On the crossroad - whether to bet on poker or not

    • carpetarsonist
      carpetarsonist
      Bronze
      Joined: 24.02.2013 Posts: 98
      Hi community,

      My name is Bohdan; I’m 20 and live in Kyiv, Ukraine. Nowadays I study on 4th course of university and have been working in my profession for 2 years. I want to go back to poker after a long break, but history first.

      Approximately 1 year ago the job became very hard for me, first of all psychologically. It requires being online 24 hours a day, working week often lasts for 60+ hours and after getting to office at 10 am you never know when you will come back home. It can even end at dawn either in the office or at home. My bosses make quite good money as for Ukraine but the most bewildering thing is that they work even more. Thus I decided to find out over the next two months how to improve life.

      From 10th grade of school to 2nd course of university I was very interested in poker. I made some $500 in SNGs out of bonus $10, but never treated the game seriously. When I received my first good job offer, the choice was between playing even less than before that (4-5 hours a week maximum) and quitting. Reluctantly I decided to do latest and now want to try something opposite – become a professional from the very start.

      I can relatively easily return to my current occupation in 6-12 months. At the end of the day I wanna try something I missed some time ago. And, of course, I love the game.

      My plan stipulates the following: leave the job, invest some $500 in software licenses, two monitors, education etc, take bankroll of $3 000 and play BSS cash that offers time flexibility. So, then I start grinding NL25 or any other limit suitable to my bankroll (I haven’t chosen the room yet). First two months I plan to consciously play with losses starting with few tables at minimum possible limits, long story short to learn. Then I will likely reach 100k hands a month by playing 12 tables simultaneously for 4 hours twice a day, 5 days a week. Learning according to my suggestions will take extra 10-15 hours a week.

      With conservative winrate of 2bb/100 hands I’ll make $500 a month (3-4 months I can live on $300 a month in order to save the rest for the bankroll). In two years I hope to play NL100, win about $2000 a month and live on half of that. After five years of grinding I will continue my education abroad so that get qualification in some other “easier” profession and go back to ordinary civil life.

      Where is my logic wrong and what are you argument for/against such way? Perhaps I’m too optimistic about my ability to become profitable player that quickly or will likely become tired of playing so many hands very soon.

      I will be very grateful for any sort of suggestions.

      P.S. I do know what the dispersion is and how unreliable my calculations may appear =)
  • 2 replies
    • Zanardi1
      Zanardi1
      Bronze
      Joined: 04.01.2010 Posts: 5,602
      Hello Bogdan,

      My best advice is to play poker on the side, while keeping your job. I know that is very tempting to go pro, but poker is a game in which 80% of the players are long term losers. So, it's better to be safe than sorry :)
    • htghguuh
      htghguuh
      Silver
      Joined: 02.01.2014 Posts: 146
      Originally posted by Zanardi1
      Hello Bogdan,

      My best advice is to play poker on the side, while keeping your job. I know that is very tempting to go pro, but poker is a game in which 80% of the players are long term losers. So, it's better to be safe than sorry :)
      Yea I have too agree ;
      Even before playing for a living you have to learn too grind
      All the strategy in the world won't help ,there soon much to this then you will ever believe
      I Never Rate Myself As GOOD Player because it's a game that you're mind has too adapt too
      It's not just cards and strag it's oressure