[NL2-NL10] J9s, made flush on turn

    • LudiCoka
      LudiCoka
      Bronze
      Joined: 01.06.2009 Posts: 266
      Hand was converted using Tonnek's Cake hand converter
      0.02/0.04 (4 handed)
      Known Players:
      CO(Hero):
      $8.76
      BU:
      $3.73
      SB:
      $7.08
      BB:
      $1.94


      Preflop: ($0.06) Hero is CO with 9 J.
      Hero raises to 0.14, BU folds, SB calls 0.12, BB folds

      Flop: ($0.32) 6,7,A (2 players)
      SB checks, Hero bets 0.32, SB calls 0.32

      Turn: ($0.96) 5 (2 players)
      SB checks, Hero bets 0.75, SB calls 0.75

      River: ($2.46) 7 (2 players)

      SB checks, Hero bets 1.90, SB calls 1.90

      It was 6-handed actually, people before me folded.
      Should I play anything differently?
      Main question is about river... should I check that behind due to possible FH now?
  • 4 replies
    • TedKell
      TedKell
      Basic
      Joined: 21.06.2010 Posts: 15
      If your opponent had a Flush or a 6-7 type hand, you'd know about it by now ;P It'd have been re-raised/cehck raised sometime before now. Also, there aren't many players capable of a check-raise on the river playing .02/.04. Many of them are too scared you'll check behind/don't think enough about your hand to do so.

      I think you played it well and got the max value.
    • Mstlc
      Mstlc
      Bronze
      Joined: 14.03.2009 Posts: 4,676
      Make a normal sized c-bet on the flop. Like ~$0.24 is fine. Don't make your draw more expensive then it needs to be...

      Bet the turn of course but here you can make it slightly bigger (like $0.80-0.85).

      River: is a very clear valuebet. Like TedKell said, if he had a full house you'd probably know it by now and there should be a lot of hands in his range he might call another bet with. Again i'd make it slightly bigger thou. If he's calling a $1.90 bet he's probably calling $2.1 or even $2.2 to. If he check/jams the river I do think you have to fold however cause you're quite deep and I don't see him making a check/jam with much worse but that doesn't mean you should bet for value here.

      tl;dr version: Nice hand, just make a slight adjustment to your bet sizes.
    • LudiCoka
      LudiCoka
      Bronze
      Joined: 01.06.2009 Posts: 266
      Thanks for replyes.

      Opponent had Ah2h there actually.

      Make a normal sized c-bet on the flop. Like ~$0.24 is fine. Don't make your draw more expensive then it needs to be...
      About that part... I always bet pot on those flops with hands like TPTK, sets etc... don't wan't to see flush getting there for a low cost. So if I start betting my flush draws differently, it's going to be obvious. So, should I bet those types of hands also lower... about 0.24 as you said? I did c-bet that flop because I represent an ace there and also have outs, not because I want to hit my flush explicitely.

      Also, it never occured to me that I should check behind on the flop as I do represent an ace. Is such a line good in some cases?
    • MaestroOfZerg
      MaestroOfZerg
      Bronze
      Joined: 17.11.2008 Posts: 5,510
      Hi,


      I'm gonna disagree somewhat and go with a 1/2-2/3 c-bet on the flop, simply because the hands you're going to fold out completely whiffed that board. Any hand that actually hit either has a better flushdraw against which we're in trouble, a top pair that they'll never fold to any bet, or some kind of 2nd pair type hand that usually has some backdoor draws which convince people to call with them even more, like 97 or something. So the extra money we're throwing in doesn't buy us anything immediately on the flop, the only value in it is building a bigger pot in case we hit our flush. And since we'll get coolered by a bigger flush sometimes, it's not like we're looking to push the envelope too much against unknowns on this one.

      Mstlc's bet sizing for the turn looks good.

      On the river I'd actually bet less. The fact is it's not impossible for unknowns to show up with boats/better flushes in that spot, not everybody gets the "play your good hands fast" mentality or even cares to. So we're betting because of the Ax hands out there, but we know sometimes we'll screw ourselves over. That means if we manage to bet too big and cause people to fold out Ax hands (after all the flush came in on the turn, the 2nd 7's isn't good news when villain doesn't have it either, it's starting to feel pretty uncomfortable when you have A8 or something), then we're betting into a range we're actually behind of. So I'd go with something like $1.5 to make sure worse hands aren't going anywhere, with the added benefit of not valuecutting myself too much when they do show up with a better flush or a random boat.


      Originally posted by LudiCoka
      Thanks for replyes.

      Opponent had Ah2h there actually.

      Make a normal sized c-bet on the flop. Like ~$0.24 is fine. Don't make your draw more expensive then it needs to be...
      About that part... I always bet pot on those flops with hands like TPTK, sets etc... don't wan't to see flush getting there for a low cost. So if I start betting my flush draws differently, it's going to be obvious. So, should I bet those types of hands also lower... about 0.24 as you said? I did c-bet that flop because I represent an ace there and also have outs, not because I want to hit my flush explicitely.

      Also, it never occured to me that I should check behind on the flop as I do represent an ace. Is such a line good in some cases?
      I agree with you that if you bet smaller your play becomes transparent and it's bad against good, observant players that you play with long enough for them to draw conclusions. It's nl4 tho, the vast majority of people there are incapable of reading into it or are gone too fast to pick up on anything. Pick your spots, if you're up against a fish there is no reason to worry about balance, if you're playing against a random reg likely it's the same. If you somehow end up against a reg whom you believe to be better than the rest, maybe you can try and stay balanced just in case.

      As for the checking behind to represent the A line, it is good in some cases but mostly against people capable of deep leveling thinking. Most people will not think you're representing the A when you check back an A-high flop especially at nl4. I believe it's good to be thinking about that stuff for your development as a player, but I wouldn't try and apply it anywhere near nl4. If you check behind an A it has to be with the intention of making people believe you don't have one, like on dry A-high board when you have position on a guy who's usually check/folding air but might start bluffing at you if you check back.


      Hope it helps.