Jomi318

    • Jomi318
      Jomi318
      Bronze
      Joined: 03.05.2012 Posts: 13
      Question 1: What is your motivation for playing poker?
      Well, basicaly I just can't see myself working on an office or for somebody else for the rest of my life.
      I'm on college now, 21 years old, on my way to finish computer science graduation and after that I'd like to do something different for a living ... like playing poker!, but still be able to say that "hey, look I'm playing poker for a living because I want to, not because I can't get a job. Here's my college degree" :P
      Like it's mentioned on one of your articles I'd get to be my own manager, I'd choose my own working shedule and win decent money.

      What are your weaknesses when playing poker?
      I've been playing here and now, all sorts of variety of poker games but never realy took the time to study it. I'd say I'm no fish but nothing special of a player.
      I've been reading some of the articles here and I'd say I've been making some mistakes post flop, especially not putting my opponents on a range of hands and not bluffing appropriately.

      What does it mean to play tight aggressive?
      As far as I got it, basicaly means that you choose your preflop hands carefully according to your position and your opponents actions and then play them agressively, either for value, protection or as a bluff (or semi-Bluff) depending on the community cards.
      It works because if you play tight you avoid difficult decisions later on (thus saving money), and by playing agressive you put your opponents on difficult decisions, gaining money from their mistakes.

      ps: I'm from Portugal so sorry for any possible grammar mistakes. Most part of my English comes from TV/Games... I think It's pretty decent though :]
  • 8 replies
    • Tomaloc
      Tomaloc
      Bronze
      Joined: 17.01.2011 Posts: 6,858
      Originally posted by Jomi318
      ps: I'm from Portugal so sorry for any possible grammar mistakes. Most part of my English comes from TV/Games... I think It's pretty decent though :]
      we wouldn't ever have noticed :f_biggrin:

      i have also learned all my english from games and the internet. definitely the most efficient language school available :f_biggrin:
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Welcome to the Course and Best of Luck. Good job! Homework #1 Done!

      Don't worry about your English, can learn both. :D Same goes for me, learn most part from the internet.

      Most of the weakness you wrote can easily be fixed by posting hands (analyzing your session). We will start writing feedback to your play. Usually negative feedback will put you into thinking phase and trying to fix all those leaks. It's almost the same as you lose money, you will remember it more than winning part. By this situation it's gonna be that negative feedback you gonna remember and try to avoid them next time.

      Seems like you already started with something, hopefully you will proceed and be successful with. Learning and improving your game in poker is very important and I'd try to stick to one variant of poker and try to learn it.

      What about tilt? Do you adjust something against it? For example:
      Easiest way to fight against tilt is to set up stop-loss technique. Which means if you for example have lost more than 3BIs for a session then you just stop the session for some time. The BI amount is set up from your own results. Some may put it higher, some lower. Also after the stop you can spend some time with evaluation part to become better.

      Tight style is usually called playing selected hands. Like following the Starting Hand Chart. Aggressive should be also pretty clear that already the word says how you should be playing. But the problem playing aggressively is that you have to watch that you don't play too aggressive. Find good spots, find good targets. About The tight-aggressive strategy you can read in this article: "What is the Big Stack Strategy?"

      Hopefully you will enjoy the Course.
    • Jomi318
      Jomi318
      Bronze
      Joined: 03.05.2012 Posts: 13
      Thanks! I'll be posting the next homework after finishing college exam season.

      ( )
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Originally posted by Jomi318
      Thanks! I'll be posting the next homework after finishing college exam season.

      ( )
      No problem mate, I had also my master thesis on which I worked so my answer had a delay. :) How did it go in the exam season?
    • Jomi318
      Jomi318
      Bronze
      Joined: 03.05.2012 Posts: 13
      Originally posted by veriz
      Originally posted by Jomi318
      Thanks! I'll be posting the next homework after finishing college exam season.


      ( )
      No problem mate, I had also my master thesis on which I worked so my answer had a delay. :) How did it go in the exam season?
      Great. Thanks :D

      Here's Homework 2:

      Question 1: What do you think you could play differently than suggested in the BSS Starting Hands Chart and why?
      Like suggested in the "Crushing NL50" article there are certain situations in which you can expand the BSS Starting Hands Chart:
      - Blind Stealing: If you think that if you raise (late position), most of the times the blinds will give up the pot right away or fold after a continuation bet on the flop you can expand your range by suited conectors and one-gappers, as well as offsuit connectors or offsuit ace-high hands, and suited king-high hands.
      - Isolation: Considering the number and position of limpers, and having in account their stack size, it is profitable to raise after a limper (or call depending on the goal) with a wider range than suggested by the SHC, because when an opponent limps you can often put him in a certain range of hands, acording to your own SHC.

      Question 2: Do you have questions about your preflop play? Post your hand for evaluation.
      Nothing comes to mind right now. Apart from what has already been covered in the previous question.

      Question 3: What is the equity of AKo against the top 5% range? 5% means 88+, AJs+, KQs, AKo.
      Assuming we're heads up, Pokerstrategy.com Equilab gives us a 46.32% equity.

      :s_cool:
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good job! Homework #2 Done!

      Totally agree with you about the stealing ranges. Against specific opponents we adjust, either wider range or tighter range. Against some shorties you can even steal with smaller raise, for example 3xBB. But don't overdo the stealing situations. Sometimes you might just put yourself into too many difficult spots if opening with marginal hands. As for example stealing too many hands from SB and being out of position.

      Isolating can be very profitable actually since people on lower stakes take the fast and easy line by just Fit/Folding too much. With that you will earn in long run a lot profit. Which means you can isolate with even wider range, sometimes even with the all range which you planned to limp.

      About Question #3:

             Equity     Win     Tie
      UTG    46.32%  37.92%   8.41% { AKo }
      UTG+1  53.68%  45.27%   8.41% { 88+, AJs+, KQs, AKo }

      Hopefully you enjoy the Course so far.
    • Jomi318
      Jomi318
      Bronze
      Joined: 03.05.2012 Posts: 13
      Here's Homework 3:

      Question 0: Download and install the Equilab.

      Done :P

      Question 1: You are holding K :spade: Q :spade: . What is your preflop equity against an opponent who has 3 :diamond: 3 :club: ? How does the equity change on this flop: J :spade: 5 :diamond: 3 :spade: ?
      Preflop:

             Equity     Win     Tie
      UTG    50.78%  50.40%   0.38% { KsQs }
      UTG+1  49.22%  48.84%   0.38% { 3d3c }




      Board: 5:diamond: J:spade: 3:spade:
             Equity     Win     Tie
      UTG    26.46%  26.46%   0.00% { KsQs }
      UTG+1  73.54%  73.54%   0.00% { 3d3c }


      Question 2: What would you do in the following hand?
      No Limit hold'em $2 (9-handed)
      Players and stacks:
      UTG: $2.00
      UTG+1: $2.08
      MP1: $1.92
      MP2: $1.00
      MP3: $3.06
      CO: (Hero) $2.08
      BU: $2.00
      SB: $2.00
      BB: $1.24
      Preflop: Hero is CO with A :club: J :club:
      5 folds, Hero raises to $0.08, BU calls $0.08, SB folds, BB calls $0.06.
      Flop: ($0.25) 2 :club: 6 :diamond: 3 :diamond: (3 players)
      BB checks, Hero checks, BU checks.
      Turn: ($0.25) 5 :club: (3 players)
      BB checks, Hero bets $0.22, BU raises to $0.44, BB folds, Hero...?

      On this case the Hero is drawing for a flush or an Ace or Jack to hit the turn. On the turn the BU shows some strength by raising possibly indicating that he has a 4, thus completing the straight so Hero can no longer consider his overcards draw.
      However he still can consider the flushdraW giving him 4:1 odds of hitting a club on the river. With $0.91 on the pot and $0.22 for him to call, it gives him aprox. 4.1:1 pot odds so it is profitable for him to call.
      Action: Hero Calls.

      Question 3: Do you have questions about your postflop play? Post your hand for evaluation.
      Nothing comes to mind. Your articles really bring logic to my actions both preflop and postflop, so I've been playing with more confidence.

      Cheers ( )
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good job! Homework #3 Done!

      About Question #1:
      Preflop Equity:

      Equity Win Tie
      UTG 50.78% 50.40% 0.38% { KsQs }
      UTG+1 49.22% 48.84% 0.38% { 3d3c }


      Postflop Equity:

      Board: J:spade: 5:diamond: 3:spade:
      Equity Win Tie
      UTG 26.46% 26.46% 0.00% { KsQs }
      UTG+1 73.54% 73.54% 0.00% { 3d3c }


      About Question #2:
      There are several occasions on turn:
      a) If we take just odds for the FD and we take into account that all our odds are clean. Which means:
      Total Pot = $0,91 ; We have to Call = $0,22 -> According to that it means we are getting ~4,16:1 odds. For flushdraw we would need 4:1. Which tells us that we are getting perfect odds.
      b) If we consider the opponent having sets here:
      Which means we have to discount outs, for example 6 and also 3. Which means we have 7 clean outs so that means we need 6:1 odds. That tells us that we need ~$0,41 on river to make it profitable. If we expect the opponent being loose enough and being able to pay us no-matter what then we can do the Call here properly.
      c) We might even have overcards as outs or even 4 as a out:
      Although this kind of situation ain't that likely. I'd rather discount that one and either pick a) or b). Most likely towards Call.

      You are doing great progress, keep going!