My Tilting Analysis - Good or Bad?

    • maythany
      maythany
      Bronze
      Joined: 18.10.2011 Posts: 1,189
      Hello,

      Yesterday was a pretty bad day for me. I lost $42.00 CAD (ish), but I was able to get back a little bit (around $16.00). Which is 12 buy-ins at the $3.50-18 man tournaments. That means I lost 12 times... straight.

      Now I do not entirely blame the other players for calling extremely loose against my premium hands and most of the time....rags. I understand that everyone plays differently and to expect everyone to play like how I want them to is unrealistic and well.. selfish.

      I made a lot of mistakes yesterday. I did a lot of moves I normally wouldn't like 3-bet all in with Ace rag or chase really bad draws like a gut-shot straight draw. I remember it very clearly how I went all-in with a gut-shot straight draw after a bet was made on the flop and a re-raise after that.

      I was able to reflect back on my actions at work today and I was able to make a list compiling of my mistakes that I made and how I can improve on these specific areas.


      1. Too Tired

      You ever have those days where you didn't sleep enough and you were in that state of mind where you reacted slowly and couldn't think at all? That was me yesterday.

      Improvement: Sleep More

      2. Play Too Many Hands

      I have a V$pip of 27%

      I definitely plan on decreasing that and stop defending my blinds with weak hands like 10-7 off suit and J-2. Yes I really did call a minimum raise from an early blind raiser with J-2 suited.

      Improvement: Stop blind defending with rags and playing too many mediocre hands.

      3. Pushing with Mediocre Hands

      I pushed with KJ off with 10+BB when I was playing yesterday against a 3x BB raise from EP to MP raiser.

      Improvement: Call to see what develops on the flop or fold to a 3x raise.

      4. Recognize I am Tilting

      I have to realise that I am actually tilting because my AK didn't hit against 22 and not blaming it on downswings.

      Improvement: Take a small break every now and then to accept the losses and move on.

      5. Leaving My Ego Away From The Tables

      I hate losing, and who doesn't? I am unable to accept losing days, therefore I would stay as late as 3 A.M. knowing very well I work in 4 hours and I am too tired to even play poker.

      Improvement: Accept losing days and see it as a way to improve to become a better player.


      I feel these are the top 5 most important factors I need to improve on. I don't plan on playing at all today because I am still a little emotional about my decisions yesterday. I am going to review my plays and watch some videos about SNG on a site I registered with.

      If you have any tips or suggestions, please I encourage you to post a reply. All is welcome and greatly appreciated!

      Thanks!

      Maythany B
  • 5 replies
    • Hopey
      Hopey
      Bronze
      Joined: 05.03.2010 Posts: 193
      4. Recognize I am Tilting I have to realise that I am actually tilting because my AK didn't hit against 22 and not blaming it on downswings.

      Improvement: Take a small break every now and then to accept the losses and move on.

      5. Leaving My Ego Away From The Tables I hate losing, and who doesn't? I am unable to accept losing days, therefore I would stay as late as 3 A.M. knowing very well I work in 4 hours and I am too tired to even play poker.

      Improvement: Accept losing days and see it as a way to improve to become a better player.


      These are the big two in my opinion. The difficulty is actually doing something about it.

      A good technique I have found in combating tilt is to laugh. In situations of high stress or trauma its suprising how often humans turn towards humour, it is natural.

      If you make it funny for yourself that you just shoved KJ into a 3bet pot then you achieve two things. 1. You eliminate some of the stress from the situation, laughing relaxes you. 2. By noticing what you've done and finding it funny you acknowledge that it was a mistake and noticing mistakes is the first step in eliminating them.
    • altruist
      altruist
      Bronze
      Joined: 29.05.2007 Posts: 121


      A good technique I have found in combating tilt is to laugh. In situations of high stress or trauma its surprising how often humans turn towards humour, it is natural.

      If you make it funny for yourself that you just shoved KJ into a 3bet pot then you achieve two things. 1. You eliminate some of the stress from the situation, laughing relaxes you. 2. By noticing what you've done and finding it funny you acknowledge that it was a mistake and noticing mistakes is the first step in eliminating them.
      Hey I like that, that sounds really good.

      I just reached gold today, could use that with all the hands I'm playing.
    • ArkhamAsylum
      ArkhamAsylum
      Bronze
      Joined: 06.09.2011 Posts: 527
      well done on gold, and actually taking time to write that out op is a nice first step.
    • bazfresh
      bazfresh
      Bronze
      Joined: 11.08.2010 Posts: 64
      [quote]Originally posted by Hopey
      4. Recognize I am Tilting I have to realise that I am actually tilting because my AK didn't hit against 22 and not blaming it on downswings.

      Improvement: Take a small break every now and then to accept the losses and move on.

      5. Leaving My Ego Away From The Tables I hate losing, and who doesn't? I am unable to accept losing days, therefore I would stay as late as 3 A.M. knowing very well I work in 4 hours and I am too tired to even play poker.

      Improvement: Accept losing days and see it as a way to improve to become a better player.


      These sound like The Poker Mindset always worth a read in situations like this...

      1. Understand and Accept the Realities of Poker
      2. Play for the Long Term
      3. Emphasize Correct Decisions over Making Money
      4. Desensitize Yourself to Money
      5. Leave Your Ego at the Door
      6. Remove All Emotion from Decisions
      7. Dedicate Yourself to a Continuous Cycle of Analysis and Improvement
    • pokedher
      pokedher
      Bronze
      Joined: 26.05.2010 Posts: 13
      [quote]Originally posted by bazfresh
      Originally posted by Hopey
      4. Recognize I am Tilting I have to realise that I am actually tilting because my AK didn't hit against 22 and not blaming it on downswings.

      Improvement: Take a small break every now and then to accept the losses and move on.

      5. Leaving My Ego Away From The Tables I hate losing, and who doesn't? I am unable to accept losing days, therefore I would stay as late as 3 A.M. knowing very well I work in 4 hours and I am too tired to even play poker.

      Improvement: Accept losing days and see it as a way to improve to become a better player.


      These sound like The Poker Mindset always worth a read in situations like this...

      1. Understand and Accept the Realities of Poker
      2. Play for the Long Term
      3. Emphasize Correct Decisions over Making Money
      4. Desensitize Yourself to Money
      5. Leave Your Ego at the Door
      6. Remove All Emotion from Decisions
      7. Dedicate Yourself to a Continuous Cycle of Analysis and Improvement
      Nice one baz. I trade forex a bit and The Poker Mindset rules would apply very well in that context, noted.

      OP your self analysis seems spot on.

      They always say identifying the problem is the hardest part but I only half agree. I am fairly aware of my leaks and personality faults as they apply to the tables but some element of self destruction (tilt) often appears at the end of a long session.

      Acting with consistent discipline over long periods is real hard if it's not part of your psychological makeup and is an area where improved poker skills can actually overlap into improved life skills. Good luck