[NL2-NL10] fold AJs - really?

    • farbwenz
      farbwenz
      Bronze
      Joined: 01.01.2010 Posts: 359
      I've got no reads about opponents play. is this line really profitable?


      Hand was converted using Tonnek's Cake hand converter
      0.02/0.04 (8 handed)
      Known Players:
      UTG3:
      $4.06
      MP1(Hero):
      $3.06
      MP2:
      $4.70
      MP3:
      $1.76
      CO:
      $4.18
      BU:
      $4.12
      SB:
      $5.54
      BB:
      $4


      Preflop: ($0.06) Hero is MP1 with A J.
      UTG3 folds, Hero raises to 0.16, MP2 folds, MP3 raises to 0.28, CO folds, BU folds, SB folds, BB folds, Hero folds
  • 3 replies
    • MaestroOfZerg
      MaestroOfZerg
      Bronze
      Joined: 17.11.2008 Posts: 5,510
      Hi,


      Rebuy to 100bb.

      I'm not folding to the min3bet with an hand like AJs, we can always outdraw hands like QQ-KK with our A and we can also make nutted trips/straights/flushes to crack all premiums. Only real problem is not to get stuck into check/calling down if villains continues to bet strong postflop on multiple streets, as it often indicates our hand is no good.


      Hope it helps.
    • farbwenz
      farbwenz
      Bronze
      Joined: 01.01.2010 Posts: 359
      thanks, I already wondered. In the starting hand charts it says at "if there was one raise after you"
      Fold all other hands, including AK and AQ, hard as it may be for you to do so. You can, however, make an exception to this rule when you have a pocket pair.
    • MaestroOfZerg
      MaestroOfZerg
      Bronze
      Joined: 17.11.2008 Posts: 5,510
      Hi,


      The starting hand charts are designed to make the play extremely simple for new players. In order to do that, the staff created easy, generic rules based on experience that make you cut some corners, hence resulting in easy-to-play lines at the cost of losing some value all around. As you evolve as a player and gain experience, you'll tend to stray away from hand charts and take harder-to-play, but more profitable lines when you feel you can handle the actual playing on later streets. When you become good, you have no more charts, just an overall understanding of poker situations and the ability to decide on your own what plays are the most profitable.

      In that particular situation, it was judged that new players are unlikely to handle postflop play correctly, which often results in them losing a lot of money postflop even if the preflop call was profitable for an experienced player. Like calling AJs and then calling down for a stack on J4265r against a villain who's incapable of betting Jx for value all the way, meaning they get shown QQ+ at showdown always and blow away 90bb postflop because they talked themselves into calling 3bb more preflop.

      So the SHC will keep you out of trouble, which means you'll bleed away less money, at the cost of avoiding tough spots that make you grow as a player but abuse your bankroll. Depending on what your goal is, you might want to forget the SHC after a few thousands hands just to get a basic framework at the cost of progressing slower bankroll-wise since you will lose stacks in difficult spots, or keep the SHC around for a lot longer until you feel comfortable enough with the money and your play to take the next step.


      Hope it helps.