Hey everybody! Tips on how to analyze your session??

    • Sashalyuber
      Sashalyuber
      Bronze
      Joined: 19.01.2010 Posts: 52
      Hey all you lovely sng players! :f_love: I am quite the newbee, only been playing for a couple months... :f_biggrin: Anyway I am looking for the best way to analyze a session.

      I am looking for tips, specific things I should pay attention to, how to discover leaks... and so on! =D

      Also what in the bleeep is a sweat session! They sound yummy so I am also looking for a partner!

      Ps I currently have a pirated copy of holdem manager :P That I use to review my sessions. And am looking for a free sngwiz to =D God I'm terrible!

      Anyho thanks in advance for what I am sure will be great help!

      One last question... I currently play DoN's (I am just trying to build up my bankroll) =) And I am wondering to Turbo or Not to Turbo?
  • 4 replies
    • pzhon
      pzhon
      Bronze
      Joined: 17.06.2010 Posts: 1,151
      Welcome.

      Be careful about starting with DoN tournaments. They don't really prepare you for any other form of poker. If you play 50-30-20 SNGs, this can prepare you to play MTTs, cash games, DoNs, HU SNGs, etc.

      I don't recommend using a pirated version. The reward:risk ratio doesn't seem right. If the software is helpful, then it will pay for itself, and paying for it means you can expect the updates to work, and to get help from support. Use the free trial, and if it helps, buy it.

      There are a few things which are called sweat sessions. In one, a friend watches you play, and you discuss the decisions you have.

      It is a bit too general to ask about your leaks, but try writing down some decisions you found difficult, and then use the hand evaluation forums. Sometimes you might find that a play you thought was close was clear to others, which may indicate some leaks. E.g., if you weren't sure whether to push JTs, and the consensus is to push 76s+, then you may be missing profitable pushes with T9s, 98s, and 87s.
    • muel294
      muel294
      Bronze
      Joined: 06.06.2009 Posts: 1,207
      This is something that I was wondering about also. At the moment I am currently using SNG wiz to review my sessions and just looking at the decisions that were close or incorrect by SNGwiz.

      I seem to find that I am not shoving ATC when it folds to me in the SB HU vs BB often enough when shorstacked. Also it seems I am losing a ton of chips in the SB and BB although I guess that is pretty standard.

      Is this the right approach?
    • lennonac
      lennonac
      Global
      Joined: 02.05.2009 Posts: 1,421
      They way <3 Tim64 and myself found really took our games to the next level was to fire up HEM replayer of a game and play through each hand.
      As Pzhon said spots you think are easy others may not and vise versa.

      If there was a spot that even one out of three of us wasn't 100% on we imported the hand into wiz and checked it out. Make sure to play with the ranges and not just see if that hand was a good push or not but look at what else you could have pushed in the same spot.

      Doing it this way you improve your push fold game and your general game at the same time.

      I can't recommend it enough find a buddy and review once or twice a week and within a month you will be 10x better and so will your study buddy :D
    • pzhon
      pzhon
      Bronze
      Joined: 17.06.2010 Posts: 1,151
      Originally posted by muel294
      This is something that I was wondering about also. At the moment I am currently using SNG wiz to review my sessions and just looking at the decisions that were close or incorrect by SNGwiz.

      I seem to find that I am not shoving ATC when it folds to me in the SB HU vs BB often enough when shorstacked.
      It sounds like you are not adjusting the default ranges used by SNG Wizard. This is a serious mistake which can damage your game.

      SNG Wizard's default ranges are very bad. When you install SNG Wizard, there is a pop-up which warns you that you need to adjust the ranges. However, many people do not do this, and some features such as the automatic analysis are very misleading because the default ranges are bad.

      Suppose you have 10 bb in the big blind, and the CO shoves and equal stack. What range would you put the CO on, and what range would you call? Ok, suppose you have 10 bb in the big blind, and the SB shoves for 10 bb. What range do you give the SB, and what range would you call? There should be large differences between these, but in some situations SNG Wizard assumes that the CO shoving range would be about the same as the SB shoving range, and that the BB's range for calling against a CO shove is the same as the BB's range against a SB shove.

      You need a stronger hand to shove through several players than you do to shove through the small blind. As a result, even though you get slightly better pot odds, you need a stronger hand to call a CO shove than you need to call a SB shove. SNG Wizard often assumes that players will make spite calls against CO shoves, so that you have to push tightly from the CO, but will call very tightly against SB shoves, so that you can push ATC from the SB. If you follow this, you can go from a winning player to a losing player.

      As lennonac recommends, go through every hand, including hands SNG Wizard says you got right. Do not trust the automatic analysis. Expect that many regs do not take the trouble to adjust the default ranges, and so they play in a fashion which assumes that players will follow SNG Wizard's bad default ranges.

      It is better to look more carefully at every hand in 1 in 10 tournaments that you play than to get bad feedback on every tournament.