Basic 99/TT/JJ Post-Flop Strategy

    • xLFC
      xLFC
      Bronze
      Joined: 10.04.2009 Posts: 9
      Hi all,

      I am a beginner playing in the micro limits and I'm constantly facing tough decisions when playing middle-high pairs like 99, TT and JJ (even QQ sometimes) after the flop.

      The starting hands charts say I should raise these hands pre-flop almost always. The problem is that, very often, the flop brings a higher card to the board. So I raised preflop and don't have top pair. What now? C-bet or give up the initiative?

      I often C-bet when there are one or two opponents, but in the micro limits there are usually many opponents postflop. In this situation, I'm usually concerned that someone has a better pair, for example, if there is an A or K on the board. It seems like too much of a guesswork :D

      This seems to be a very common occurrence, so what should be the basic strategy here?

      Thanks,

      xLFC
  • 1 reply
    • Waiboy
      Waiboy
      Bronze
      Joined: 18.09.2008 Posts: 4,877
      Hi xLFC

      If I'm leading you astray here I'm sure I'll be corrected - but:

      For the most part, and given you're playing micro limits, if you have the initiative (ie you were the last to bet/raise pre flop) you should always c-bet the flop v 2 or fewer opponents no matter what the board.

      Always remember, your opponents will miss the board about 1 in 3 times. So if you're heads up, most of the time you will be ahead on the flop. Versus 2 villians you are ahead often enough that the c-bet is +EV.

      Versus 3 villians there are times a c-bet is worthwhile, but I think at the very beginning you are best just to give up the initiative and play according to odds and outs. It isn't optimal play but the spots start to get tricky and at micro limits with little experience giving up the initiative and playing on using odds and outs won't be horrible play.

      After the c-bet, how you continue really depends. I could add some stuff here but ultimately the best thing you can do is learning by study. So much of how you continue is context dependent ie flop textures, nature of your opponent/s.

      Read through the bronze strategy articles and apply this knowledge as best you can. Post hands you aren't sure about in the forums and there are LOADS of players here that will help you with spots you're unsure of.

      Just keep at it and I'm sure you'll start to get the hang of it. Sorry I can't give you a more definitive answer, but the strategy articles are a lot better at giving you the information than I am.

      Hope this helps some. :f_eek: