Session reviews

    • Kokuruz
      Kokuruz
      Bronze
      Joined: 08.07.2014 Posts: 50
      Hello again!
      So I'm still going through that How to conduct a session review: page 2 and I got really confused at the first review at the first point, where it says that we need to determine pushing range and in the article it comes to this a bit wierd number of HC which I don't quite get how. I mean I guess if the stat would be 3bvBU then since in this case we are in the CO we can assume that against us his 3bAI is a bit tighter but this is a general 3b stat so it got me a bit confused.
  • 5 replies
    • Lazza61
      Lazza61
      Headadmin
      Headadmin
      Joined: 23.03.2011 Posts: 10,141
      Hey Kokuruz,

      HC merely refers to the number of unique hand combinations that the % represents.

      There are 1326 unique hand combinations and 12.22% =162 (on my calculator it actually says 162.0372)

      I hope this answers your question.

      Regards

      Laz
    • Kokuruz
      Kokuruz
      Bronze
      Joined: 08.07.2014 Posts: 50
      Yes I understand the stuff about HC but I don't understand based on what stat or based on whick mathematical formula he got that number of HC.
    • VorpalF2F
      VorpalF2F
      Super Moderator
      Super Moderator
      Joined: 02.09.2010 Posts: 9,504
      Hi, Kokuruz,

      I'm not *exactly* sure what section of the article you are referring to.

      If I guessed wrong, perhaps you could cut and paste the section you have questions about.

      If opponents range is given as:

      QQ+, AKo+, AQs+ then his range is:
      Q:hQ Q:hQ Q:hQ Q:dQ Q:dQ Q:cQ -- 6 combos
      There are also 6 combos of KK and AA
      Total: 18 combinations

      You can do this mathematically: The formula for taking r objects from a set of n objects is:
      n!/r!(n-r)! (See http://www.mathwords.com/c/combination_formula.htm)
      n! means n factorial
      In our case n=4 (the 4 queens) and r is 2
      so the formula is 4! / 2! ( 4-2)!
      4! = 24, 2! = 2 so the formula becomes:
      24/4 =6

      For the suited hands, there are 4 suits, so we can have one combo for each suit -- 4 combos.

      For the offsuit unpaired hands for each there are 8 possible cards making up the set.
      We again take them in groups of two.

      8! = 40320 / 2 * 720 = 28
      But we have previously noted that 4 are suited, and for each rank 6 pairs exist, so the offsuit combos total 12.

      So for the entire range there are:
      QQ+ 18 combos -- six each of AA,KK,QQ
      AKo - 12 combos
      AQs+ 8 combos -- 4 each of AQs and AKs
      For a total of 38 combinations in this range.

      Hope that helped...
      --VS
    • Kokuruz
      Kokuruz
      Bronze
      Joined: 08.07.2014 Posts: 50
      I understand the combos but my question is based on what stat from this case can we give villian this range?
      Villian has 18/18 and a 3b of 12.8.
      Since he is 3b us I took a look in the equilab and put in VPIP of 12.8 since this is his 3b range,... well I suppose this is how it goes or am I wrong?
      And if you put a VPIP of 12.8 in equilab you get 171 HC or 12,9% of all HC which is a bit more then what we get in the article.

      To make it a bit easier to understand for you what am I asking:
      When you try to see the villian's entire range you take his VPIP and put it in equilab so that you get a rough presentation on how does his entire opening range look like, well depends on how much bluffy he is.
      Based on this example that I just gave you when we take the VPIP and get his entire opening range, my question is based on what stat or some wierd mathematical formulas did we get this villian's pushing range?
    • VorpalF2F
      VorpalF2F
      Super Moderator
      Super Moderator
      Joined: 02.09.2010 Posts: 9,504
      Although his 3Bet stat is 12.8, in the analysis the used the range of 22+, ATs+, KJs+, ATo+, KQo which is only 12.22%

      Perhaps that thought that this is reasonable for BB vs CO.

      Don't forget the the 3Bet stat covers villain in all positions vs all other positions, so it is an average.

      When you're doing your own analysis, you'll need to put villain on a range.

      The range they chose is just an approximation. Sometimes he may be playing a bit tight, and sometimes he may through a bluff or two in.

      Cheers,
      --VS