Equilab - Hand strength distribution

    • JohnDoe1313
      JohnDoe1313
      Platinum
      Joined: 04.01.2011 Posts: 5,077
      Hello everybody,

      I would like to ask two questions about this awesome feature. Let's suppose a situation like this

      Board: A:diamond: 9:heart: 7:club:
             Equity     Win     Tie
      MP2    67.66%  66.88%   0.78% { 66+, AJs+, AQo+ }
      BB     32.34%  31.56%   0.78% { JhJs }


      1) In hand strength - three of a kind, top pair - what do those numbers in frequency column mean (yellow circle)? I'm thinking the first is a percentage of total range, but no idea about the second one.

      2) What does that number bottom right in black circle stand for?

      Here's a screenshot


      Thank you & have a nice day =)
  • 9 replies
    • toholdem
      toholdem
      Basic
      Joined: 27.03.2012 Posts: 19
      Definitely take this reply with a grain of salt, and confirm the answer I give with another Equilab user before banking on it. I've just started trying to learn more about how to use Equilab to show me how a Villain's range hits a particular flop and the probabilities of him making certain hands (flush, straight, set, etc). I'm still looking for more details on how to use Equilab (why I happened across this post), but after reading Harrington on Online Cash Games, I confirmed that Equilab calculates range distributions and gets the same results that he does, so I don't have to make a spreadsheet anymore (Thanks PokerStrategy.com for giving us Equilab).

      "1) In hand strength - three of a kind, top pair - what do those numbers in frequency column mean (yellow circle)? I'm thinking the first is a percentage of total range, but no idea about the second one." - the #'s on the left (13.8% / 38.5%) are the frequencies with which the shown range (66+,AJs+,AQo+) will make the hands of "three of a kind" and "top pair" respectively, against the shown flop (Ad9h7c). So, if villain starts betting all crazy at microstakes, he very well may have flopped a set, but chances are that he only has top pair and is over valuing it or wants to get you off of your hand. I still have alot of learning to do about using Equilab but that's what I understand of it so far (idk if it's correct yet). The numbers in the yellow circle, but on the right side in parenthesis - it says they are "cumulated" but I don't know exactly what they mean yet. The top pair numbers and/or the three of a kind numbers don't add up to exactly %100, so, I'm not sure what they mean (I never payed any attention to them so far).

      "2) What does that number bottom right in black circle stand for?" - That number; hmmmmmmmm... I don't know what that one means either. I'm glad I happened across this post because now I'll be keeping a lookout on that number also, to see if I can find out what it means. Hope this helps a little bit.
    • VorpalF2F
      VorpalF2F
      Super Moderator
      Super Moderator
      Joined: 02.09.2010 Posts: 8,903
      Originally posted by toholdem

      "1) In hand strength - three of a kind, top pair - what do those numbers in frequency column mean (yellow circle)? I'm thinking the first is a percentage of total range, but no idea about the second one." - the #'s on the left (13.8% / 38.5%) are the frequencies with which the shown range (66+,AJs+,AQo+) will make the hands of "three of a kind" and "top pair" respectively, against the shown flop (Ad9h7c). So, if villain starts betting all crazy at microstakes, he very well may have flopped a set, but chances are that he only has top pair and is over valuing it or wants to get you off of your hand. I still have alot of learning to do about using Equilab but that's what I understand of it so far (idk if it's correct yet). The numbers in the yellow circle, but on the right side in parenthesis - it says they are "cumulated" but I don't know exactly what they mean yet. The top pair numbers and/or the three of a kind numbers don't add up to exactly %100, so, I'm not sure what they mean (I never payed any attention to them so far).

      "2) What does that number bottom right in black circle stand for?" - That number; hmmmmmmmm... I don't know what that one means either. I'm glad I happened across this post because now I'll be keeping a lookout on that number also, to see if I can find out what it means. Hope this helps a little bit.
      Hi, toholdem
      Welcome to the forums!

      I'm glad you found Equilab -- it is indeed a great tool.
      I just opened it up to try to answer you questions, but I could not find a column labelled "frequency", nor a yellow or black circle.

      What section of Equilab are you using?
      I could not find a "hand strength distribution" function.

      Hmmm....
      Maybe my version of Equilab is outdated -- I'll check.

      Nope -- I'm using v1.2.8.0 (from Help | About)
      What version are you using, and how do you get to the place where it shows the yellow and black circles?


      Best of luck at the tables,
      --VS
    • toholdem
      toholdem
      Basic
      Joined: 27.03.2012 Posts: 19
      Hello VorpalF2F. Thanks for the welcome. In my first post (just below the OP), I quoted the OP's questions and then attempted to answer what I could of them. The yellow and black circle that he mentions - click on the "spoiler" button in his original post to get a screenshot of what he's asking about. I was looking for some tutorials on Equilab when I just happened to see his post, and
      trying to answer it helped me learn more about how to use Equilab myself, and also what questions I still had about it.

      I love it. It's a powerful program. I hate to say it, but I think PokerStove just got retired. After reading Harrington's online Cash Games book, I was going to make a spreadsheet to start calculating hand distributions and getting a sense of how certain ranges hit certain flops, but then I found that Equilab can do all of this in its "hand strength distribution" window.

      To get to the "hand strength distribution" window, you first must input a hand/range for each of at least two players. Second, enter 3 flop cards. Once "OK" is clicked after entering the 3 flop cards, a pie-looking icon will light up next to the "equity" box (it was previously greyed out), on the right side of the screen. Just click on villain's pie button (or Hero's) to see the "hand strength distribution and hand range reduction" window. It shows, on the right side, which hands are possible and how often, with the range that was entered. On the left side, is a grid, where all the specific outs that make the hands possible are either lit up or greyed out.

      After seeing this "hand strength distribution" window, click on the "spoiler" button in the original poster's post to see a screenshot of his question. I'm sort've curious as to the answers myself, although I already know what I need to calculate range distributions like Harrington does in his book.

      I'm currently looking for info on the "PFR:" and "VPIP:" sliders. I thought that I knew what they meant, but I'm confused after toying around with Equilab for a little bit (version 1.2.0.0).
    • VorpalF2F
      VorpalF2F
      Super Moderator
      Super Moderator
      Joined: 02.09.2010 Posts: 8,903
      Hi, toholdem

      Wow! Thanks for pointing that out.

      I've been using Equilab for a couple of years and never once noticed the little pie chart.

      The black circle 6.01 % is the original hand range percentage of the possibilities.

      I get this from the very top line of the Hand Strength distribution window.
      "Original hand range contains 65/1081 hands (6.01%)"

      So this situation considers 65 hands
      In the yellow circles, the first number represents the portion of those hands that gives the hand.
      For example, for 3 of a kind 9/65 == 13.8%

      The second number gives the accumulated total.
      so for one pair, top pair, the number is 25, and the first percentage is 25/65 = 38.5%

      The second percentage is the total for the two:
      13.8 + 38.5 = 52.3

      I'm not sure how I'm going to use this tool yet, but I'm sure I'll find some use for it.

      Regards,
      --VS
    • toholdem
      toholdem
      Basic
      Joined: 27.03.2012 Posts: 19
      "I'm not sure how I'm going to use this tool yet, but I'm sure I'll find some use for it."

      It took a load off of my mind when I discovered the hand distribution part of Equilab, also. I originally had read stuff on how range distributions are calclulated in a spreadsheet, and thought that I'd maybe put one together to analyse how my holecards measured against villain's perceived range after the flop hit. I had been looking for some software that did this much faster than I
      ever could hope to, when I seen a screen shot of the hand distribution window on (I think) 2+2. I'd had Equilab for about a year but hardly ever used it because I didn't know (newbie at the time) if it would only confuse me, since I was trying to get used to recalling roundabout PokerStove equities during a game.

      But after seeing that screenshot of the hand distribution window, I started up Equilab and proceeded to enter a few examples into it from Harrington's book. The numbers matched almost exactly, so I then confirmed/convinced myself that Equilab was producing the same equity numbers as PokerStove and said my farewells the older but trusty program.

      I'll probably start out using the hand distribution stuff to review hands and see how close my guesses are to what Equilab says. After time, I'm hoping it'll sink in enough that I have a pretty good sense of how my hand/range will end up connecting with a flop. I can then maybe call a few more times than usual in those spots where I'm not quite getting enough pot and implied odds (but almost enough). Plus, I'm trying to get more in tune with range-based thinking, so I'll use it to review hands on various forums and then I can post my opinions on the hand and have some actual numbers to validate my line of thought.
    • HellToupee
      HellToupee
      Basic
      Joined: 19.08.2013 Posts: 10
      Originally posted by toholdem

      I'm currently looking for info on the "PFR:" and "VPIP:" sliders. I thought that I knew what they meant, but I'm confused after toying around with Equilab for a little bit (version 1.2.0.0).
      T,

      I am by no means an expert, but this is how I understand the PFR and VPIP sliders in Equilab (assuming you understand what those two stats actually represent) :

      If the villian did not raise before the flop, I enter in the VPIP% AND the PFR% together: basically, I'm taking the entire distribution (according to VPIP) and removing the hands that we assume villian would've raised with (since he didn't raise, we could remove those hands and see whats left).

      Now, if villian made a strong raise/re-raise (given bet, position, etc) - then I will only use his PFR, and leave VPIP blank, to see only his PFR range of hands.

      Hope thats not too confusing, and again, I could be way off, but this is how I understand it...

      Jason
    • toholdem
      toholdem
      Basic
      Joined: 27.03.2012 Posts: 19
      Thanks HellToupee. That looks like a good perspective for me to start with when using both the PFR and VPIP sliders in Equilab. I don't have a database yet, so I haven't really made sure that I know exactly what "PFR" and "VPIP" stand for yet, beyond "preflop raise %" and "voluntary put $ in pot". I kind've think of them as:

      VPIP = the % of the time a player either calls or raises preflop.
      PFR = the % of the time a player raises preflop.

      So I guess basically that (vpip - pfr = the % that a player calls preflop). I read online at thepokerbank... that VPIP gives an indication of whether a player is loose/tight, whereas their VPIP and PFR looked at in relation to each other indicates whether that player is passive/aggressive. I think it was that if the PFR is %70 or more of the VPIP, then the player is most likely aggressive; and if the PFR is a low proportion of the VPIP (maybe %30 or less of the vpip) then the player is most likely passive.

      Using the above info (for ring games) to make some general guesses of an opponent's preflop play IP in an HUSnG, let's go into Equilab and see what we find. Let's say villain's preflop play from the button is: VPIP=%90, PFR=%80.

      A %90 range is: 22+, A2s+, K2s+, Q2s+, J2s+, T2s+, 92s+, 82s+, 72s+, 62s+, 52s+, 42s+, 32s, A2o+, K2o+, Q2o+, J2o+, T2o+, 93o+, 84o+, 74o+, 64o+, 53o+. 1194 combos; 158 hands.

      An %80 range is: 22+, A2s+, K2s+, Q2s+, J2s+, T2s+, 92s+, 82s+, 73s+, 62s+, 52s+, 43s, A2o+, K2o+, Q2o+, J3o+, T5o+, 95o+, 85o+, 75o+, 65o, 54o. 1062 combos; 145 hands.

      So, I guess that a villain with a preflop vpip=%90 and a pfr=%80, from the small blind, is raising his button with 145 hands and limping his button with 13 hands. I really like the fact that Equilab has two sliders (pfr and vpip) instead of only one like PokerStove. I learn quicker visually and the extra slider is a great feature. I don't think I can apply the advice from thepokerbank about the proportion of the PFR to the VPIP to this situation as it is for ring games and this is a heads up scenario. I'm getting better but still learning HU. As far as I would be willing to guess just based on these numbers for villain's preflop SB play, I'd assume that he is fairly knowledgable of HU strategy until his playing tendecies prove otherwise.

      His PFR / VPIP = about %89. I'm still not exactly sure what the typical population stats are for microstakes HUSnG's, but I'd guess that it's fairly close (give or take %10). I don't have a poker database yet and I'm not good at manually tracking player frequencies and keeping tabs over the whole population of the players that I've played, so I really am not sure of these numbers.

      I've been thinking lately of which methods I should make a habit of using to practice tracking villain's vpip and pfr manually. I'm just starting to get comfortable enough where most of my lines of play are almost second nature, so I can auto pilot some hands and concentrate more on observing villain and try to spot reads and think of exploits. Do you play HUSnG's at all and/or do you have in mind any methods that might work when trying to manually track villain's vpip and pfr? I don't yet know how most good players go about this. I was thinking of keeping two running side counts, kind of like in BlackJack/CardCounting. Or just getting a piece of scrap paper and a pen and making two columns on it, one for vpip and the other for pfr. Each column would represent a constantly updating record of something like # / #. This might be way too tedious to practically do (I've not tried it yet) but it would look something like (y=yes and n=no):
      code:
      VPIP:        PFR:
      -----        ----
      y            y
      y            y
      y            y
      y            y
      y            y
      n            n
      y            y
      y            y
      y            n
      y            y
      

      I'd probably only do this tedious procedure for villains I thought I could beat if I improved my game just a bit. After a 1-3 matches, I might end up with some useful information that would help me to figure out ways to plan a counter strategy against villain. I don't know yet but I'm definitely going to keep it in mind for later use. Either that or I'll install FreePokerDataBase if I can find a suitable site with enough HUSnG microstakes and freeroll traffic that also accepts US players and is dependable with money withdrawls within a fairly reasonable amount of time. I only have personal experience with one option but they have a questionable reputation and they don't support FPDB. I was going to try Bovada but I guess they have anonymous tables, making a database almost useless - that's why I want to try and find a good way to manually track players' frequencies. I've heard of two other poker clients but I haven't researched either of them enough yet. Or, If I happen to get the $ together I'll buy HoldEm Manager or PokerTracker.

      If you happen to have any other suggestions on how I could apply the two sliders (vpip and pfr) in Equilab
      to HUSnG's, please let me know. I've not messed with messages any on this site (pokerstrategy) to know if it even exists, but PM me if you want to and I'll trade info with you. I'm not fast enough yet to apply it to live games but I know how to use the HiLo count at BlackJack and I've just memorized the basics of counting hand combos in poker.

      When you mentioned that you enter in the vpip and pfr together if villain did not raise preflop, does that mean that you use Equilab in-game, or are you talking about when you're reviewing hand histories?
    • HellToupee
      HellToupee
      Basic
      Joined: 19.08.2013 Posts: 10
      T,

      One thing I didn't mention earlier - PFR is a subset of VPIP. VPIP = $ voluntarily put into the pot (not incl. the blinds). Obviously the more someone is voluntarily putting $ into the pot, the wider range of hands he is playing, hence your VPIP %

      To answer your last question, yes, I do have Equilab running alongside my live game, but I also use Equilab extensively when I'm reviewing (replaying) my hand histories. I usually will go back and focus on not only the hands I lost, but the hands I won, just to see if I could've extracted more value from my opponents -

      In a live game, I use a HUD that shows me any given player's VPIP, PFR, etc., so I will just plug those into Equilab to get an idea of the range of hands villian might be playing with - even if you don't go thru putting in your actual hand, the flop, etc in Equilab, it still is invaluable to simply open up the Distribution screen, enter in the villian's VPIP and/or PFR (depending on what he's doing etc) and simply leave this screen open with the hands he could be playing highlighted on the chart. Depending on his actions, and how big the hand is, I will also try to eliminate some of those hands to reduce and refine the distribution. I then save this villian into the presets (rt. side on the HD screen) under my own custom folder.

      Once you get comfortable doing this, then I would move on to using Equilab's other features little by little - so as not to get overwhelmed in a live game.
    • toholdem
      toholdem
      Basic
      Joined: 27.03.2012 Posts: 19
      "so I will just plug those into Equilab to get an idea of the range of hands villian might be playing with"

      That's a good idea. I'm going to try that when I get my batch of hand histories sent to me, to see if it helps me out when trying to first assign a range to villain's based of vpip and pfr frequencies, and also narrowing villain's range on each street to see how close I am by the end of the hand.