William340

    • William340
      William340
      Bronze
      Joined: 10.02.2012 Posts: 170
      hello!
      I've been attending the beginner's coachings w/ Veriz for a few weeks now, but never started my thread.

      I am a "recreational" player looking to improve. I've already learned quite a bit from the coachings and the hand evaluations.

      now I have a place to post homework, etc.

      this also motivated me to (finally) start my blog.
  • 10 replies
    • William340
      William340
      Bronze
      Joined: 10.02.2012 Posts: 170
      so, on to the first homework:
      Question 1: What is your motivation for playing poker?
      Well, I guess I would have to say "to make money", but realistically, it's more for entertainment or as an intellectual exercise. The chances of me making an "real" money are pretty small at this point.

      Question 2: What are your weaknesses when playing poker?
      I am not good at reading hands, and I end up in difficult spots.
      So I feel like I pay off sets too often when I have strong top pair or (more often) overpairs to the board. But I am also afraid that if I am willing to lay down KK to a lot of flop action on a J72r board, I will end up seeing the villain had QQ or AJ.
      I have problems w/ betsizing that I am working on, and my 3B percentage is ridiculously low. (1.4% !!)

      Question 3: What does it mean to play tight aggressive?
      TAG's play a relatively small percentage of hands (say 18% or less vpip in a FR game) but they tend to play them strongly (pfr is 75% or greater of the vpip, so say 18/15 or 16/12).
      They would be positionally aware, so they might only be 8/8 in EP and 33/27 on the BTN, with the numbers for the seats in between rising steadily.
      They likely have 3B and squeeze numbers around 5 or 6%.
      Postflop they are much more likely to be betting & raising instead of checking & calling, and they will check-raise.
      Their aggression is selective. They will push their big hands hard, and they will exploit signs of weakness. They generally will not put a lot of money in the pot when they are weak just to be "aggressive".
      Their aggression, backed with their hand selection makes them hard to play against.
    • Tomaloc
      Tomaloc
      Bronze
      Joined: 17.01.2011 Posts: 6,858
      Originally posted by William340
      I am a "recreational" player looking to improve
      ZOMG fish! :f_eek:

      that fits me well too actually. i guess it could be said that we are serious fish :f_biggrin:
    • William340
      William340
      Bronze
      Joined: 10.02.2012 Posts: 170
      Originally posted by Tomaloc
      Originally posted by William340
      I am a "recreational" player looking to improve
      ZOMG fish! :f_eek:

      that fits me well too actually. i guess it could be said that we are serious fish :f_biggrin:
      interestingly (or not!) a full 25% of my winnings have come from a mutitabling regular who (according to PTR) has played 373k total hands since March and 231k hands at 4NL since March on Merge.
      his "winrate" is -0.09 bb/100 over all limits, and about +2bb/100 at 4NL.

      I still do some fishy stuff.
      but I am doing ok over all.
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Welcome to the Course and Best of Luck. Good job! Homework #1 Done!

      Most of the weakness you wrote can easily be fixed by posting hands (analyzing your session). We will start writing feedback to your play. Usually negative feedback will put you into thinking phase and trying to fix all those leaks. It's almost the same as you lose money, you will remember it more than winning part. By this situation it's gonna be that negative feedback you gonna remember and try to avoid them next time.

      What about tilt? Do you adjust something against it? For example:
      Easiest way to fight against tilt is to set up stop-loss technique. Which means if you for example have lost more than 3BIs for a session then you just stop the session for some time. The BI amount is set up from your own results. Some may put it higher, some lower. Also after the stop you can spend some time with evaluation part to become better.

      About hand reading don't worry, cause it's coming with experience and time. You can't really start to do the same things which does a good player do who has been playing for longer time. It takes time and a time investment into poker and improving by learning new things.

      Tight style is usually called playing selected hands. Like following the Starting Hand Chart. Aggressive should be also pretty clear that already the word says how you should be playing. But the problem playing aggressively is that you have to watch that you don't play too aggressive. Find good spots, find good targets. About The tight-aggressive strategy you can read in this article: "What is the Big Stack Strategy?"

      Hopefully you will enjoy the Course.
    • William340
      William340
      Bronze
      Joined: 10.02.2012 Posts: 170
      Question 1: What do you think you could play differently than suggested in the BSS Starting Hands Chart and why? (Are there any hands you would play differently? Do you have a problem or question about how a specific hand or hands should be played?)

      The starting hand chart does not address multiple limpers or stack sizes (other than Call 20).
      It also does not address any stats you might have on your opponents.
      So, while I do play fairly close to the Chart, I do "open up" a little if the preflop raiser is loose (and open raises a lot of hands) and the players who will act after me do not 3B or squeeze much.

      The starting hand chart is quite solid, and will likely help beginning players avoid disaster, but that makes it overyly restrictive in certain games /situations.

      Also, I think it is necessary to mix it up some if you are playing against observant opponents so they cannot be sure what your open raises mean.

      Question 2: Do you have questions about your preflop play? Post your hand for evaluation. ( Post your hand in the Hand evaluation forums and provide a link to your hand in your private thread in the Locker Room.)

      I have posted some pre-flop hands in the evaluation forum, and I will post more when I find "interesting" (or confusing to me!) spots.
      right now, I am looking to work on my 3 betting, as I currently 3B so narrowly.
      looking at the 71 (!!!) times I have 3B, it looks like
      AA - 19 times
      KK - 21 times
      QQ - 10 times
      AK - 13 times
      JJ - 5 times
      TT - 2 times
      KJs - 1 time (from SB vs CO raise. CO effectively 4B shoved, I folded)

      on the bright side, my 3 betting has been profitable. (no kidding, right?)
      but I pretty much only 3B for value, and with an extremely narrow range.

      the bad part is, 41 of the 71 times, my 3B was called and in those hands, I am a net loser of $2.10! but, let's stick to pre-flop.

      I am even worse at squeezing.
      7 hands total!
      JJ 1 time
      QQ 2 times
      KK 1 time
      AA 2 times
      AKs 1 time.

      overall, it's been a disaster. -$5.93 (at 4NL!)
      in 5 of the 7 hands I was in the BB.
      two of those I played poorly postflop.

      I think in general, I might be better off overcalling, and letting the pfr keep the iniative.

      I had 99 hands where I just overcalled. -$4.78
      and it looks like the biggest problem was overcalling from the blinds w/ speculative hands.
      -2.83 from the SB, -3.50 from the BB.


      Question 3: What is the equity of AKo against the top 5% range? 5% means 88+, AJs+, KQs, AKo. ( You can either calculate this yourself or use an equity calculator such as the PokerStrategy.com Equilab.)
      ~ 46.3%
    • William340
      William340
      Bronze
      Joined: 10.02.2012 Posts: 170
      Originally posted by veriz

      What about tilt? Do you adjust something against it? For example:
      Easiest way to fight against tilt is to set up stop-loss technique. Which means if you for example have lost more than 3BIs for a session then you just stop the session for some time. The BI amount is set up from your own results. Some may put it higher, some lower. Also after the stop you can spend some time with evaluation part to become better.
      I have not had too much trouble w/ tilt so far, because I have been mostly successful.
      I know the sample size is very small, but right now I have 35 winning days (sessions) and 9 losing days (sessions).

      my worst session so far (by a wide margin!) was -$12.76
      the two biggest losing hands were kind bad beats / suckouts.
      JJ vs TT; AI on turn as 82% favorite on 698J board, river 7.
      AA vs AKs; AI on flop as 62% favorite on 745 two-tone board, turn made flush.

      the next biggest was
      KdQd vs QcTc, flop came 4cKcKh. he made flush on turn & check/called turn & river!

      I was frustrated during the session, as I thought I was not playing badly, but just could not win.

      none of my other losing sessions are over 2 BI.

      as I have said before, in general, the players are even worse than me, so it's not too hard to win.

      a few of the good, aggressive players make me feel tilty when they have position on me and either 3B me or call, then abuse me post flop.
      who knows, maybe they even have me beat when they do it.
      If I get to feeling that they are preventing me from getting anywhere, I just leave the table & find a new one.

      I confess that sometimes I get the "Hellmuth tilt" where I begin to think "you just wait unitl I have a monster & you pull that crap!".
      but that is fairly safe, because while I am waiting (and waiting and waiting) for AA or KK preflop or a flopped monster to trap them with, the feeling usually goes away.
      I realize that their aggression may catch up with them sooner or later, but it's probably going to be later, and it probably won't be me.
      SO I try to channel my thoughts more productively: how can I play more like them and abuse the weak players.
      obviously I can't do it w/ them at the table on my left!
      so I usually leave.

      Originally posted by veriz
      Hopefully you will enjoy the Course.
      I am enjoying it a lot so far!
      talking about the game always gets me thinking, and having better players (constructively) criticize my play helps me to look at spots differently.
    • William340
      William340
      Bronze
      Joined: 10.02.2012 Posts: 170
      Question 0: Download and install the Equilab.
      did this a while ago.

      Question 1: You are holding KQ. What is your preflop equity against an opponent who has 33? How does the equity change on this flop: J53?
      pre-flop equity is 48.7%
      post flop is a bit tricky, as you do not give the suits of the hole cards or the flopped cards, so I don't know if I've picked up a flush draw.
      so, I am going to do J53r
      on a rainbow flop, it's a disaster. my equity is ~3.7%
      on a monotone flop, my equity is 18% as I might have flopped a flush or picked up a draw to a flush. Villain would still have outs to a boat.
      on a two tone flop my equity is about 6% as I might have flush draw or backdoor flush draw.
      in any case, I am in deep trouble


      Question 2: What would you do in the following hand? (Remember that it is important to explain your reasons, simply posting "Fold" or "Call" isn't enough!)

      No Limit hold'em $2 (9-handed)

      Players and stacks:
      UTG: $2.00
      UTG+1: $2.08
      MP1: $1.92
      MP2: $1.00
      MP3: $3.06
      CO: (Hero) $2.08
      BU: $2.00
      SB: $2.00
      BB: $1.24

      Preflop: Hero is CO with AJ
      5 folds, Hero raises to $0.08, BU calls $0.08, SB folds, BB calls $0.06.

      Flop: ($0.25) 263 (3 players)
      BB checks, Hero checks, BU checks.

      Turn: ($0.25) 5 (3 players)
      BB checks, Hero bets $0.22, BU raises to $0.44, BB folds, Hero...?


      At first I tried to work on this in equilab and put the button on a range and compare it to my hand, this flop etc.
      but I started to get bogged down & thinking perhaps I was overcomplicating matters.
      with 100BB effective and absolute position, the Button could call preflop with
      a wide range of hands. pairs from maybe JJ - 22, A2s+, ATo+, broadway cards, suited connectors, maybe even some offsuit connectors.

      while this flop misses a big part of his range, there are a few important things to remember:
      I have A high and an inside straight draw that may not be any good
      so, all I can beat is a bluff.
      if he is not bluffing I am either drawing dead or drawing to my 6 overcard outs and maybe the four 4's.
      this is not the last round of betting. even if I pick up a pair, I would not want to call a big bet on a 4 straight board.
      while he "could" be bluffing as I showed weakness on the flop, if I call here, the pot will be $1.13 on the river and the effective stack size will be $1.48 (I think) so I could easily face a pot sized bet on the river.

      frankly, "my" turn bet was a bluff that failed
      what better hands then mine would fold? what worse hands would call? and it's time to give up, I think.



      Question 3: Do you have questions about your postflop play? Post your hand for evaluation. (Post your hand in the hand evaluation forum and provide a link to your hand in your private thread in the Locker Room.)

      posted these today:
      4NL JJ in BB - fishy BTN raises, board

      NL4 - hit ISD on T, now what?
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good job! Homework #2 Done!

      The starting hand chart does not address multiple limpers or stack sizes (other than Call 20).

      It can't address to it cause then we are talking about implied odds and how often we expect to get paid if we do hit. Also the problem is that people tend to start to overplay many type of hands as TP or whatsoever.

      If you start to understand the game yourself then you will most likely widen up your range yourself, you don't need a chart to say you that. :) Chart just avoids difficult decisions.

      It also does not address any stats you might have on your opponents.

      Also kind of hard to say cause sample size is always very important here. People just tend not to take into account sample size and just follow the stats.

      Also, I think it is necessary to mix it up some if you are playing against observant opponents so they cannot be sure what your open raises mean.

      True, but I doubt that people adjust much on your limits right now. :P

      Seems that you having trouble to get the understanding what's the idea of squeezing and overall 3betting. You are kind of tight and might in the future want to loosen up a bit if you move up the stakes. But on those stakes you don't really have to have a very loose 3betting range nor squeezing range, people don't pay attention your game anyways.

      About Question #3:

             Equity     Win     Tie
      UTG    46.32%  37.92%   8.41% { AKo }
      UTG+1  53.68%  45.27%   8.41% { 88+, AJs+, KQs, AKo }

      Hopefully you enjoy the Course so far.
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      a few of the good, aggressive players make me feel tilty when they have position on me and either 3B me or call, then abuse me post flop.

      That's a common problem but you have to get used to understand that the game isn't about winning a pot but about winning money. ;) You ain't gonna earn much profit if you start fighting back without even understanding what you doing, rather will loose money.

      With experience you will get better anyways so don't worry. :) Just keep the chin up and keep grinding and improving. Good luck!
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good job! Homework #3 Done!

      About Question #1:
      Preflop Equity:

      Equity Win Tie
      UTG 50.78% 50.40% 0.38% { KsQs }
      UTG+1 49.22% 48.84% 0.38% { 3d3c }


      Postflop Equity:

      Board: J:spade: 5:diamond: 3:spade:
      Equity Win Tie
      UTG 26.46% 26.46% 0.00% { KsQs }
      UTG+1 73.54% 73.54% 0.00% { 3d3c }


      About Question #2:
      There are several occasions on turn:
      a) If we take just odds for the FD and we take into account that all our odds are clean. Which means:
      Total Pot = $0,91 ; We have to Call = $0,22 -> According to that it means we are getting ~4,16:1 odds. For flushdraw we would need 4:1. Which tells us that we are getting perfect odds.
      b) If we consider the opponent having sets here:
      Which means we have to discount outs, for example 6 and also 3. Which means we have 7 clean outs so that means we need 6:1 odds. That tells us that we need ~$0,41 on river to make it profitable. If we expect the opponent being loose enough and being able to pay us no-matter what then we can do the Call here properly.
      c) We might even have overcards as outs or even 4 as a out:
      Although this kind of situation ain't that likely. I'd rather discount that one and either pick a) or b). Most likely towards Call.

      You are doing great progress, keep going!