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Bankroll Management question.

    • Cam3r
      Cam3r
      Bronze
      Joined: 03.10.2018 Posts: 2
      Say you have a bankroll of $100 and are playing 0.2 BB microstakes with a $2 buy in. That's perfectly acceptable as you have 50 buy ins. However if you are playing and build a $20 stack at one of the tables that suddenly becomes 20 percent of your bankroll on a single table which is bad bankroll management... As it would still be possible to run into someone with a similar stack and when the stars align you could get it all in and have $20 as risk which is the exact thing BRM tries to avoid.

      So basically, how do you factor your stack size into your BRM. I ask this question because I was on $150 on 0.05NL last night and ran into someone with $90 and folded KK to a 3 bet because I was scared of losing my stack even though if I only had $5 I would almost always make the 4 bet.
  • 7 replies
    • Tomaloc
      Tomaloc
      Gold
      Joined: 17.01.2011 Posts: 7,184
      just how do you get these 3000 BB stacks? the obvious solution is to rathole (leave the table) and join another one once your stack becomes too big.
      the KK scenario is at the very least a setmine unless the 3bet is a very massive overbet (in which case fold is good)
    • VorpalF2F
      VorpalF2F
      Super Moderator
      Super Moderator
      Joined: 02.09.2010 Posts: 11,413
      Originally posted by Tomaloc
      just how do you get these 3000 BB stacks? the obvious solution is to rathole (leave the table) and join another one once your stack becomes too big.
      the KK scenario is at the very least a setmine unless the 3bet is a very massive overbet (in which case fold is good)
      Hi Cam3r,
      Playing deep stacked it quite a bit different that playing w/ 100 BB stacks.
      Bear in mind that your effective stack is only as big as the next biggest stack among your opponents.

      So if you're playing with a $20 stack at NL2, and the other 5 players all have $2.00 stacks, the other 18 dollars doesn't do much for you. But man is sure looks impressive!

      When there is another player at the table with a $20 stack, now you have some decisions to make.

      Overall, I'm agreeing with Tomaloc here -- park the extra. This is especially true in the scenario you mentioned -- ie you stack at one table is a large fraction of your entire roll.

      Best of luck,
      VS
    • la55i
      la55i
      Moderator
      Moderator
      Joined: 27.01.2013 Posts: 8,493
      Normally bankroll management plan doesn't take into account the fact that you could be playing deep.

      As mentioned above, playing deep requires a bit different approach. When you play deep it is possible to make a lot more money. But it is also possible to make huge mistakes that cost a lot of money. For beginners, the second option is often true.
      If you don't know how to adjust: what it means to your pre-flop defending ranges, sizings, overall strategy and so on. Do not play deep.
    • anduke
      anduke
      Bronze
      Joined: 26.11.2007 Posts: 443
      I would say that getting to stacks like you're describing on one table can't be done with just being lucky. If you're getting scared in spots like the KK one, then it's obviously wiser to leave that table and start new ones. I would suggest learning deep stacked play cause you seem to know what you're doing and you could be boosting your bankroll quite a bit by staying on these tables and not playing with scared money next time.
    • Pokamon
      Pokamon
      Bronze
      Joined: 15.04.2006 Posts: 544
      Originally posted by la55i
      Normally bankroll management plan doesn't take into account the fact that you could be playing deep.
      this is just thoughtlessness. you have to factor this in.

      in OPs example it would be careless to play w 20$ having a 100$ roll. as you play less pots so deep, you could loosen up your BRM requirements somewhat, but you cant go crazy having 20% of your roll at stake.

      as a 20 BI BRM is considered the minimum, i suggest to leave the table w 5$.
    • VorpalF2F
      VorpalF2F
      Super Moderator
      Super Moderator
      Joined: 02.09.2010 Posts: 11,413
      You're quite correct Pokamon,
      However, if you look at the BRM articles on this site they assume that we're playing 100 BB stacks.

      In the olden days, when Short Stack Strategy was a real thing, the articles often mentioned that players should not bring more than a certain percentage of their stack to the table -- SSS was for rank beginners who often had stacks of $5.00 or less.

      I do agree that rather than leave the table, it is best to continue and adjust our play to suit the deeper stacks.

      Cheers,
      VS
    • DSharkP
      DSharkP
      Silver
      Joined: 16.09.2012 Posts: 357
      Congrats!! 150$ in an NL2 table lmao!

      When I was play cash I d Def leave table once I double up or on NL2 with 5$ leave table and re enter, but I wasn't too comfortable in playing deep stacked, I always saw it as even if I get KK am I gonna play my A Game. Or will it make me money scared?