SSS and suited hands question

    • Fiftyshuffle
      Fiftyshuffle
      Bronze
      Joined: 19.09.2008 Posts: 17
      Hello,

      I have a question concerning the short stack strategy:

      Why doesn't the SSS (and the Starting hands chart) take into account if starting hands are suited?
      I think I understand that it matters less because most hands are decided preflop or on the flop (where a flush is usually not made yet) ...
      But I would guess that it still matters if your hand is suited or not?

      Thank you for answering,

      Simon
  • 6 replies
    • Horin
      Horin
      Bronze
      Joined: 06.06.2008 Posts: 137
      I guess it is because as short stack you usualy try to get premium hand, put all your money in the middle as soon as possible and win it against one oponent with top pair top kicker.

      On the other hand chasing flushes is profitable against many oponents while both you and them have deep stacks.

      + according to equitator with AKo against random hand you have 65% chance to win and with AKs you have 67% chance to win so it affects chances very little.
    • TheBu11d0g
      TheBu11d0g
      Bronze
      Joined: 25.07.2008 Posts: 2,019
      If you are starting out on NL10 then it is best to stick to the SHC religously until you totally and completely understand and can play without any mistakes.
      Then once you get to NL25 you can limp in with low pairs (22-66), suited A's and suited connecters (from 76s) but only in the CO/BTN or SB and then only with 3,4, or 5 limpers accordingly.

      Hope this helps

      Regards,

      Steve
    • delete461
      delete461
      Bronze
      Joined: 04.07.2008 Posts: 1,036
      If you are dealt two suited cards, the chances of making a flush are about 30/1. The point of the SSS is to avoid making decisions postflop - you either push all your chips in or fold as soon as possible, and the 3% chance of making a flush is far too small to make you push all your chips in at the beginning. With a big stack it is different, if you can see a cheap flop you have enough chips to start figuring implied odds if you flop a flushdraw.

      Example if you have to call 1 or 2 big blinds to see a flop, you will make a flush one time out of 30. Therefore you must win 30 or 60 blinds off every flush to make it profitable, but with SSS you only have 20 or so BB at the table, so that is all you can take off your opponent
    • DE4DLY
      DE4DLY
      Bronze
      Joined: 27.01.2007 Posts: 109
      Originally posted by delete461
      If you are dealt two suited cards, the chances of making a flush are about 30/1. The point of the SSS is to avoid making decisions postflop - you either push all your chips in or fold as soon as possible, and the 3% chance of making a flush is far too small to make you push all your chips in at the beginning. With a big stack it is different, if you can see a cheap flop you have enough chips to start figuring implied odds if you flop a flushdraw.

      Example if you have to call 1 or 2 big blinds to see a flop, you will make a flush one time out of 30. Therefore you must win 30 or 60 blinds off every flush to make it profitable, but with SSS you only have 20 or so BB at the table, so that is all you can take off your opponent
      I just switched from limit to NL SSS because it seemed the limit games were little too grindy (I get into a rut and just seem to gravitate toward a break-even game)
      Anyway... I was wondering about this suited point in SSS and so I searched the forum and found this post.
      It helped me understand the point behind SSS so I thought I'd bump it. I think the basic SSS article would benefit from explaining this point, because I was sorely tempted to play things like KQs in late with no previous action.
      Maybe it is in there but I just missed it anyway, I found this post a great help so thanks.
      ;)
    • alejandrosh
      alejandrosh
      Bronze
      Joined: 02.07.2008 Posts: 4,346
      KQs is a raising hand in late position, also KQo on starting hand chart.
    • DE4DLY
      DE4DLY
      Bronze
      Joined: 27.01.2007 Posts: 109
      Originally posted by alejandrosh
      KQs is a raising hand in late position, also KQo on starting hand chart.
      8) You are right! How could I have missed that?
      Maybe I should sleep once in a while...

      *wanders off wondering how he manages to cross the street, tie his own laces, etc,...*