Few questions.

    • BoooGieMaNN
      BoooGieMaNN
      Bronze
      Joined: 17.03.2009 Posts: 28
      Hello,
      Im a new player and ive just received my starting capital. Im about to start playing but theres a few things about SSS that i dont understand quite well and i want to figure them out first.

      1. On the flop, it says that i have to play a top pair, an overpair or any better hand such as three-of-a-kind etc. Do i have to play two pair? If yes, do i have to play any two pair or is there any conditions like with a top pair where your kicker card has to be a jacker o higher?

      2. If i have a flush draw, does both of my hole cards have to be a part of it, o is it also ok if only one of my hole cards and all 3 flop cards makes me a flush draw?

      3.
      Whether you raised before the flop or not, you bet/raise and try to go all-in with ...

      * ... a top pair with a jack or better kicker card.
      * ... an overpair.
      * ... any better hand, such as three-of-a-kind, a straight, a flush, etc.


      I dont quite get this, so, lets say i have an overpair, noone has raised before me, should i bet 2/3 of the pot and wait for the turn or should i directly go all-in?

      That would all for this time, i bet all of these questions have been answered numerous times before, but theres so many topics and i want to start playing as soon as possible so i think asking these questions straight away will be a faster way to get the answers. Thanks in advance :)
  • 3 replies
    • kingdippy2008
      kingdippy2008
      Bronze
      Joined: 30.08.2008 Posts: 2,107
      1. Yes obv try and go all in with 2 pair. Its better than a Top pair Top kicker so This is a made hand.
      2.Its a tough decision this one but considering you should raise with generally a J or higher, your flush would be good most of the time. So yes ;)
      3. You bet 2/3 of the pot, but if that is more than half of your remaining stack then you go all in. If you bet 2/3 on the flop then you should go all in on the turn.

      Good Luck
      -Kingdippy

      Btw if im wrong can someone correct me, i dont think i am tho :D
    • BoooGieMaNN
      BoooGieMaNN
      Bronze
      Joined: 17.03.2009 Posts: 28
      thanks for the answers kingdippy2008!

      theres one more question i got:

      Who do you play against?

      * You need to have at least 7 opponents.
      * No more than 2 of them can be short stacked as well.



      So what exactly is considered ar short stack and a big stack? Should i just consider anyone whos stack is bigger than 2.50$ a big stack? Usually I consider all stacks bigger than 3$ as big stacks and i play if theres no more than 2 opponents with stacks below 3$. Is it good to do so or should i change something?
    • SoyCD
      SoyCD
      Bronze
      Joined: 20.02.2008 Posts: 6,356
      Originally posted by BoooGieMaNN
      thanks for the answers kingdippy2008!

      theres one more question i got:

      Who do you play against?

      * You need to have at least 7 opponents.
      * No more than 2 of them can be short stacked as well.



      So what exactly is considered ar short stack and a big stack? Should i just consider anyone whos stack is bigger than 2.50$ a big stack? Usually I consider all stacks bigger than 3$ as big stacks and i play if theres no more than 2 opponents with stacks below 3$. Is it good to do so or should i change something?
      Hello BoooGieMaNN,

      Essentially there are even $2 stacks that aren't 'short-stack players' since they simply bought in with the minimum - but do not follow a winning strategy with their play. As an SSS player it is important not to sit at tables where you have multiple other opponents playing a similar (very tight) strategy to yours - since you are making your winnings off your loose opponents.

      In general you can say that players over 40BB are most likely not playing SSS. When in doubt you can also check their stats in Elephant (if you are using a tracking program)

      Best regards
      SoyCD