Self Analysis Assistance Please

    • STR82ACE
      STR82ACE
      Bronze
      Joined: 01.10.2008 Posts: 389
      Okay, although I am only using the trail version of Elephant, I've collected this data for the month of March. Not really sure what it totally amounts to, or what it is telling me I should work on, so I'm asking for some assistance in determining what I should be concentrating on.

      Total Hands played to date: 8034 (March only)
      VP$IP 15
      PFR 8
      AF 2
      WTS 23

      Not sure what other data might be required, and since I'm still using the trail version, its all I could find. I know it probably isn't really enough for a real honest and critical investigation, but any help would be appreciated.

      If you were to critically analysis the data above and suggest areas for improvement, what would you tell me? Looking for honest feedback.

      Thanks.
  • 5 replies
    • Jaissica
      Jaissica
      Bronze
      Joined: 10.02.2009 Posts: 1,385
      BSS or SSS? FR or SH?

      As SSS VPIP is too high, difference between PFR and VPIP is too high. I dont know enough else about SSS to say more. Im fairly confident VPIP should be 6-10, PFR = (VPIP-1) for SSS over large samples.

      As BSS VPIP is about right on the money for FR, perhaps a little low for SH. Difference between VPIP and PFR is still a little bit too high. I like to sit between 12-18 VPIP 10-15 PFR.

      When the difference between VPIP and PFR is too high it means you cold-call pre flop too often. EG you may often be calling with possibly dominated cards (AQ, AJ, KQ, KJ), calling out of position with legitimate speculative cards too often (small pocket pairs, suited connectors) or cold-calling when you should 3bet.

      WTS isnt a very useful stat at micro because people will showdown rubbish so often. W$SD would be better.

      AF 2.0 is slightly more timid than most ppl like to be but its within decent play range. I like to sit 2.0 - 3.0.
    • STR82ACE
      STR82ACE
      Bronze
      Joined: 01.10.2008 Posts: 389
      FR BSS mostly, NL .02/.04. I started with SSS but it wasn't working for me very well.

      I suspected my VP$IP was in the low range, but maybe its not. I also suspected I was cold calling too often with mediocre hands (almost EXACTLY what you had listed too, very nicely done).

      So basically, to put what you recommend into practise, I should tighten my range up, and more aggressively enter and control the pots I do enter?

      PS - Thanks for your input, much appreciated
    • andyb43
      andyb43
      Bronze
      Joined: 23.07.2008 Posts: 903
      HI All

      I play NL10 BSS FR 20,000 hands, and have the following from Elephant:-

      VP$IP 22
      PFR 12
      AF 2
      WTS 23

      Any comments, input, critisism appreciated. I am not sure where the stats show i could improve my game and iron out weaknesses.

      Thanx
    • Jaissica
      Jaissica
      Bronze
      Joined: 10.02.2009 Posts: 1,385
      Str8 - exactly right :) Tighten our cold-calling range and be more aggressive when we decide to play, especially from late position.

      Trouble hands are any hand where you are mostly playing to hit top pair but can be outkicked if you do hit that top pair (AQ, AJ, QK, KJ, QJ). These hands we play open raise or fold. That is to say, if there are no raisers in front of us, we open raise. If there is one in front of us, we fold.

      In early position (UTG1, UTG2) we fold them anyway as they are often good hands to lose stacks with from when you are OOP.

      Naturally this is player dependant. If there is an open raiser in front of you with stats PFR 30+ then AQ becomes a 3bet hand, not a fold, as we are quite probably in front :) But the big point here is that we maintain our rule with trouble hands - we still raise or fold.

      Then to trim down our cold-call range we try to pick the best time to play good "speculation" cards like 22-99, 45s-JTs. We want to be in position on the flop. That means we play these hands from around MP2/3 onwards. If there is a raiser in front we cold call. If there no raiser in front and the people behind us are either small stack nits or big stacks (dont want to play vs loose small stacks with 67s for example) we raise ourselves, making our hand both a speculator who wants to see a flop *and* a blind steal.

      Now, to compensate for the extra folding you do, we expand our steal range. From BU A2o becomes an open raise hand, if there is no limpers yet. From SB Ax, Kx, Qx, offsuit connectors are all raisable to no limpers.

      Further, from BB every single hand is open raisable against SB if SB is the only other player left and they only completed their blind. Dont let people take limp flops from the SB if its down to just you and him. Raise it and make them fold out. Alot of people will complete 72o from SB thinking "its only 5c" then fold to a raise.

      So what we need to do to push your range to about 15/12 is decrease calling with trouble cards, decrease calling OOP, and increase aggression in late position if no one has raised in front of you.

      Andy, about the same applies to your stats. PFR 12 means you raise about the correct range for BSS FR. VPIP 22 means you limp nearly 4 times more often than you should. This could be innocent (completing SBs) or a huge leak (cold calling 1-gapper suited cards OOP). You probably just need to be a little bit more selective in when you play 22-99 (trying to be IP rather than OOP) rather than auto-playing them every time you get them, for example. In the SB if your hand is worth paying 5c to play its probably worth 35c to see if the BB will fold.

      The advantage of position is something that really needs more emphasis in the bronze/silver articles. If you play 66 OOP and hit the flop, most the time you have to donk-bet for protection, which might scare off people who would otherwise have bluffed or have hit marginal hands. If you miss the flop, you mostly have to check-fold or play a dangerous check-call-donk float line which is pretty clumsy.

      But if you play the same 66 IP and hit, marginals and bluffers will have a chance to throw money at you. This means even from someone who is going to bluff-fold you have made a flop-sized bet in extra profit just from position alone! You then have the option of playing call-along and hoping the villain is aggressive enough to 2nd-barrel the turn or taking the pot down there with a re-raise. Either way, youve done alot better than OOP.

      If you play 66 IP and miss, you still have options. If the villain checks to you, you bet and probably steal the pot. If the flop is an unlikely flop for the villain to have hit or have a draw to (rainbow rags, like 3 7 9) but the villain cbets anyway you can call intending to bet when the villain checks the turn (float). You can fold if you think the villain has a concealed pair.

      Basically everything is much easier, more profitable and your options far better IP than OOP. Selectively playing good drawing hands from position makes them much more powerful.
    • andyb43
      andyb43
      Bronze
      Joined: 23.07.2008 Posts: 903
      Originally posted by Jaissica
      Andy, about the same applies to your stats. PFR 12 means you raise about the correct range for BSS FR. VPIP 22 means you limp nearly 4 times more often than you should. This could be innocent (completing SBs) or a huge leak (cold calling 1-gapper suited cards OOP). You probably just need to be a little bit more selective in when you play 22-99 (trying to be IP rather than OOP) rather than auto-playing them every time you get them, for example. In the SB if your hand is worth paying 5c to play its probably worth 35c to see if the BB will fold.


      .
      4 times too often.........ouch. Mostly completing SB though, I don't like one gappers!

      Point noted on the BB steal, will give a bash.

      I will also work on my positional play iro small pp etc.

      Thanx for your input
      Andy