brooksjohn

  • 19 replies
    • UPAY4DINNER
      UPAY4DINNER
      Bronze
      Joined: 27.09.2009 Posts: 21,921
      Hey brooksjohn,

      Welcome to the NL Beginners Course :)

      I'm sure with plenty of help from our coaching team we will help you improve your cash game ;)

      Don't forget to post your first homework to get the ball rolling.

      I wish you every success,

      Kind regards,
      Gary
    • brooksjohn
      brooksjohn
      Bronze
      Joined: 23.08.2010 Posts: 144
      Hi, I've been watching the podcast of the week 1 coaching. The coach is demonstrating a forum that I can't find:

      Forum >> Beginners Poker School >> Classroom
    • brooksjohn
      brooksjohn
      Bronze
      Joined: 23.08.2010 Posts: 144
      Question 1: What is your motivation for playing poker?

      It’s an engrossing and fun hobby that I hope to make a little money from long term.

      Question 2: What are your weaknesses when playing poker?

      Playing moderate hands (AQ, AJ, KQ etc.) badly, I always seem to have the worst hand - but only just. I also really struggle to accurately assess opponents’ ranges. I seem to frequently get trapped by villains slow playing big pairs, I’m sure that this does not happen anywhere near as often as I think but it nearly always tilts me.

      Question 3: What does it mean to play tight aggressive?

      To play tight aggressive it to only play premium or good hands, preferably in position, to frequently raise and seldom limp/call.
    • tofu22
      tofu22
      Bronze
      Joined: 18.10.2008 Posts: 659
      hello john the first coaching was probably from the first school that ended so the classroom doesn't exist anymore, that's why you can't find it. :D
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good job! Homework #1 Done!

      Hi, I've been watching the podcast of the week 1 coaching. The coach is demonstrating a forum that I can't find:

      Now the classroom is Hand Evaluation forums. :) It's from the old school.

      Most of the weakness you wrote can easily be fixed with you posting hands (analyzing your session). We will start writing feedback to your play. Usually negative feedback will put you into thinking phase and trying to fix all those leaks. It's almost the same as you lose money, you will remember it more than winning part. By this situation it's gonna be that negative feedback you gonna remember and try to avoid them next time.

      Easiest way to fight against tilt is to set up stop-loss technique. Which means if you for example have lost more than 3BIs for a session then you just stop the session for some time. The BI amount is set up from your own results. Some may put it higher, some lower. Also after the stop you can spend some time with evaluation part to become better.

      Welcome to the Course and Best of Luck. Some more points earned.
    • brooksjohn
      brooksjohn
      Bronze
      Joined: 23.08.2010 Posts: 144
      Hi,

      The BSS states that one should always buy-in for 100 BB so that's $2 at the smallest stakes (NL2). I assumed that this would be the most one could buy-in for but on iPoker it is possible to buy-in for $5 (250BB).

      Is there any benefit in buying in for more than 100BB?
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      The BSS states that one should always buy-in for 100 BB so that's $2 at the smallest stakes (NL2). I assumed that this would be the most one could buy-in for but on iPoker it is possible to buy-in for $5 (250BB).

      Well, if you rather started with poker and ain't that confident in preflop/postflop play then I would advice to keep to 100BB than being very deep. Being very deep you just have a bigger variance and most likely will do more mistakes in difficult decisions. Later on when you get more confident then you can as well even buy-in with bigger amount.

      Is there any benefit in buying in for more than 100BB?

      Yes, you wont face difficult situations being 250BB deep and wont loose that much money from your stack. Some reasons are mention above.
    • brooksjohn
      brooksjohn
      Bronze
      Joined: 23.08.2010 Posts: 144
      Question 1: What do you think you could play differently than suggested in the BSS Starting Hands Chart and why?

      I think that there is some contradictory advice in the SHC. I don’t understand why, for example, KQs in MP should be folded if all players fold but called in one player calls. Also there is no recommendation for “more than one player called” at all, even though this is a common occurrence.
      I have noted that a lot of other members have commented here regarding opening ranges for blind stealing, but I wonder if this is really beneficial given the tiny blinds. I do think that a chart for re-stealing would be useful though.

      Question 2: Do you have questions about your preflop play? Post your hand for evaluation.

      This hand is an illustration of my comments above.

      KQs MP1



      Question 3: What is the equity of AKo against the top 5% range? 5% means 88+, AJs+, KQs, AKo.

      46.32%. My interpretation of this is that I will lose slightly more often than I win.
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good job! Homework #2 Done!

      I think that there is some contradictory advice in the SHC. I don’t understand why, for example, KQs in MP should be folded if all players fold but called in one player calls. Also there is no recommendation for “more than one player called” at all, even though this is a common occurrence.

      Well, the basic reason for that is SHC tries to teach you basic preflop/postflop play with playing very few hands which are easy to play postflop and most likely playing it IP rather than OOP. Of course when you get more experienced then you can as well play those kind of hands.

      Blind stealing can be very profitable. It's not only the blind stealing but as well it's the BU play while you have position. If you are a good player postflop then you can earn solid winning from the LP hands while you have the position. Also if you just steal the blinds it will be still good enough even if the blinds are small. On smaller limits you wont recognize the difference but imagine the blinds being for example $0,50/$1.

      About Question #3:

             Equity     Win     Tie
      UTG    46.32%  37.92%   8.41% { AKo }
      UTG+1  53.68%  45.27%   8.41% { 88+, AJs+, KQs, AKo }


      Hopefully you enjoy the School so far. Some more points earned.
    • brooksjohn
      brooksjohn
      Bronze
      Joined: 23.08.2010 Posts: 144
      Hi, Please can you clear up the following.

      If I have an OESD on the flop my odds are 2:1 against with two cards to come. So if the pot is $9 I can only call if it costs less than $3.

      I'm OK with this so far but my confusion comes with the river when the card is neutral i.e. I still have and OESD but with just one card to come.

      Do I still apply the same odds as before (2:1) as I was drawing from the flop or do I apply the true odds at this point (5:1) as there is only one more card.

      If it is the latter this means that I will call a lot on the flop, but often fold on the turn given that normal betting patterns apply.
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      If I have an OESD on the flop my odds are 2:1 against with two cards to come. So if the pot is $9 I can only call if it costs less than $3.

      No, if only one card to come is your odds are 5:1. Which means implied odds come into handy here and you can decide either you get the implied odds or not from the opponent. So if the pot is $9 and opponent bets $3 this means your implied odds are $3 on turn which needs to be correct Call. You need $3 in further play from him to make it correct break-even Call.

      I'm OK with this so far but my confusion comes with the river when the card is neutral i.e. I still have and OESD but with just one card to come.

      Open the odds chart, there is one column for 2 streets and one is for 1 street.

      Do I still apply the same odds as before (2:1) as I was drawing from the flop or do I apply the true odds at this point (5:1) as there is only one more card.

      Explained in early question. 5:1 = 1 card to come and 2:1 = 2 cards to come.
    • brooksjohn
      brooksjohn
      Bronze
      Joined: 23.08.2010 Posts: 144
      Hi, I'm sorry to labour the point but it's important that I understand this fully. I have prepared a sample hand below please can you confimr that my actions, based on pot odds, are correct.

      I have Th9h in BU blinds are $0.5/$1 (easy to calculate)
      EP Limp, MP Limp, I call, SB calls, BB checks, all others fold
      Pot = $5
      Flop 7d8c3s
      SB checks, BB bets $3, EP folds, MP calls $3
      Pot will be $14, I need to call $3 to stay in so pot odds are 14:3 or 4.66:1. The Odds chart states that with 2 cards to come the odds against my draw hitting is 2:1 so I call the $3.
      SB folds so pot is $14.
      Turn is 2d
      BB bets $7, MP calls
      Pot will be $28 if I call, cost to stay in is $7 so pot odds are 28:7 or 4:1.
      Ignoring implied odds I fold because the odds against are 5:1 with one card to come.
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      On flop
      Pot = $5
      Bet + Call = $3 + $3 = $6
      For us to Call = $3

      So for us possible winnings $5+$6 = $11, which gives us $11:$3 = 3,67:1 odds. Although that doesn't mean that we have wrong odds to Call. We base here for the implied odds, so in case we do hit our straight we will get paid in future on. Which means if we hit on turn we need ~$4 from him to make the Call profitable in long run.
    • brooksjohn
      brooksjohn
      Bronze
      Joined: 23.08.2010 Posts: 144
      Question 0: Download and install the Equilab.
      Done!


      Question 1: You are holding K Q . What is your preflop equityagainst an opponent who has 3 3 ? How does the equity change on this flop: J 5 3 ?

      Preflop Equity Win Tie
      UTG 50.78% 50.40% 0.38% { KsQs }
      UTG+1 49.22% 48.84% 0.38% { 3d3c }

      Post-flop:
      Board: 5dJs3s
      Equity Win Tie
      UTG 26.46% 26.46% 0.00% { KsQs }
      UTG+1 73.54% 73.54% 0.00% { 3d3c }

      Pre-flop KsQs is marginally the better hand, but equity takes a nosedive on the flop.

      Question 2: What would you do in the following hand? (Remember that it is important to explain your reasons, simply posting "Fold" or "Call" isn't enough!)

      No Limit hold'em $2 (9-handed)
      Players and stacks:
      UTG: $2.00
      UTG+1: $2.08
      MP1: $1.92
      MP2: $1.00
      MP3: $3.06
      CO: (Hero) $2.08
      BU: $2.00
      SB: $2.00
      BB: $1.24
      Preflop: Hero is CO with A J
      5 folds, Hero raises to $0.08, BU calls $0.08, SB folds, BB calls $0.06.
      Flop: ($0.25) 2 6 3 (3 players)
      BB checks, Hero checks, BU checks.
      Turn: ($0.25) 5 (3 players)
      BB checks, Hero bets $0.22, BU raises to $0.44, BB folds, Hero...?

      From a purely pot odds point of view hero should call as pot odds are 4.14:1 which is (just) enough for a flush draw (4:1 required)

      Hero’s break even equity is 19.47%. If we narrow villains range to 44-55 on the assumption that these are the only hands he is likely to have called, checked, raised then hero’s equity for this hand is 20.45% so it’s a marginal call.

      Board: 6d3d2c5c
      Equity Win Tie
      CO 20.45% 18.18% 2.27% { AcJc }
      BB 79.55% 77.27% 2.27% { 55-44 }

      If we include all worst flush draws in villains range then it’s an easy call.

      Board: 6d3d2c5c
      Equity Win Tie
      CO 40.04% 37.43% 2.61% { AcJc }
      BB 59.96% 57.35% 2.61% { 55-44, KcQc, KcTc, Kc9c, Kc8c, Kc7c, Kc6c, Kc5c, Kc4c, Kc3c, Kc2c }


      Question 3: Do you have questions about your postflop play? Post your hand for evaluation.

      I’ve posted a couple of hands that I think are interesting or could have been played differently.

      K5o in BB - flopped set

      AKs on BU - shoved flop
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good job! Homework #3 Done!

      About Question #1:
      Preflop Equity:

             Equity     Win     Tie
      UTG    50.78%  50.40%   0.38% { KsQs }
      UTG+1  49.22%  48.84%   0.38% { 3d3c }


      Postflop Equity:

      Board: J:spade: 5:diamond: 3:spade:
             Equity     Win     Tie
      UTG    26.46%  26.46%   0.00% { KsQs }
      UTG+1  73.54%  73.54%   0.00% { 3d3c }


      About Question #2:
      There are few situations on turn:
      a) If we take just odds for the FD and we take into account that all our odds are clean. There which means:
      Total Pot = $0,91 ; We have to Call = $0,22 -> According to that it means we are getting ~4,16:1 odds. For flushdraw we would need 4:1. Which tells us that we are getting perfect odds.
      b) If we consider the opponent having sets here:
      Which means we have to discount outs, for example 6 and also 3. Which means we have 7 clean outs. Which means that we need 6:1 odds. That tells us that we need ~$0,41 on river to make it profitable. If we expect the opponent being loose enough and being able to pay us no-matter what then we can do the Call here properly.
      c) We might even have overcards as outs or even 4 as a out:
      Although this kind of situation ain't that likely. I'd rather discount that one and either pick a) or b). Most likely towards Call.

      You are doing great progress! Some more points earned.
    • brooksjohn
      brooksjohn
      Bronze
      Joined: 23.08.2010 Posts: 144
      Question 1: Post a hand for evaluation in which you have the initiative postflop.

      NL2 - A6o - Flopped 2 pair

      Question 2: Evaluate one of the hands submitted by other members.

      NL2 KK with hard decision on Turn

      Question 3: You are on the flop with K Q . The board cards are J , 9 , 8 , and your opponent holds 7 7 . What is your equity in this spot?


      Board: 8:heart: J:spade: 9:club:
      Equity Win Tie
      UTG 41.41% 41.41% 0.00% { KsQd }
      UTG+1 58.59% 58.59% 0.00% { 7h7c }
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good job! Homework #4 Done!

      This weeks homework was a bit easier. But the idea of that is to help you go through last weeks stuff if you didn't go through everything. Or either way maybe even read some more articles, watch some videos and of course attend in the coaching. What will also help for your game is the evaluation part of other members hands and of course posting your own hands.

      If you have interests you could try calculating the equity with a formula which you can use even on tables(either playing online or live poker):
      (Amount of outs x 4) – (Amount of outs – 8) = Your Equity

      About Question #3:

      Board: J:spade: 9:club: 8:heart:
             Equity     Win     Tie
      UTG    41.41%  41.41%   0.00% { KsQd }
      UTG+1  58.59%  58.59%   0.00% { 7h7c }

      Hopefully this wasn't too easy homework for you. Some more points earned.
    • brooksjohn
      brooksjohn
      Bronze
      Joined: 23.08.2010 Posts: 144
      Question 1: Post a hand for evaluation where you have based your decisions on the stats of your opponents.

      ATo in BB - fold to BU raise

      Question 2: Evaluate one of the hands submitted by other members.

      JJ vs short stack

      Question 3: Consider the following situation:
      $10 NL Hold'em (8-handed)
      Stacks & Stats
      UTG ($8)
      MP ($10)
      MP2 ($9)
      MP3 ($6)
      Hero ($10)
      BU ($10) (25/21/3.8/26/1250) [VPIP/PFR/AF/WTS/Hands]
      SB ($10)
      BB ($10)
      Preflop: Hero is CO with Jh , Js
      4 folds, Hero raises to $0.40, BU 3-bets to $1.30, 2 folds, Hero calls $1.30
      Flop: ($2.75) 6h , 9s , Tc (2 players)
      Hero..

      What action would you take, and why?

      It depends very much on villains pre-flop 3-bet range. Against his normal PFR we have about 65% equity but his 3-bet range is probably much tighter than this. If we give him a 3-bet range of 5% then our equity is about 50/50.

      In this situationI would probably donk-bet for a little over half the pot and fold to a re-raise.
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good Job! Homework #5 Done!

      About Task #4
      You've called pre-flop and then hit a good board. You basically have two choices now: either you assume that your opponent will go broke loosely or puts you on a bluff often and you thus check/raise - or you play check/call in the spirit of way ahead / way behind. The problem with the latter is that there are a lot of cards you don't want to see in the later course of the hand. All in all, it depends on your balancing as both lines make sense under certain circumstances.

      A check/fold would be really pointless, of course. It's hard to say whether you should donk-bet here; donk/fold can be discarded as that would turn your hand into a pure bluff and your opponent would interpret this as weakness and start raising you out of flops with hands like AK/AQ/air. So, if you want to donk-bet, it has to be a donk/3-bet.

      Good luck on tables and with the School. Some more points earned.