HUD Layout for FR Tables

    • PidKoker
      PidKoker
      Global
      Joined: 03.06.2008 Posts: 416
      Just wondering what kind of stats do you use for FR... which stats would be good with very small sample size like 10-100 I havn't started datamining. I am only playing NL25 (about to move up to NL50) right now just curious if any stats will actually be useful or just continue playing with no stats?
  • 9 replies
    • toedder
      toedder
      Bronze
      Joined: 27.11.2007 Posts: 215
      I use:

      Name/Hands
      VPIP/PFR/AF/AgFr
      ATS/FBBvS/3b/Fv3b
      Cb/FvCb/2ndB/WTS

      If you only have small sample sizes, definitely leave out the 3bet stats, and always take any stats with a grain of salt.

      VPIP/PFR: For a loose player, especially loose-passive, they get some meaning very soon. If a guy is playing 43/9 after 40 hands, he is loose passive. If a guy is playing 24/21 after 40 hands - he might be TAG, sLAG or LAG. The looser those stats, and the bigger the ratio between them, the faster they do converge. Until you have a meaningful sample, just use them as a hint, not to deduce a strict range or something. If you have, say, 250 hands, consider the stats somewhat consolidated.

      Aggression factor / Aggression frequency: Those are stats that only make sense if used in relation to VPIP/PFR and WTS. Don't put too much into them. They need a pretty big sample to become really meaningful. Before that, they are just a small hint. Very loose pf stats and a high AF can mean two things: A maniac or a guy that is loose preflop, but only continues with good hands and plays them aggressively after the flop. The former is going to have a high A-frequency, the latter is going to have a low frequency. Remember, folds do not count against the AF. So the AF just indicates how big a part of his post flop range he plays aggressively in comparison to the part he plays passively by calling. You can use A-frequency and WTS to see how big a part he is folding, and then deduce how strong he usually has to be. Again, bigger samples needed. With smaller samples just see AF as a hint of how aggressive/passive he is, and whether it fits his preflop stats.

      ATS: The attempt to steal is a good indicator of villain's positional awareness. If it is significantly higher than his PFR, he most likely has a very tight range in EP and is stealing liberally in LP. Play accordingly. If you have a large sample, you can deduce his stealing range and decide on a range to defend accordingly.

      FBBvS: How often villain is folding his BB to a steal. This is mostly directly related to his VPIP, as tight players will fold a lot and loose players will defend a lot. But there are actually tight players that know how to defend. If you have a meaningful sample, you can calculate how profitable a steal against the players in the blinds will be for you.

      Cbet: If a player is cbetting a lot, like > 80% or even > 90% (especially if he isn't particularly tight) he will very often have air and you will have good fold equity with a raise or a float. If a player is cbetting rarely, like ~ 50%, he is going to have a hand more often and you have less fold equity, but probably better implied odds if you're on a draw.

      FvCB: If a player is not folding to cbets often, he is either a calling station and you should cbet less against him, or he is floating a lot and you should 2nd barrel him more often. To find out which of those is the case, look at VPIP and WTS.

      2nd barrel: You need a good sample for this. If a player cbets a lot and 2nd barrels rarely, he is likely to be auto cbetting and only continuing on the turn with an actual hand. This is the type to float against.

      WTS: This can be used to determine how keen a player is on going to showdown. As a standalone value this is not the most useful stat, but if you have a big sample on a guy, it gets pretty useful in combination with other stats. You'll probably need at least 1k hands of an average opponent to count on it. But as with all stats, if it is extreme before, you can see trends already.

      Hands: One of the most important numbers in your HUD, as it tells you how many hands your sample on villain's play is and thus how accurate the different stats are.

      Generally, the tighter an opponent, the more hands you need to have a sufficient sample.

      But I would nevertheless still use a HUD while you only start at a level and don't have big samples on any player. You will recognize stations, maniacs, rocks at one glance. For players on which you have only those 10-100 hands you mentioned, I would concentrate on the preflop stats of VPIP/PFR. This generally gives you a good impression of tightness/looseness and aggressiveness/passiveness. And as the sample approaches 100 hands, have a look at the ATS. Don't take it at face value, but just consider it. If a guy is playing 16/12 over 100 hands and has an ATS of 40%, he is likely positionally aware. If his ATS is 14%, he might not be. But always remember that 100 hands is a pretty damn small sample. I can run anywhere between 6/5 and 35/27 during such a sample. Sometimes I have an AF of 0.7 after such a sample, sometimes it's more like 35 or infinite (as I never called postflop). But also note that I will never run 70/25 or 22/5 or something like that. If a player has a big gap between VPIP and PFR, he is passive. If a player has a narrow gap between the two, he is generally aggressive.

      A HUD is a help when used with caution. As long as you don't overly rely on the numbers, it will help you make a mental picture of your opponent's approach to poker even on smallish samples. For a start - considering small samples and just getting used to a HUD - I would suggest putting

      VPIP / PFR / AF / Hands
      ATS / FBBvS / CB

      in your HUD and go from there. You can add and remove numbers as you like. If you think, a number might be useful, put it up. If you then notice over time, that you don't use it, or use it improperly, remove it again. I have had at least 20 different HUD setups in only 10 months of playing. Working with your HUD is an online poker skill that has to be learned like any other skill. And specific notes on a player > HUD stats. A HUD won't necessarily tell you how villain plays his monsters and how he plays different kinds of draws, HU or multiway. Just always use them as a hint on his tendencies, and it will be of great help, especially when playing more tables.
    • TheBu11d0g
      TheBu11d0g
      Bronze
      Joined: 25.07.2008 Posts: 2,019
      Hey there toedder,

      I have just read your post and wanted say what a great read it was, as well as being extremely useful.

      Well done sir :D

      Regards,
      -Steve
    • PidKoker
      PidKoker
      Global
      Joined: 03.06.2008 Posts: 416
      Originally posted by TheBu11d0g
      Hey there toedder,

      I have just read your post and wanted say what a great read it was, as well as being extremely useful.

      Well done sir :D

      Regards,
      -Steve
      +1.....Thanks alot
    • toedder
      toedder
      Bronze
      Joined: 27.11.2007 Posts: 215
      Thank you guys for the compliments, and I'm glad it was helpful to you :)

      If you have any more questions, feel free to ask away!
    • Tim64
      Tim64
      Black
      Joined: 02.11.2008 Posts: 7,401
      Yeah. Me three. Awesome post.

      Tim
    • PidKoker
      PidKoker
      Global
      Joined: 03.06.2008 Posts: 416
      Should this be a sticky?... I found it EXTREMLY useful.
    • kingdippy2008
      kingdippy2008
      Bronze
      Joined: 30.08.2008 Posts: 2,107
      wow, great post. I play short handed and i also think this is very helpful.
    • Jaissica
      Jaissica
      Bronze
      Joined: 10.02.2009 Posts: 1,385
      Excellent post, ill be stealing your hud layout for my next session :)
    • purplefizz
      purplefizz
      Bronze
      Joined: 12.03.2008 Posts: 4,508
      finally! a much needed post re-using stats. thanks toedder! :heart: