3c }


      Postflop Equity:

      Board: J:spade: 5:diamond: 3:spade:
             Equity     Win     Tie
      UTG    26.46%  26.46%   0.00% { KsQs }
      UTG+1  73.54%  73.54%   0.00% { 3d3c }


      About Question #3:
      There are few situations on turn:
      a) If we take just odds for the FD and we take into account that all our odds are clean. There which means:
      Total Pot = $0,91 ; We have to Call = $0,22 -> According to that it means we are getting ~4,16:1 odds. For flushdraw we would need 4:1. Which tells us that we are getting perfect odds.
      b) If we consider the opponent having sets here:
      Which means we have to discount outs, for example 6 and also 3. Which means we have 7 clean outs. Which means that we need 6:1 odds. That tells us that we need ~$0,41 on river to make it profitable. If we expect the opponent being loose enough and being able to pay us no-matter what then we can do the Call here properly.
      c) We might even have overcards as outs or even 4 as a out:
      Although this kind of situation ain't that likely. I'd rather discount that one and either pick a) or b). Most likely towards Call.

      You are doing great progress! Some more points earned.
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good job! Homework #4 Done!

      This weeks homework was a bit easier. But the idea of that is to help you go through last weeks stuff if you didn't go through everything. Or either way maybe even read some more articles, watch some videos and of course attend in the coaching. What will also help for your game is the evaluation part of other members hands and of course posting your own hands.

      If you have interests you could try calculating the equity with a formula which you can use even on tables(either playing online or live poker):
      (Amount of outs x 4) – (Amount of outs – 8) = Your Equity

      About Question #3:

      Board: J:spade: 9:club: 8:heart:
             Equity     Win     Tie
      UTG    41.41%  41.41%   0.00% { KsQd }
      UTG+1  58.59%  58.59%   0.00% { 7h7c }

      Hopefully this wasn't too easy homework for you. Some more points earned.
    • spid3rix
      spid3rix
      Bronze
      Joined: 24.01.2011 Posts: 236
      Homework 5

      Question 1: Post a hand for evaluation where you have based your decisions on the stats of your opponents.

      Nl5 99 Co

      Question 2: Evaluate one of the hands submitted by other members.

      NL10 SH - Overpair vs minraise in paired flop

      Question 3: Consider the following situation:

      $10 NL Hold'em (7 handed)

      Stacks & Stats:
      UTG ($10)
      MP ($8)
      MP2 ($9)
      CO ($10)
      Hero($10)
      SB ($10) (17/13/2.6/24/1212) [VPIP/PFR/AF/WTS/Hands]
      BB ($10) (27/9/2.0/29/333) [VPIP/PFR/AF/WTS/Hands]

      Preflop: Hero is BU with 6 :diamond: , 7 :diamond:
      4 folds, Hero raises to $0.40, SB calls $0.40, BB calls $0.40

      Flop: ($1.20) 3 :diamond: , 3 :heart: , T :diamond: (3 players)
      SB checks, BB checks, Hero checks

      Turn: ($1.20) J :diamond: (3 players)
      SB bets $1.00, BB calls $1.00, Hero...

      What action would you take, and why?

      I would definitely raise in this spot. We have a strong hand ( a flush) and we want to protect our hand, but weaker hands to call our bet. According to the stats SB is a rather tight player and probably he hit the jack on the board and BB since he is a looser player he is probably on a FD. Our raise will be 6$. This way will not give BB the chance to call with the right odds.
      So the right move on this turn will be raise/call shove.

      Question 4: Consider the following situation:

      $10 NL Hold'em (8 handed)

      Stacks & Stats
      UTG ($8)
      MP ($10)
      MP2 ($9)
      MP3 ($6)
      Hero ($10)
      BU ($10) (25/21/3.8/26/1250) [VPIP/PFR/AF/WTS/Hands]
      SB ($10)
      BB ($10)

      Preflop: Hero is CO with J :heart: , J :spade:
      4 folds, Hero raises to $0.40, BU 3-bets to $1.30, 2 folds, Hero calls $1.30

      Flop: ($2.75) 6 :heart: , 9 :spade: , T :club: (2 players)
      Hero...

      What action would you take, and why?

      Villain is a loose aggressive player. He 3bet-ed his hand and he showed strength and aggression preflop. The best move in my opinion is check/raise in this spot since villain has AF 3.8; it is very likely that he will continue his aggression on the flop.
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good Job! Homework #5 Done!

      About Task #3
      It's a very close decision: does protection or pot control weigh heavier here? Do you want to protect against hands like 3x or A:dx and K:dx? Or do you want to control the pot size and try to induce a bluff on the river in case there is no T, no J and no additional ?

      Raise/fold is out of question - with the given pot size and the good made hand you have, it can't even be considered.

      In case you decide to go broke, you can't really be blamed either. It's not a sign of weakness that the rather tight small blind decides to bet into two people here, though. I would say a call is to be slightly favored, while the many outs against you are annoying. The big blind who calls rather loosely speaks in favor of a raise/broke again. Both options are finally considered equal, which shows - all things considered - how close and full of variance these spots really are.

      About Task #4
      You've called pre-flop and then hit a good board. You basically have two choices now: either you assume that your opponent will go broke loosely or puts you on a bluff often and you thus check/raise - or you play check/call in the spirit of way ahead / way behind. The problem with the latter is that there are a lot of cards you don't want to see in the later course of the hand. All in all, it depends on your balancing as both lines make sense under certain circumstances.

      A check/fold would be really pointless, of course. It's hard to say whether you should donk-bet here; donk/fold can be discarded as that would turn your hand into a pure bluff and your opponent would interpret this as weakness and start raising you out of flops with hands like AK/AQ/air. So, if you want to donk-bet, it has to be a donk/3-bet.

      Good luck on tables and with the School. Some more points earned.
    • spid3rix
      spid3rix
      Bronze
      Joined: 24.01.2011 Posts: 236
      Homework 6

      Question 1: Post a hand for evaluation where you have either a) freeplay, b) slowplay, or c) multi-way pot situation.

      NL2 FR 65o BB Bad play

      Question 2: Evaluate one of the hands submitted by other members.

      NL2 implied


      Question 3: Consider the following situation:
      $25 NL Hold'em (10 handed)

      The situat

      Stacks & Stats

      UTG ($25)
      UTG+1 ($25) rock
      UTG+2 ($25)
      MP1 ($25)
      MP2 ($25) LAG
      MP3 ($25) maniac
      CO ($25)
      Hero BU ($25)
      SB ($25)
      BB ($25) calling station

      Preflop: Hero is BU with Q :heart: , J :heart:
      5 folds, MP3 raises $1.00, CO calls $1.00, Hero calls $1.00, 1 fold, BB calls $1.00

      Flop: ($4.10) 3 :heart: , J :club: , A :diamond: (4 players)
      BB checks, MP3 checks, CO checks, Hero checks

      Turn: ($4.10) Q :club: (4 players)
      BB bets $2.05, 2 folds, Hero...?

      What action would you take, and why?

      To take a specific action, I think we should see what range does the BB have. The range is dependent to the opponent's style of play. The question is if he is able to squeeze preflop because preflop is the perfect situation for a squeeze. Anyway, if we don't have any stats on him we will give him the standard range: 22+, Ax+, broadways. Flop is a rather dry board. This kind of board is perfect for the preflop agressor. First info we have on villain on the flop is that he checks. He might do this with a weak hand or he might check trapping the preflop aggressor. On turn, he decides to bet, but the size of his bet is only half the pot. This situation in my opinion I think it is a situation far behind, far ahead and we don't have any info where we might stand in the hand. That is why we should raise here (the size of the raise shoould be at least 12 BB) and fold if the villain shoves (shove range will be: KT, AJ, AQ, AcKc, 33, JJ, QQ, AA, and maybe AKo depending on the player and against this range we are far behind - 23%). On river, we will have to reevaluate if he decides to call.
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good Job! Homework #6 Done!

      About Question #3:
      Two lines can quickly be discarded here: fold and raise/fold; your hand is simply too strong for those alternatives.

      It's hard to assess whether you should put in a raise here. When a rather passive player decides to bet into three players while being out of position, it does look strong. It's more likely an indication of a made hand than that of a draw.

      A raise naturally protects, but you run the risk of isolating yourself against very strong range. Which weaker hands could your opponent possibly continue playing here?

      The deciding factor finally comes in the size of the pot. This tiny pot simply isn't worth putting yourself into a tough spot where you could potentially end up risking your entire stack. A raise would be overplayed here and pot control takes the precedent over protection.

      Best of Luck on the tables and with the Course. Some more points earned.