SnG wizard push range

    • mTxFaT
      mTxFaT
      Bronze
      Joined: 22.01.2010 Posts: 59
      Hey folks,

      I just started playing SnG tournmanets. After playing 1, I looked at it in SnG Wizard.

      In heads-up, with blinds 600/300, I am in SB with 6340, my opponent BB-6560+ his big blind. SnG wizard gives 100% push range. I don't wanna push 36o :(

      Also, there is Edge%, it's set to be 0.15%, should that edge% be 0.5% or so to get proper push ranges ?

      Thanks
  • 7 replies
    • BOBOsvk
      BOBOsvk
      Bronze
      Joined: 14.02.2010 Posts: 2,505
      if you dont want to push dont push
      if you dont want to push according to sng wiz dont use it

      simple as that
      simply clever - skoda
    • pzhon
      pzhon
      Bronze
      Joined: 17.06.2010 Posts: 1,151
      The default should be to set the edge to 0. Only use a nonzero edge if you have a clear reason to pass up a profitable push according to the ICM, or to make a push which loses according to the ICM.

      To get good advice from SNG Wizard, you must adjust the ranges it gives your opponents. The default ranges SNG Wizard gives are often too tight against small blind shoves, and too loose against shoves from outside the blinds. The result is that if you don't adjust the default ranges, SNG Wizard very often says to push ATC from the small blind, but to push very tightly outside the blinds, particularly from the CO and earlier.

      Initially, you will not know how to adjust SNG Wizard's ranges. As you get better at putting your opponents on a range, SNG Wizard will become more valuable. Some steps you can take toward learning to put your opponents on good ranges include the following:

      1) Ask what the game-theoretically optimal range is. Use a tool like PokerStrategy's ICM Trainer, or the HoldemResources.net Nash equilibrium calculator. It is very valuable to learn how the game-theoretically optimal ranges vary even when you play against real opponents.

      2) Ask what you would push/call in that situation. Of course, your opponents do not play exactly as you do, but put yourself in the big blind's position. What would you call? Then find out what the small blind should push against a player who plays that way.

      3) Ask what you believe your typical opponents call in situations like that. Some players are just good at remembering how often they get called. Others remember particular hands. Be careful that you will see some outliers, and you don't get to see a hand when an opponent folds. If one player calls with 98o, and another folds QTo, you get to see the call and not the fold, and you should not assume that all players call with 98o and anything better. You can use a database program to investigate calling frequencies in particular situations once you have a large sample.

      4) Take notes on particular opponents. Develop better stereotypes of players (e.g., the tight-early aggressive late multitabler, or the 70/30 early casual player), and better models of particular players.
    • pzhon
      pzhon
      Bronze
      Joined: 17.06.2010 Posts: 1,151
      For this particular hand, the range you give your opponent should depend on the stake level and your reads on this particular opponent. At some levels, the typical calling range for a 10 bb push is about 35%, slightly tighter than the Nash equilibrium calling range. That means you should push slightly wider than the Nash equilibrium pushing range, but not ATC, and not 63o.

      Click on the Call% for the big blind in SNG Wizard, and move the slider to about 35%. At 34.8% calls, you can profitably push a 62.3% range which includes 65o, but pushing 63o would cost 0.21% of the prize pool, a little less than 2% of a buy-in.

      You can also click on the colored rectangle next to the Call%, or on the graph button when there is no colored rectangle. This shows you how the equity of pushing 63o changes as you change the calling range. To push 63o profitably, you need the big blind to call about 29% or less. 32o and 72o could be pushed if the big blind would call 26% or less.
    • mTxFaT
      mTxFaT
      Bronze
      Joined: 22.01.2010 Posts: 59
      Hey pzhon,

      great answer, thanks a lot man.
    • asanine
      asanine
      Basic
      Joined: 27.02.2011 Posts: 1
      Good evening,
      I am looking for a software that displays the Nash equilibrium solutions for push/fold situations. I want the program to show me simultaneously the equilibrium solutions taking into account stack sizes (mine and the other players) and not after the hand (like sng wizard), like I’ve “pinned” it on the pokertable or something like that. I know about Holdem resources but it's not very practical when i have 8-10 tables open, thats why i want it to show me simultaneously tha equilibrium. if anyone knows anything I would be thankful.
    • goldchess
      goldchess
      Bronze
      Joined: 17.02.2010 Posts: 641
      that would be called cheating ;)
    • evertonroar
      evertonroar
      Bronze
      Joined: 26.06.2009 Posts: 737
      Originally posted by asanine
      Good evening,
      I am looking for a software that displays the Nash equilibrium solutions for push/fold situations. I want the program to show me simultaneously the equilibrium solutions taking into account stack sizes (mine and the other players) and not after the hand (like sng wizard), like I’ve “pinned” it on the pokertable or something like that. I know about Holdem resources but it's not very practical when i have 8-10 tables open, thats why i want it to show me simultaneously tha equilibrium. if anyone knows anything I would be thankful.
      im looking for a program that will play perfect poker for me and win lots of money while i spend it. anyone?