Strategy for high blind play with 6+ players?

    • Cagey
      Cagey
      Bronze
      Joined: 05.07.2011 Posts: 99
      Hi,

      I've just taken this $50 free bankroll and have started playing $1 SNGs on Party. I find these games frequently get to the stage when blinds are up to about 400-800 and can still have 6 or so players still in, with most people approximately equal stacked. I find the blinds rise really fast, so you have some high levels where you don't even get an opportunity to steal.

      I have no idea what the strategy should be at this point, as you have almost 0 fold equity at any point and whenever you get a hand which ICM would dictate as an ok push (ie mid pockets from around utg with 6 people when the blinds about to take a 3rd of your stack) you will get multiple all in callers, which obviously devalues the hand a lot. As I think most FE is lost, I'm kind of coming to the conclusion results are a lot more heavily weighted on the luck of the hands.

      In comparison to my accounts on tilt and stars where looking at my results I can see that I have a lot more 1st 2nd and 3rd finishes, on party i have almost and equal amount of finishes from about 6/7th to first.

      Are there any tips to conquer this time in the SNG? or so I don't get in this situation (I was thinking perhaps play looser than normal at the start to try and get a stack up?) It's comming to a stage where i am starting to tear my hair out.... so any advice would be greatly appreciated!

      Also, is it just me or is a 20 cent rake for a $1 sng disgusting?

      Cheers in advanced!
  • 4 replies
    • ionasnorbert
      ionasnorbert
      Bronze
      Joined: 15.11.2010 Posts: 407
      Hello!

      Yes indeed the rake is super disgusting! I started playing on party because my main account is locked on FTP, so i had some money on Party and gave it a shot. The first few sngs i played it was very difficult for me to adapt to these blind levels.
      First i would suggest you start pushing all the +ev spots you find. Analyze your hands, you can push very wide from the BTN and CO.

      My BTN and CO Preflop raise is around 35% and going up as the blinds get higer.

      I don't really recommend doing too many -ev pushes from UTG, if you have like 2-3 blinds left its better to fold till your in the big blind and can make a loose call against the SB if he pushes.

      You should also push very loose into the SB even though he was quite loose in the begining. Very loose players in early game tend to fold a lot BVB when the blinds get higher.

      All in all i suggest pushing a lot wider than usual and playing a lot more aggressive. In early game i push preflop a bit wider, if there are a lot of limpers at 50/100 and i have AJo with 20Bbs you can just open push. Also push weaker hands like Ax and KT+ into limpers at high blinds. I think thats how i get the most money. PUSH LOOSE INTO LIMPS! and take every marginal +ev spot you can! Also i find that variance is higher at these blind structures so don't worry too much about running bad.

      Hope this is not too long and that it will help!

      Good luck at the tables,
      Norbert
    • pzhon
      pzhon
      Bronze
      Joined: 17.06.2010 Posts: 1,151
      It is hard for the situation to be so extreme that there is no skill left in the game, although it can happen that you don't have enough of an edge to make back the rake or to make a decent profit after recovering the rake. If you encounter a confusing situation, your opponents are likely to be confused, too.

      If you feel that pushes have no folding equity, then what happens when one of your opponents pushes? Is there a multiway collision? Do your opponents simply not push often? If so, put them on tighter ranges when one pushes.

      One way to have an advantage is to understand the risk aversion better than your opponents. Covering someone by 1000 chips may greatly lower your risk-aversion against them. On the other hand, on the bubble, there are times you have an easy fold while you are getting 2:1 pot odds. You can learn these risk-aversions much better than your opponents.

      You can try some other plays which are not push/fold preflop. If you have a weak hand like 86o from the small blind, and you feel that you would have no folding equity if you open-push for 2 bb, you might try a limp-and-go. This means you limp in, and then bet almost any flop. This gives your opponent a chance to fold a stronger hand like T6o which missed the flop instead of simply calling preflop.
    • Cagey
      Cagey
      Bronze
      Joined: 05.07.2011 Posts: 99
      Thanks, very useful! absolutely no worries about the length of the post! makes it better. I guess attacking limpers does seem like one of the main places to pick up the chip advantage!
      And useful information about looser players getting tighter as blinds increase (im guessing this is only really in regard to micro-limits).
      Pzhon, is the risk aversion you speak of like bubble factor? are there any articles im able to access on this site at silver about it? Ive seen little bits about it and was thinking that was a good way to enhance my game.
      And also is the limp and go tactic only really affective when you're the first person to limp in?

      Cheers both of you!
    • pzhon
      pzhon
      Bronze
      Joined: 17.06.2010 Posts: 1,151
      The bubble factor is one way to express the risk-aversion. You may want to watch my video "Calling All-In" which requires silver status.

      A limp-and-go is much more dangerous if you are trying to bluff more than one person since it is more likely that someone hit the flop.