[NL2-NL10] NL25 FR - A,Qs - push on re-raise - vpip stats

    • Tim64
      Tim64
      Black
      Joined: 02.11.2008 Posts: 7,401
      Known players:
      Position:
      Stack
      MP3:
      $15.07
      Hero:
      $6.95

      0.1/0.25 No-Limit Hold'em (9 handed)
      Hand recorder used for this poker hand: PokerStrategy Elephant 0.67 by www.pokerstrategy.com.

      Preflop: Hero is BU with A:diamond: , Q:diamond:
      4 folds, MP3 calls $0.25, CO folds, Hero raises to $1.25, 2 folds, MP3 raises to $5.50, Hero raises to $6.95 (All-In), MP3 calls $1.45.

      Flop: ($14.25) 9:heart: , J:diamond: , 3:spade:
      Turn: ($14.25) 4:diamond:
      River: ($14.25) 2:heart: (2 players)


      Final Pot: $14.25

      I guess I made a wrong decision here, re-raising all-in. In fact, villain had same hand a me, so no harm done (why was he re-raising??). My question is: if I'd had a larger hand sample, would villain's vp$ip (of 50+) ever have meant my push was correct, because of his likely range?
  • 6 replies
    • dandycal
      dandycal
      Bronze
      Joined: 10.10.2008 Posts: 1,711
      Hey Tim,


      I'd have folded this. 7 hands sample should be completely disregarded. And according to your raise:stack ratio, this is a fold.

      Were your hand sample larger, say 100 hands, and villain's VPIP was still 50% and PFR 14% it would be the easiest push.

      AQ is good against a range of 10%+. Bear in mind that stats can be misleading (up to 5% inaccuracy) in samples from 30 to 500 hands (according to Xarry). So you have to adjust your decision with that in mind.
    • Tim64
      Tim64
      Black
      Joined: 02.11.2008 Posts: 7,401
      Ok, thanks. That's useful.

      One more Q: when you say "AQ is good against a range of 10%+", do you mean A,Q will be ahead against an opponent who raises more than the top 10% of starting hands?

      Just starting out with whole concept of ranges, you see....
    • ysessa
      ysessa
      Basic
      Joined: 11.07.2008 Posts: 1,331
      already said fold due to small samplesize, btw on these low limits i would push aqs against 13% pfr you need 52,5% equity to beat the rake.
    • Tim64
      Tim64
      Black
      Joined: 02.11.2008 Posts: 7,401
      Hi ysessa,

      I know I should understand this by now, but I don't. Please can you explain what you mean by:

      "i would push aqs against 13% pfr you need 52,5% equity to beat the rake. "

      e.g. where does figure of 52.5% come from? and how do I work out my equity in a push based on villain's pfr stat. Any chance you could explain or point me to article?

      This is a fundamental concept of poker that I don't yet understand.

      Cheers,
      T
    • dandycal
      dandycal
      Bronze
      Joined: 10.10.2008 Posts: 1,711
      Originally posted by Tim64
      One more Q: when you say "AQ is good against a range of 10%+", do you mean A,Q will be ahead against an opponent who raises more than the top 10% of starting hands?


      Yes, that's it.


      Originally posted by Tim64

      Hi ysessa,

      I know I should understand this by now, but I don't. Please can you explain what you mean by:

      "i would push aqs against 13% pfr you need 52,5% equity to beat the rake. "

      e.g. where does figure of 52.5% come from? and how do I work out my equity in a push based on villain's pfr stat. Any chance you could explain or point me to article?

      This is a fundamental concept of poker that I don't yet understand.

      Cheers,
      T
      Tim, are you acquainted with the Equilator? If not, get it in the download section.

      You calculate your equity based on villain's range, which you deduce from his PFR. In the equilator you can equilate AQ against a range of hands, eg. "66+, AT+" is one range.

      Here Ysessa tells you to push AQ againt a 13% PFR rather than a 10%, because the rake in lower limits end up consuming a large part of our winnings in such marginal situations. So we should look for a larger edge in our equity.

      Does this help?
    • Tim64
      Tim64
      Black
      Joined: 02.11.2008 Posts: 7,401
      Yes it does; very much so. I had a fiddle with Equilator yesterday and discovered the hand range function. It's like someone just opened a door to another world :) Now I begin to see what everyone's been going on about!

      It is difficult for the judges of course, as they don't want to seem patronising, but sometimes knowledge is assumed that isn't actually there.

      Thanks again.