Database size

  • 5 replies
    • PokerTracker
      PokerTracker
      Gold
      Joined: 07.06.2011 Posts: 643
      We haven't heard that before from any of our users, and to be honest we have not looked into that. If this is true, what could this possibly mean? Could that mean that PokerTracker stores more data, and is therefore more accurate? In our opinion the database size should not be a concern for most users, with modern computers that have massive hard drives is this really a factor anymore? We almost never come across users who run out of hard drive space, its become extremely rare.
    • Phoenix2104
      Phoenix2104
      Bronze
      Joined: 16.04.2011 Posts: 183
      With SSD drives, hard drive space has become a factor again, at least until they get as cheap as the classical drives. With a 60GB SSD drive that has 15-20GB free space when a few (essential) programs are installed, an 1 million hands database that takes about 14GB of space (as I've read), is a major concern imo.
      As a matter of fact it makes the program practically unusable with 60GB SSD drives, as far as I can tell.
      Again, I don't know if this is true, I would most certainly like to know though if I can use my 6 months old computer with a 60GB SSD drive with your program, or if I would have to buy a new SSD drive in order to be able to use it.
    • PokerTracker
      PokerTracker
      Gold
      Joined: 07.06.2011 Posts: 643
      Originally posted by Phoenix2104
      With SSD drives, hard drive space has become a factor again, at least until they get as cheap as the classical drives. With a 60GB SSD drive that has 15-20GB free space when a few (essential) programs are installed, an 1 million hands database that takes about 14GB of space (as I've read), is a major concern imo.
      As a matter of fact it makes the program practically unusable with 60GB SSD drives, as far as I can tell.
      Again, I don't know if this is true, I would most certainly like to know though if I can use my 6 months old computer with a 60GB SSD drive with your program, or if I would have to buy a new SSD drive in order to be able to use it.
      Most computers that ship with just an SSD have larger drives than 60GB, should we assume that you have a physical drive as well as an SSD? We generally advise having a small SSD just for Postgres in those scenarios. As I said before, this is rarely brought up in our support forums, I am afraid we don't have enough experience to give a qualified answer at this time. Perhaps the best thing for you to do is use the PokerTracker 4 trial and then test for yourself? The trial should not interfere with your import experience.
    • aXSesPS
      aXSesPS
      Bronze
      Joined: 13.12.2010 Posts: 61
      Hi there

      There are cheper ways to create fast disks using raid option which most motherboards support.
      you can easily create a Raid0 disk made up of 2 larger normal sata disks.

      For example I use:

      a ssd for my OS
      a raid 5 array for my data and backups (3 sata 3 disks)
      a raid0 array for my hm2 databases (2 sata 2 disks)

      I Have very large databases, but do not suffer any speed issues when importing, or note creation.
      Let me know if I can help you further, I dont have experience with pokertracker, but I can help you to create inexpensive fast hdd space.

      regards
    • Phoenix2104
      Phoenix2104
      Bronze
      Joined: 16.04.2011 Posts: 183
      Originally posted by aXSesPSRNMD
      Hi there

      There are cheper ways to create fast disks using raid option which most motherboards support.
      you can easily create a Raid0 disk made up of 2 larger normal sata disks.

      For example I use:

      a ssd for my OS
      a raid 5 array for my data and backups (3 sata 3 disks)
      a raid0 array for my hm2 databases (2 sata 2 disks)

      I Have very large databases, but do not suffer any speed issues when importing, or note creation.
      Let me know if I can help you further, I dont have experience with pokertracker, but I can help you to create inexpensive fast hdd space.

      regards
      Thanks for trying to help.
      I don't know much about raid.
      My motherboard has 2 SATA 3 ports as well as several SATA 2 and I think it supports raid 0,1. I have an 1 TB 7200 RPM hd which is connected to a SATA 2 port, although I think it supports SATA 3.
      In order to use raid I think I must have 2 identical hds? Can I use an SSD drive and a physical one instead? Should I connect them to SATA 3 or SATA 2 ports? Will it be as fast as an SSD drive?
      Is there a site or online article I can refer to for more information?
      Thanks again for your help.