Being committed

    • rubysilesia
      rubysilesia
      Bronze
      Joined: 03.07.2007 Posts: 351
      Got question bout this issue. If I have put more than 1/2 stack I'm committed? Some times I make a stupid call or the situation is very obvious like the draw is completed (or like: I got overpair he calls the flop and the high card pairs giving him trips) and I'm almost sure that I'm behind. Am I committed in this spots as well? I think it's better to save this remaining pocket money and get out of this hands.
  • 4 replies
    • Puschkin81
      Puschkin81
      Bronze
      Joined: 14.04.2006 Posts: 4,786
      Hi rubysilesia!

      To be "pot committed" is a difficult definition because there are so many factors which influence it: your stack size, the stack size of your opponent, the board, your cards, the cards you put your opponent on, the table history, the aggressiveness of your opponent, etc. So it is very difficult to give a general statement about being pot committed.

      Good luck at the tables!
      Puschkin81
    • howard182
      howard182
      Bronze
      Joined: 30.10.2006 Posts: 416
      Defining pot committed is very easy, deciding is less so. You're committed if when the rest of the money goes in, you're best more than <remaining stack>/<final pot> of the time. (More precisely, if your equity in the final pot size is more than your remaining stacks, or simply that getting the rest of the money in is +EV.)

      If you've put in 1/2 your stack, you need to be good at most (dead money and extra opponents makes it less) 25% of the time to be committed, which is usually the case. (Or damn well should be, don't put in that much money if you think otherwise.)
    • Pacer357
      Pacer357
      Bronze
      Joined: 18.04.2007 Posts: 1,807
      I think stack commitment is more important in tournaments then in cashgames mostly because you don´t have the opportunity to fill up your stack if your short in tournaments and if the blinds are big people tend to bluff more so you are often good with hands that have marginal showdown value. For example you raise with AJs pick up a flushdraw and you don´t have more than say 9bb left in the stack you have to get the rest of the stack in even if the pot odds say that you have to fold if the opp pushes or that you know he will call with just about anything that has hit the board. So in my mind commitment is more important when you are short.
    • howard182
      howard182
      Bronze
      Joined: 30.10.2006 Posts: 416
      It's easier to become committed when short, it's key to no limit hold'em with any stack size though.