SSS tables question

    • Avatars91
      Avatars91
      Bronze
      Joined: 18.12.2009 Posts: 2,689
      As the basic strategy suggests, one should only play at tables with no less than 7 opponents, where only 2 of them can be short stacks as well.
      My questions:
      1) Why exactly is it important to have no less than 7 opponents (and why >7?)
      2) What is the smallest amount of BB's your opponents can have in order for them not to be qualified as short-stacks? (e.g. do I leave the table if 3 of my opponents have 30BB's ?)
      3) What happens if I don't follow these guidelines?

      The problem is that it is hard to maintain good table-management because there usually aren't too many tables that match these criteria, and even if I manage to find some, they usually become trash after a couple of rounds (e.g. someone decided to sit out, someone left, other short-stacks sat down etc.)
      It is really hard to follow all these changes if you are multitabling (say >8 tables)
      So I end up spending most of the time checking the quality of tables I'm sitting at while trying to play some poker along the way. It is really energy-consuming.
      How do you deal with that?

      PS. DON'T sitout, it is really annoying. Just leave the table, please.

      Edit: By the way, I'm playing on Pokerstars NL10
  • 4 replies
    • Ishindar
      Ishindar
      Bronze
      Joined: 31.12.2008 Posts: 259
      Originally posted by Avatars91
      As the basic strategy suggests, one should only play at tables with no less than 7 opponents, where only 2 of them can be short stacks as well.
      My questions:
      1) Why exactly is it important to have no less than 7 opponents (and why >7?)
      2) What is the smallest amount of BB's your opponents can have in order for them not to be qualified as short-stacks? (e.g. do I leave the table if 3 of my opponents have 30BB's ?)
      3) What happens if I don't follow these guidelines?

      The problem is that it is hard to maintain good table-management because there usually aren't too many tables that match these criteria, and even if I manage to find some, they usually become trash after a couple of rounds (e.g. someone decided to sit out, someone left, other short-stacks sat down etc.)
      It is really hard to follow all these changes if you are multitabling (say >8 tables)
      So I end up spending most of the time checking the quality of tables I'm sitting at while trying to play some poker along the way. It is really energy-consuming.
      How do you deal with that?

      PS. DON'T sitout, it is really annoying. Just leave the table, please.

      Edit: By the way, I'm playing on Pokerstars NL10
      1) the blinds need to be paid more often.
      2)usualy 25, note that not all players with <25bb are sss players
      3)you make less profit. the more ss players at your table the better your hands need to be to make money in general.

      table management is easy when u use a stats program as it displays the tables stats on the table. also holdem manager has a table manager which opens with the hud showing all this necessary info
    • Avatars91
      Avatars91
      Bronze
      Joined: 18.12.2009 Posts: 2,689
      2)usualy 25, note that not all players with <25bb are sss players


      True, but the rule applies to them too, doesn't it? I mean, you shouldn't play at a table with more than two short-stacked players, which means it doesn't matter whether they are playing using SSS or playing using any other kind of strategy or even no strategy at all - they are shortstacked (<25bb) anyway. At least that is how I understand this guideline.

      By the way, at how many tables would it be best to play for a player that is willing to improve fast?
    • Ishindar
      Ishindar
      Bronze
      Joined: 31.12.2008 Posts: 259
      Originally posted by Avatars91
      2)usualy 25, note that not all players with <25bb are sss players


      True, but the rule applies to them too, doesn't it? I mean, you shouldn't play at a table with more than two short-stacked players, which means it doesn't matter whether they are playing using SSS or playing using any other kind of strategy or even no strategy at all - they are shortstacked (<25bb) anyway. At least that is how I understand this guideline.

      By the way, at how many tables would it be best to play for a player that is willing to improve fast?
      i understand it different, your range is breakeven against another shorties so the less of them the better. u want to make money, not sit there donking money from one shortie to another.

      anyway try to minimise the number at your tables. most sss players are donks and dont follow this rule but thats their loss. on NL100 at FTP its hard to get a table with less than 5 sss players so i set my limit to 4.

      4 tables is good for improving your game. observe all player actions and get a feel for stats and player tendancies. most sss players like to play high volume and most of their earnings is rakeback. some sss players prefer to play few tables but loser and agressive and make good money on winnings. so when u improve u can ramp up your number of tables or chose to play with more percision and play few tables.
    • thazar
      thazar
      Bronze
      Joined: 14.09.2009 Posts: 6,560
      Actually it is not about the stack size so much but much more about the the number of short stack strategist. It does not matter if you got loose players with short stack you do not count them as SS as such