every hand revealed

    • xsniperx
      xsniperx
      Bronze
      Joined: 01.02.2008 Posts: 3
      read it!
      noone has ever done such a book before and it's great that finally someone did it. with gus' commentary on his decisions he gives a great insight on his thoughts and he is revealing really every hand he has played in the aussie millions 2007 including also those he should not have played.;-) you're playing a tournament in the head of a pro - AWESOME
      give it a go, you will "profit" in your next tournement by asking yourself in a decisionmaking situation "what would gus do in this situation" ;)
  • 8 replies
    • Philipvw
      Philipvw
      Bronze
      Joined: 28.05.2007 Posts: 578
      I ordered it 2 weeks ago and look forward to the arrival. I have only heard positive comments about the book.
    • Philipvw
      Philipvw
      Bronze
      Joined: 28.05.2007 Posts: 578
      Read it. Great! It's not a traditional poker book, it's a hand by hand diary of Gus' Aussie Millions. Gives you a fantastic insigth to aggressive play, constantly looking for spots to steal the pot pre and post flop, and it pays attention to the risk-reward ratio. Harrington may teach you some basics about hand strength in mtts, Gus will show you how to be aggressive is a succesful way. Often openraising from CO or BU with anything, attacking late openraises when in the blinds, almost constantly defending his blind, continuation betting and leading into the pf raiser on the flop. (During the tournament (before being 3handed) he played 31% of the hand he was dealt.) Explaining detailed his actions and also his mistakes.

      Fluently written and with some humour.
    • Philipvw
      Philipvw
      Bronze
      Joined: 28.05.2007 Posts: 578
      I [Gobboboy] will say this without having finished it (I read my part first obv), if he actually plays like this (and there's a decent chance he's lying about it to get further action) then he's ridiculously exploitable playing against good players. The most exploitable I have ever seen.

      If I knew what I know now it would've been a very different experience playing with him. He is the loosest player I've ever seen out of position.
    • chenny8888
      chenny8888
      Bronze
      Joined: 03.10.2007 Posts: 19,324
      it's possible gus is bluffing with this book.

      btw i very much respect gobboboy's opinion when it comes to MTT
    • Philipvw
      Philipvw
      Bronze
      Joined: 28.05.2007 Posts: 578
      I also found a comment of Lee Nelson about his hand mentioned in the book:

      First of all, let me say that I enjoyed reading Gus' book "Every Hand Revealed." Any time you can get a hand-by-hand annotated account from an established tournament pro, it's worth the price of admission. This book isn't so much a teaching manual as it is a great insight into how a tournament is won and how play differs in the various stages of a major event. I recommend reading this book no matter what level of player you are if for no other reason than to help you develop defenses against loose aggressive players such as Gus, Antonius, Ivey, and others of their ilk.

      On page 128 (Hand 133) Gus discusses the hand that knocked me out of the tournament in 30th place. I had won the prior year. This analysis was apparently widely disseminated by Full Tilt as a marketing tool for the book. In his review, Gus has reservations about the way I played that hand and thinks I played it the way I did because of his reputation. This is clearly not the case and I'll take you through the hand and explain my actions since this hand has been the subject of a lot of scrutiny and conjecture.

      Although a hand-by-hand analysis makes Gus's insights clear, it obviously can only guess at what might be going through an opponent's mind with only partial information.

      Here's my recollection and analysis:

      I had just been recently moved to Gus's table and had about 350,000 with blinds and antes of 4k/8k/1k at an 8-handed table for a CSI (M) of 17.5. AsGus correctly reported, I raised from middle position to 24k holding Kc-9c. All folded to Gus who called from the small blind and the BB folded. The flop was Qh Qc 4c. Gus checked.

      Gus reported that I then bet 44,000 and he raised to 100k. My recollection is a bit different: I bet 25k into the 64k pot and Gus made it 75k. A continuation bet was clealy in order, and the flush draw was a bonus. My bet size was guaged to have sufficient fire power in reserve for later in the hand.

      Although Gus describes his raise (44k to 100k) as a mini-raise, I believe it was actually a more standard raise of 3x my bet (25k to 75k), even though my bet was only about 40% of the pot. Additionally, Gus had a clearly visible tremor when he made this raise. As a doctor in my life before poker, there was no doubt in my mind that this small but visible shake was real. What to think?

      I had never played with Gus prior to this, but have studied him on DVDs and I had never noticed this tremor before. I had seen him win some huge hands, such as with quads versus Negreanu's full house to take down a huge cash pot, but no tremor. Yet I had just observed one. Either it meant weakness or a big hand. I decided that it more likely represented weakness than strength, a judgment that was soon to be proved incorrect.

      Faced with a 50,000 raise with a pot size now of 164,000 including Gus's raise and 300k left in front of me before acting, I had to decide how to proceed. I put Gus on a range of pairs from 44-JJ, Ax of clubs or a lower flush draw, a Q, or a small chance of an airball. Folding was definitely not an option. I considered Gus's recommended play of calling. The problems I had with this were:

      1) Based on my read of Gus' tremor, I thought probably had a modest holding.

      2) If I called the pot size would be 214k and I would have 250k left. If a club didn't come on the turn, I had a hard time imagining that Gus would check the turn, after check-raising the flop and I'd have to fold- one shot at a club. The only way to win the hand was either hit the flush, or hope for what I viewed as an unlikely chance that Gus would give me a free card on the turn.

      What if I push?

      Mathwise, Gus is only about 8% to have a Q. OK, his C/R raises this percentage substantially but is certainly far from dispository, especially given my read.

      Gus has to fold all pairs 55-JJ and probably AA and KK as well.

      If Gus has the nut flush draw, he's getting the wrong price to call as he has to put me on a Q if I push. Getting about 1.85/1 and being a likely 3/1 dog makes for an easy fold. The only hands he can call with are either 44 or a hand containing at least one Q. Even if he slow-played AA or KK pre-flop, this is a tough call. He's unlikely to call for most of his chips when those chips are so valuable as weapons with which to steal.

      If all else fails and I'm dead wrong on my read and he actually does have a Q, I still have outs and am about 25% to win. This fact combined with what I viewed as substantial fold equity given my estimation of Gus's range and my read, made pushing a positive EV play. I pushed.

      Having said all this, I have the utmost respect for Gus as a tournament player and think his book is excellent. I think it would have been even better if Gus could have described opponent's stack sizes more and put opponents on ranges more frequently, but hey, he was preparing this while winning the Aussie Millions. Now that's quite a parlay!

      Regards,

      Lee Nelson
    • chenny8888
      chenny8888
      Bronze
      Joined: 03.10.2007 Posts: 19,324
      wow, nice analysis by Lee Nelson.

      by the way, what was gus' hand?
    • Philipvw
      Philipvw
      Bronze
      Joined: 28.05.2007 Posts: 578
      He had a queen, I think it was AQ. In the book he commented that Nelson shouldn't have lost his stack in that spot and probably based his play on the perceived 'crazy' image of Gus.

      EDIT: It was AQ.
    • Kivisaba
      Kivisaba
      Bronze
      Joined: 25.02.2008 Posts: 112
      lol tremor :D