StraGus

  • 29 replies
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Hello StraGus,

      Also welcome to the course! The next things you need to do it to start with the homework which you will find here: http://www.pokerstrategy.com/strategy/bss/1992/1/.

      Start with Week #1 and follow them and post the homeworks into this thread. :)

      Wanna add anything about yourself, how long have you been playing poker, where you come from and etc? :)

      Best Regards.
    • StraGus
      StraGus
      Bronze
      Joined: 23.03.2009 Posts: 123
      Question 1: What is your motivation for playing poker?

      I am 31 years old and have played poker for 4 years now. Both online and at homegames. I have won some money but not a lot. Most by bonus and rakeback...
      My motivation is primarily the challenge of beating the game (and my opponents:-) ). I think I have spent more time reading, studying and making charts than actually playing.
      Of course I would like to make a little money from this hobby, but it is not at all the most important part.
      I have always played holdEm No Limit cash games. In the beginning full ring 10 players but later 6 max. Started at micro but moved up to NL50 and was doing okay.
      I stopped a year ago because I started loosing and didn't have the time for it at the moment.
      I have previously bought pokertracker, pokerstove and other tools and tried to implement them without much success.

      Now I am ready to give it another try:-) I don't have a bankroll, but think this is fine as I am looking forward to the struggle of building one from scratch all the way from the micro limits.
      I would like to focus on full ring cash games as I think this game is more to my style as I like to keep it to the tight side and don't think I am aggressive enough for the 6 max games.

      Question 2: What are your weaknesses when playing poker?

      I like to play by a plan or set code. I think it is very nice to use preflop charts and have tried to figure lines for many hands postflop in order to find a bulletproof way to play in order to crack the game.
      Because of this I am not good at adapting to different situations. I am also too passive postflop.
      I actually thought I was a meduim/good player - but then I tried to take one of your beginners test and scored very low:-)
      I think Im very good preflop (in standard situations) as I have made a lot of preflop charts and am completely familiar by your chart by now.

      Question 3: What does it mean to play tight aggressive?

      It is very difficult to describe in a few words.. But I think I would say that playing Tight/aggressive is about keeping to few good hands before entering the pot. And when you finally decide to enter, then you play it fast by betting and putting pressure on your opponents in order to put them in difficult situations.

      Kasper
    • StraGus
      StraGus
      Bronze
      Joined: 23.03.2009 Posts: 123
      Hello again.

      Should I wait for the comments on my homework for lesson 1 before moving on?
      Or can I begin to look a little on Lesson 2 now:-)

      Kasper
    • StraGus
      StraGus
      Bronze
      Joined: 23.03.2009 Posts: 123
      Hello.
      I was too eager to move on so here are the homework for lesson 2:-)

      Question 1: What do you think you could play differently than suggested in the BSS Starting Hands Chart and why?

      I think that you could play a lot of hands which are not mentioned in the chart - if you were a better player. Especially in late position and for isolation against weaker players.
      As for me personally at the moment I think I could play a little more hands. I have a hard time folding AQs in middle position against a limp before me.
      I would also like to raise a limper when I am in late position with KQs.

      I think that limping first in with small pocket pairs is a bit obvious for my opponents. But on the other hand it is working perfect:-) I have followed the BSS exactly in order to play the way you advertise for a beginner - so I is hard to argue against when I am winning:-)

      Question 2: Do you have questions about your preflop play? Post your hand for evaluation.

      I played a hand with QQ in position and made a weak fold i think. This is one of my big problems as I wrote in Lesson 1 Homework. I am to passive/weak postflop.
      Looking forward to hear what you think.

      Link: Weak fold with QQ?

      Question 3: What is the equity of AKo against the top 5% range? 5% means 88+, AJs+, KQs, AKo.

      I have downloaded the Equilab and put in the data.
      I find that AKo has a equity of 46.32% against the top 5% range.

      That is a bit surprising though. Would have thought it was better. That is maybe why you tell us only to move All In with AA and KK pre flop..

      Kasper
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good job! Homework #1 Done!

      You can post the homeworks whenever you want. Even if I haven't answered the previous one.

      Well, just following the chart wont help you beating a lot higher limits. Where you will adjust the hands according your opponents. For that reason I would advice you to try out adjusting if you ever want to move up to higher limits. Of course it's fine to follow the chart on lower limits, although it will be hard on higher limits to win by just following the chart. Of course it's still possible but most likely would not win that much.

      Good to hear that you "think" you are good preflop. But trust me, there will be a lot of situations where you either overplay your premium hands like JJ/QQ or AK. We can still figure that out in future if you post your hands. :)

      Tight style is usually called playing rather few hands. Like following the Starting Hand Chart. Aggressive should be also pretty clear that already the word says how you should be playing. But the problem playing aggressively is that you have to watch that you don't play too aggressive. Find good spots, find good targets. About The tight-aggressive strategy you can read in this article: "What is the Big Stack Strategy?"

      Welcome to the Course and Best of Luck. Some more points earned.
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good job! Homework #2 Done!

      Totally agree with you about the stealing ranges. They can be very easily be balanced with even wider range. Depending on the opponent you can as well put a wider stealing range. Against some shorties you can even steal with smaller raise. But don't overdo the stealing situations. Sometimes you might just put yourself into too many difficult spots if opening with marginal hands.

      I don't mind at all playing those hands as AQs/KQs, why not? But usually try to take the initiative by which I mean raise them up if there are limps before you. :)

      About Question #3:

             Equity     Win     Tie
      UTG    46.32%  37.92%   8.41% { AKo }
      UTG+1  53.68%  45.27%   8.41% { 88+, AJs+, KQs, AKo }


      Hopefully you enjoy the School so far. Some more points earned.
    • StraGus
      StraGus
      Bronze
      Joined: 23.03.2009 Posts: 123
      Hello again.

      And thank you for your comments Veriz.
      Here are my homework for lesson 3

      Question 1: You are holding KsQs. What is your preflop equity against an opponent who has 3d3c? How does the equity change on this flop: Js5d3s?


      Using Equilab:

      My equity preflop: 50.78 %
      My equity on the flop: 26.46 %


      Question 2: What would you do in the following hand?

      Think I would have made a c-bet on the flop. Even against two opponents. I usually c-bet with 3 cards below 8 (I know the flop are somewhat connected but I like to know where I stand on the flop)

      My first thought is to call on turn:-) But lets analyze:
      (would have been nice with your excel form from the coaching now:-) - can I find it somewhere?)

      Hero has to call 0.22 in a pot of 0.25+0.22+0.44= 0.91 giving a total pot of 0.91+0.22 = 1.13.
      Equity= 0.22/1.13 = 19.47 %

      Now for villains hand range:
      55-44, A4s,87s,65s,43s, AcQc,KcQc,QcJc,AcTc,JcTc,Ac9c,Tc9c,Ac8c,9c8c,Ac7c,Ac5c,Ac3c,Ac2c

      PP: Think he would have RR PF with high PP's and bet flop with overpairs or sets for protection. Its a small raise if he has 55...

      A4s: He has hit the straight and wants to raise even if its a small raise. Maybe he has a FD also in clubs or3 diamonds

      Ax clubs: Think he would RR PF with AcKc and bet Ac6c on flop. Hero has AcJc)

      34s: Hit an OESD + pair and wants to raise.
      56s: Hit two pairs and wants to raise. Small raise however
      78s: Hit OESD and wants to raise.

      Sc clubs: Picks up a FD and wants to raise.

      Would have raised with 23s and 45s on flop for protection and value.

      Some of these hands would be weak calls PF but you never know...:-)

      Against this range we have equity: 37.03 % and can call.

      Dont think we can push him off with a ReRaise.

      Question 3: Do you have questions about your postflop play? Post your hand for evaluation.

      Here is a hand posted for eveluation. It is a situation I often have difficulties to just lay down my hand.

      NL 2. FR. Fold ed overpair to c-bet - weak?.


      One last question. I cant see the points you have given me anywhere. Do I just have to be patient or do I need to do anything more? Hoping to reach silver at a point:-)

      Looking forward to your comments.

      Kasper
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good job! Homework #3 Done!

      About Question #1:
      Preflop Equity:

             Equity     Win     Tie
      UTG    50.78%  50.40%   0.38% { KsQs }
      UTG+1  49.22%  48.84%   0.38% { 3d3c }


      Postflop Equity:

      Board: J:spade: 5:diamond: 3:spade:
             Equity     Win     Tie
      UTG    26.46%  26.46%   0.00% { KsQs }
      UTG+1  73.54%  73.54%   0.00% { 3d3c }


      About Question #2:
      There are few situations on turn:
      a) If we take just odds for the FD and we take into account that all our odds are clean. There which means:
      Total Pot = $0,91 ; We have to Call = $0,22 -> According to that it means we are getting ~4,16:1 odds. For flushdraw we would need 4:1. Which tells us that we are getting perfect odds.
      b) If we consider the opponent having sets here:
      Which means we have to discount outs, for example 6 and also 3. Which means we have 7 clean outs. Which means that we need 6:1 odds. That tells us that we need ~$0,41 on river to make it profitable. If we expect the opponent being loose enough and being able to pay us no-matter what then we can do the Call here properly.
      c) We might even have overcards as outs or even 4 as a out:
      Although this kind of situation ain't that likely. I'd rather discount that one and either pick a) or b). Most likely towards Call.


      One last question. I cant see the points you have given me anywhere. Do I just have to be patient or do I need to do anything more? Hoping to reach silver at a point:-)

      Well, actually they ain't the Strategy Points. :( For those points you still have to play tracked. They are points for passing the Course.

      You are doing great progress, keep going!
    • StraGus
      StraGus
      Bronze
      Joined: 23.03.2009 Posts: 123
      Question 1: Post a hand for evaluation where you have based your decisions on the stats of your opponents.


      NL 2. Overplayed JJ?

      Question 2: Evaluate one of the hands submitted by other members.

      Nl10 Fr Jj Utg2

      Question 3: Consider the following situation:

      I would c-bet flop. We could take it down on flop. And if not then we have a flushdraw and backdoor straghtdraw. Could be good even though the board is paired.
      On turn I would raise to see where we stand. We have a small flush and dont want another diamond.
      If someone raise we have a tough decision as the bord is paired...
      Think iI would go broke here..

      Question 4: Consider the following situation:

      Dont think I would call the 3-bet PF. From the stats Villain seems like a reasonable player and I would wait for a better spot. We are also OOP.

      On turn I would bet out to see where we stand. I would fold to a Raise.


      Looking forward to hear your comments:-)

      Kasper
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good Job! Homework #5 Done!

      By the way, first things first. :> Seems like you skipped Homework #4? :(


      About Task #3
      It's a very close decision: does protection or pot control weigh heavier here? Do you want to protect against hands like 3x or A:dx and K:dx? Or do you want to control the pot size and try to induce a bluff on the river in case there is no T, no J and no additional ?

      Raise/fold is out of question - with the given pot size and the good made hand you have, it can't even be considered.

      In case you decide to go broke, you can't really be blamed either. It's not a sign of weakness that the rather tight small blind decides to bet into two people here, though. I would say a call is to be slightly favored, while the many outs against you are annoying. The big blind who calls rather loosely speaks in favor of a raise/broke again. Both options are finally considered equal, which shows - all things considered - how close and full of variance these spots really are.

      About Task #4
      You've called pre-flop and then hit a good board. You basically have two choices now: either you assume that your opponent will go broke loosely or puts you on a bluff often and you thus check/raise - or you play check/call in the spirit of way ahead / way behind. The problem with the latter is that there are a lot of cards you don't want to see in the later course of the hand. All in all, it depends on your balancing as both lines make sense under certain circumstances.

      A check/fold would be really pointless, of course. It's hard to say whether you should donk-bet here; donk/fold can be discarded as that would turn your hand into a pure bluff and your opponent would interpret this as weakness and start raising you out of flops with hands like AK/AQ/air. So, if you want to donk-bet, it has to be a donk/3-bet.

      Good luck on tables and with the School. Some more points earned.
    • StraGus
      StraGus
      Bronze
      Joined: 23.03.2009 Posts: 123
      Ups.
      You are right. I almost forgot the homework for lesson 4. Here are my answers:

      Question 1: Post a hand for evaluation in which you have the initiative postflop.

      NL 2 AQs line


      Question 2: Evaluate one of the hands submitted by other members.


      call or fold?

      Hmm. I was totally wrong here... Not good.. Much to learn obviously. I dont think I would play the hand preflop, so hopefully I will not get in a position like this ofthen...

      Question 3: You are on the flop with KQ. The board cards are J, 9, 8, and your opponent holds 77. What is your equity in this spot?

      I have used Equilab and found:

      Board: 8hJs9c
      Equity Win Tie
      MP2 41.41% 41.41% 0.00% { KsQd }
      MP3 58.59% 58.59% 0.00% { 7h7c }


      Looking forward to your comments.
      Am a bit worried I had the last question for lesson 5 homework quite wrong. This is one of my big leaks I think.

      Kasper
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good job! Homework #4 Done!

      About Homework #5, well that's why the homeworks are for. :) We learn from mistakes here.

      This weeks homework was a bit easier. But the idea of that is to help you go through last weeks stuff if you didn't go through everything. Or either way maybe even read some more articles, watch some videos and of course attend in the coaching. What will also help for your game is the evaluation part of other members hands and of course posting your own hands.

      If you have interests you could try calculating the equity with a formula which you can use even on tables(either playing online or live poker):
      (Amount of outs x 4) – (Amount of outs – 8) = Your Equity

      About Question #3:

      Board: J:spade: 9:club: 8:heart:
             Equity     Win     Tie
      UTG    41.41%  41.41%   0.00% { KsQd }
      UTG+1  58.59%  58.59%   0.00% { 7h7c }

      Hopefully this wasn't too easy homework for you. Some more points earned.
    • StraGus
      StraGus
      Bronze
      Joined: 23.03.2009 Posts: 123
      Hi again.
      And thank you very much for your comments and your encouragements:-)
      I think it is very hard to avoid mistakes post flop when I am playing.
      But I think I am improving:-) During the course I have made my initial 10 usd grow to 50 :-)
      (I know I am not supposed to look at short term results - but anyway its nice:-))

      Here is the homework for lesson 6:

      Question 1: Post a hand for evaluation where you have either a) freeplay, b) slowplay, or c) multi-way pot situation.

      N 2. I was the Calling Station

      Question 2: Evaluate one of the hands submitted by other members.

      Nl2 44

      Question 3: Consider the following situation:

      PF: I usually only call this kind of hand if its a min raise or if there are 2 callers before me.

      Flop: I would check here as well.

      Turn: Here I would Raise. Think I would Raise about 10 (4.10+2.05+2x2.05)

      If he pushes: Here we have my main problem again!!! I have a hard time in these situations. On the one hand it seems like a very strong hand villain have if he goes All In. On the other hand I think Im committed and have a few outs to a House.
      Think I would call....?


      Looking forward to hear from you.

      Kasper
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good Job! Homework #6 Done!

      Glad you are doing that great, follow the BRM. ;)

      About Question #3:
      Two lines can quickly be discarded here: fold and raise/fold; your hand is simply too strong for those alternatives.

      It's hard to assess whether you should put in a raise here. When a rather passive player decides to bet into three players while being out of position, it does look strong. It's more likely an indication of a made hand than that of a draw.

      A raise naturally protects, but you run the risk of isolating yourself against very strong range. Which weaker hands could your opponent possibly continue playing here?

      The deciding factor finally comes in the size of the pot. This tiny pot simply isn't worth putting yourself into a tough spot where you could potentially end up risking your entire stack. A raise would be overplayed here and pot control takes the precedent over protection.

      Best of Luck on the tables and with the Course. Some more points earned.
    • StraGus
      StraGus
      Bronze
      Joined: 23.03.2009 Posts: 123
      Hi Veriz.

      I am not able to read the hole articles in lesson 7 as im not a silver member anymore.
      (Have been silver in the past but have been moved down again for some reason.)

      Is there anything to do? Thought I maybe could read them when I was in the course.

      My plan was to start playing tracked again when I have finished the course and hopefully passed the exam.

      Kasper
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Originally posted by StraGus
      Hi Veriz.

      I am not able to read the hole articles in lesson 7 as im not a silver member anymore.
      (Have been silver in the past but have been moved down again for some reason.)

      Is there anything to do? Thought I maybe could read them when I was in the course.

      My plan was to start playing tracked again when I have finished the course and hopefully passed the exam.

      Kasper
      Well, unfortunately I doubt that. :( It's not really much to do. The few points for silver shouldn't be that hard to get. :> Every day you play you already get +10 points. Also now good promotions running, if you go Gold get $20 or whatsoever there was running.
    • StraGus
      StraGus
      Bronze
      Joined: 23.03.2009 Posts: 123
      Hello Veriz.

      I just want to say thank you very much for all your hand evaluations. It is a great help!

      I think I am beginning to understand why it is so important:-)

      I am collecting points at the moment in order to be able to read the articles for lesson 7.
      You will reciewe my homework as soon as I am Silver:-)

      Kasper
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      You are welcome! Hopefully we will be able to fix even more leaks in your game. :) Silver shouldn't be that hard to get with the extra 10 points you get for playing 1point per day.
    • StraGus
      StraGus
      Bronze
      Joined: 23.03.2009 Posts: 123
      Hello again.
      Now I have become Silver and I can proceed with the school:-)
      Here is my homework for lesson 7:

      Question 1: Post a hand for evaluation where you have played on a 6-max table (short-handed).

      NL 2 SH Stab


      Question 2: Evaluate one of the hands submitted by other members


      NL2 FR - 444v555


      Question 3: Consider the following situation:

      PF: Nice multiway pot to enter with SC.
      FLOP: I would also bet out with my monster draw. When raised All In and there is another caller before us I think it is close. But I think I would call. CO could have Top Pair or a Overpair while Bu could have some kind of draw. In this case I think we are doing okay.


      Question 4: Consider the following situation:

      Here I would just call. A fold is too weak and I dont think a raise is nessecary. The bord is very dry so we dont need to Raise for protection. Furthermore we have position and can reevaluate after his ction on turn


      Looking forward to your comments.

      Kasper
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