[NL2-NL10] NL2 55, shove flop?

    • DannyG13
      DannyG13
      Bronze
      Joined: 28.10.2009 Posts: 1,150
      Hand converted with online PokerStrategy.com hand converter:

      Play hand

      $0.01/$0.02 No-Limit Hold'em (5 handed)

      Known players:
      CO:
      $2.62
      BU (Hero):
      $2.07
      SB:
      $2.00
      BB:
      $2.00
      MP3:
      $2.03


      Preflop: Hero is BU with 5, 5.
      MP3 folds, CO raises to $0.07, Hero calls $0.07, 2 folds, BB folds.

      Flop: ($0.17) 3, 2, 4 (2 players)
      CO bets $0.10, Hero raises to $0.30, CO raises to $0.86, Hero raises to $2.00, CO calls $1.14.

      Turn: ($4.17) 3 (2 players)


      River: ($4.17) T (2 players)


      Final Pot: $4.17.

      My play on the flop here good? I'm thinking I have a good 10 outs here and there's a strong chance im already ahead to a lot of AJ+ sort of hands. Just calling the flop and re-evaluating on the turn is another option, but if a Q/K comes I won't have a clue where I am as most people are leading out here with any picture cards. Thoughts?
  • 3 replies
    • EmanuelC16
      EmanuelC16
      Bronze
      Joined: 02.01.2010 Posts: 13,897
      The only 2 hands against which you really run bad is AA and 66 as it takes away 4 (2xA or 6 for your straight and 2x5 would give them a better hand) of your outs. Against any other overpair or set you have 10 clean outs on the flop so your are ~40% to win it. I think the right move would be to call on the flop because you are IP and still ahead of Ax, Kx and Qx, Jx he might have raised pre. If you know he might commit himself with hands such as AJ+ it does make sense to shove it here. Else I sincerely believe a call is more profitable in the long run.

      Good luck!
    • blackops888
      blackops888
      Bronze
      Joined: 25.04.2010 Posts: 502
      Hey man... First of all, once you have the button and this game is SH, the best play pre-flop would have been a raise right on the spot. That would either make him fold pre-flop or put him on the defense on the flop, intead of donk-betting. Notice that if you raised his bet of $0.07 to something around $0.22 pre-flop, the fold equity you might create could have avoided that raise-reraise battle on the flop.

      As we don't have reads on this guy, things get a bit more complicated. I saw people shoving on this spot on NL2 just because they had a random Ace and found themselves with a straight-draw. That might have been the case here. Other situations also include his possibility of having hit a set.

      It is important to notice that this whole situation could have been avoided if you had raised him pre-flop, got it? But once things got to this point, you actually had to make that $0.30 raise on the flop and shoved just like you did, considering your overpair and straight-draw outs.

      That said, considering the way things developed, it seems to me you did what was left to do, although I repeat that all of this could have been avoided by that pre-flop raise.
    • MaestroOfZerg
      MaestroOfZerg
      Bronze
      Joined: 17.11.2008 Posts: 5,510
      Hi,

      Originally posted by EmanuelC16
      The only 2 hands against which you really run bad is AA and 66 as it takes away 4 (2xA or 6 for your straight and 2x5 would give them a better hand) of your outs. Against any other overpair or set you have 10 clean outs on the flop so your are ~40% to win it. I think the right move would be to call on the flop because you are IP and still ahead of Ax, Kx and Qx, Jx he might have raised pre. If you know he might commit himself with hands such as AJ+ it does make sense to shove it here. Else I sincerely believe a call is more profitable in the long run.

      Good luck!
      Agreed. If he can't continue to a raise with something like AQ there is just no point in raising to "protect" from overcards. Having 40% equity against a stackoff range when the pot is so small only means we'll be forcing ourselves to go broke as an underdog, as people with better hands then us will never ever fold.

      Seeing an overcard on the turn isn't something you should be scared off, it's just more information for you to make better decisions. If you happen to have a good hand and you believe seeing a turn card with lose you action or make you loose the hand, by all means you want to go broke on the flop. Not so when your hand isn't strong to begin with. If you always shortcut your way to showdown by going broke on the flop every time the turn could get ugly, you'll first play many hands sub-optimally and you also won't be able to gather late streets experience, which is very important if you plan on moving up the poker ladder.


      Hope it helps.


      hope it helps.