pushing ranges in 45man SnGs

    • Castle93
      Castle93
      Bronze
      Joined: 06.06.2011 Posts: 1,452
      so basically the stack i find hardest to play in these when it gets to like 10-15 players is an average stack (maybe abit less) where i have between 5-8BB, i often go out like just off the money but often pushing wider means i take down the torny.


      Can anyone help me with what i should/ shouldnt be pushing, as its turbos blind and antes cripple your stack so bad but i cant seem to get the right balence between keeping my stack up and playing tight enough to make the money.


      Short stack is easy enough to play, shove into the right BB and hope for the best, big stack yu can bully so much but its this average stack i cant seem to play it
  • 2 replies
    • blax41
      blax41
      Bronze
      Joined: 12.12.2009 Posts: 52
      Dont be afraid to go under 5BB. The right hand will come and be happy if you put your chips in front and someone suckouts on you becouse you will win in long term if you follow proper BRM
    • losched16
      losched16
      Basic
      Joined: 26.10.2011 Posts: 3
      A main consideration when playing MT SNGs, especially 45mans+, is that to consistently be profitable, you need to be finishing in the top 3 vs just making the money, due to the steeper payout structure. With that said, you need to be chipping up and not trying to just make the money, only to go out in 6th or 7th because you have <5bb at that point.

      Typically, the danger zone is 5BB or less because effectively, you have lost your fold equity. Therfore, you want to do your best to pick up blinds before this point occurs. Many times, if you have <5BB and the blinds are about to hit you, you will have to make a -EV shove just to conserve any fold equity that you have left.

      Of course there are other factors involved (such as villain stack sizes and calling ranges), but let's say you have <10BB on the button, this could be an any two card shove to steal those blinds. You cannot just wait around for "good" hands to play because it could be too late. So those times that you are not picking up easy hands to shove, you need to stay afloat for when the blinds come through next, and typically that is done by shoving wide in late position to maximize your fold equity.

      These are very broad statements, but programs like SNG Wiz and Nash Calculators can help you with shoving ranges. (Note that SNG Wiz will base calculations on cEV vs $EV when you are pre-final table).

      Hope this helps.

      Clint