CountBrass

    • CountBrass
      CountBrass
      Bronze
      Joined: 22.08.2011 Posts: 20
      Greetings,
      I have recently returned to the game after a three year absence. Wow, things have changed a bit in the online poker world !
      Previously I played limit at Pokerstars, and worked my way up to .25/.50 and a half before stopping. And occasionally other sites and a few MTTs. This time round I am learning no-limit. I came across this site only yesterday and it seemed like a happy conicidence that you are starting this course today.
      So I have duly signed up. I hope we can take more than the eight weeks to complete as I am off on my holidays for two weeks in Sept and will be intentionally nowhere near a screen.
      Currently playing .01/.02 NL at Stars and 888. Have opened the capital account at William Hill, my choices being a bit limited because of existing accounts at many of the major sites. Looking forward to learning here.
  • 7 replies
    • UPAY4DINNER
      UPAY4DINNER
      Bronze
      Joined: 27.09.2009 Posts: 21,926
      Hey Countbrass!

      First of all I would like to offer you a big welcome to PokerStrategy.com and to the wonderful English Community Forum :)

      Secondly, I would like to welcome you to the NL Beginners Course.

      Yes, what a coincidence that the day you join us, we launch this course! Sounds like fate to me, right?

      I am sure that with plenty of hard work and effort on your part, you will excel at this course and improve to be a brilliant NL cash game player.

      I hope you really enjoy the course and take the maximum out of it.

      Wishing you every success,

      Gary
    • CountBrass
      CountBrass
      Bronze
      Joined: 22.08.2011 Posts: 20
      OK, down to business. I've not read anyone else's homework before this, so as not to influence my own answer.

      Question 1: What is your motivation for playing poker?

      Playing poker provides for me the rare combination of doing something I enjoy while making money. So, I would like to build more ability in it, so that I can make enough money to keep Countess Brass in a manner fitting to someone of her position and to keep up with the ever-escalating costs of maintaining Castle Brass in a condition fit to live in.

      Seriously though, I would like this to become an income stream and to If I were to reach the point where I can choose not to do the day job, then even better. I also factor free time into the equation - my ultimate aim would be to play enough to also have free time enough to do the other things I enjoy.



      Question 2: What are your weaknesses when playing poker? (What are the mistakes you know you are doing during your games? Are you playing while tired? Are you tilting easily? Want to see the showdown too much? Write as many as you think are affecting you.)

      I think at the moment my weaknesses are:
      Getting caught up in the moment without proper discipline. I've read quite a few good books and taken time to learn them. However, in the heat of the moment and the pressure to decide I still don't think things through properly. The result is making poor decisions - typically that means either getting too scared and folding too much, or getting over committed with weak hands too much. I swing from one of these patterns to the other.



      Question 3: What does it mean to play tight-aggressive? (Describe in your own words what playing tight aggressive is, and why does it work.)

      Well, the strict definition to me means tight - playing relatively few hands, ( say less than 20% vpip) and aggressive, showing a high proportion of bets and raises to calls and folds ( AF, a ratio) . By my current definition an aggressive player has that quality in the ratio of 1.5 or higher.

      One thing, being TAG does not of itself make you a winning player. You can be TAG but still play all the wrong cards in all the wrong positions and bet and raise in the wrong situations. Then of course you would be a losing TAG. So Tight Aggressiveness alone does not guarantee success.

      A profitable TAG would tend to play the best cards, leading more often with bets and raises, and play more hands in late position than early.
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Hello CountBrass,

      Most of the weakness you wrote can easily be fixed with you posting hands. We will start writing feedback to your play. And usually negative feedback will put you into thinking phase and trying to fix all those leaks. It's almost the same as you loose money, you will remember it more than winning part.

      Also experience and playing more situations, analyzing your own situations will definitely help you coming a lot of most of the leaks you wrote.

      Welcome to the Course and Best of luck! First points earned.
    • CountBrass
      CountBrass
      Bronze
      Joined: 22.08.2011 Posts: 20
      Just to say I'm going on holiday tomorrow for a couple of weeks and during that time I'll be Internet Free :D
      So I'll resume and complete the backlog of assignments when I get back. Hope thats ok with you..

      cheers

      Count Brass
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      There is no time limit anymore. Feel free to post the homeworks whenever you have time. Have a nice holiday. :)
    • CountBrass
      CountBrass
      Bronze
      Joined: 22.08.2011 Posts: 20
      Thanks. Well, I've been back a few days and have got back into things.

      Here is my homework for lesson 2.
      Question 1: What do you think you could play differently than suggested in the BSS Starting Hands Chart and why? (Are there any hands you would play differently? Do you have a problem or question about how a specific hand or hands should be played?)
      Based on the lesson material, there are more opportunities than in the SHC to profitably steal blinds, particularly from tight players. As well as the suited connectors in the SHC, you can expand the range to all aces, all suited Kings, offsuit connectors down to 54 and suited one gappers - depending on the ( up to) three people to your left, how tight they are and what their stacks are.

      Another possibility is to raise and isolate limpers - particularly tight players who may only limp in early or middle position with smaller pairs ( so you make money ~6/7 of the flops typically, when they don't hit and fold to a cbet).

      I do have one question on preflop play. Its regarding reraising on the flop - as well as AA-KK this also includes AK and QQ. Its more about the latter 2. Is there a ceiling to the initial raise that you should reraise to "3 x the original raise" - or a point where the original raise is so high that you might as well go all in than reraise?

      If someone ahead raised x BB, then you reraise to 3(x+n) BB where n is the number of callers of the first raise so far. If it gets to the point where x+n is greater than 10, then you are already raising to 1/3 of your 100BB stack - and effectively becoming pot committed. Less of an issue for AA-KK, but what about AK-QQ where all in (so I assume major pot commitment) against a tight large stack is probably a really bad idea?



      Question 2: Do you have questions about your preflop play? Post your hand for evaluation. ( Post your hand in the Hand evaluation forums and provide a link to your hand in your private thread in the Locker Room.)

      My main question at the moment about preflop play is the one above. I find the chart fairly strightforward to follow, though I am tempted otherwise at times. For example, what about limping with small pairs in early position? The chart advises that you call -20 to a raise, but fold in an unopened or limped-only preflop hand. Is there a good reason why 99-22 should be folded in early position, given that the flop is going to be mainly a fit ( set) or fold situation?

      My main weakness preflop todate has been overplaying AK and QQ and being burned by AA and KK. Raising, then either calling or reraising a 3bet preflop, or 3betting and calling or reraising further. I've posted a hand on the evaluation forum with an example, here



      Question 3: What is the equity of AKo against the top 5% range? 5% means 88+, AJs+, KQs, AKo. ( You can either calculate this yourself or use an equity calculator such as the PokerStrategy.com Equilab.)

      46.324% (Using pokerstove, I havent got into Equilab yet)
    • veriz
      veriz
      Black
      Joined: 20.07.2008 Posts: 65,504
      Good job! Homework #2 Done!

      Totally agree with you about the stealing ranges. They can be very easily be balanced with even wider range. Depending on the opponent you can as well put a wider stealing range. Against some shorties you can even steal with smaller raise. But don't overdo the stealing situations. Sometimes you might just put yourself into too many difficult spots if opening with marginal hands.

      Isolating can be very profitable actually since people on lower stakes take the fast and easy line by just Fit/Folding too much. With that you will earn in long run a lot profit. Which means you can isolate with even wider range, sometimes even with the all range which you planned to limp.

      I do have one question on preflop play. Its regarding reraising on the flop - as well as AA-KK this also includes AK and QQ. Its more about the latter 2. Is there a ceiling to the initial raise that you should reraise to "3 x the original raise" - or a point where the original raise is so high that you might as well go all in than reraise?

      Well, if you raising it on flop then pot size raise = Pot + 3x the raise. But the question if we even should overplay our TP or even overpair in such spot? Different boards, different opponents, different conclusions. But yes, if he has rather small stack then you can practically as well go all-in.

      If someone ahead raised x BB, then you reraise to 3(x+n) BB where n is the number of callers of the first raise so far. If it gets to the point where x+n is greater than 10, then you are already raising to 1/3 of your 100BB stack - and effectively becoming pot committed. Less of an issue for AA-KK, but what about AK-QQ where all in (so I assume major pot commitment) against a tight large stack is probably a really bad idea?

      Well, it's really opponent dependent. Really hard to say overall without seeing the spot. I would strongly recommend posting the hand. It can be one way, it can be other way, it can be even third way. :D There is no default way to play the hand.

      Playing PPs can be in long run actually be very profitable, we could even say that you earn the most money with them. You can always try out either you play them profitable or not by check the programs either you are doing great on early position with PPs or not and base according to that. Also I don't even mind if you limp then in on smaller stakes.

      About Question #3:

             Equity     Win     Tie
      UTG    46.32%  37.92%   8.41% { AKo }
      UTG+1  53.68%  45.27%   8.41% { 88+, AJs+, KQs, AKo }

      Hopefully you enjoy the School so far. Some more points earned.