No Limit Beginners course with confidant91

    • confidant91
      confidant91
      Coach
      Coach
      Joined: 02.04.2011 Posts: 5,616


      Dear Pokerstrategist,

      Welcome to feedback and coaching thread of No Limit Beginners Course Coaching by confidant91.

      Coaching information:

      • name: No Limit Beginners Course Coaching
      • coach: confidant91
      • time: monday 20:00-21:30 gmt+1
      • status: basic
      • target group: All Pokerstartegy members willing to learn NL BSS strategy



      What are u going to learn in this coaching?

      Paxis (click link for his german YouTube Channel), KTU and SvenBe created this introductory course for everyone willing to learn NL BSS strategy for german community so now after big success it is time to bring it to english community as well!

      During next weeks we will go together through this course starting from basics, teaching you step by step the simplest means of beating micro limits of NLHE SH while developing solid basis for higher limits. Especially later coachings are interesting even for players who already have some poker knowledge and want to solidify their game.

      We already know that this works perfectly for NL2 and NL5 and we will try to show you how to ajdust it even for beating NL10 during later coachigns.

      Links of previous coaching podcasts can be found in spoiler:

      Lesson 1: 9/3/2015 Getting started with the [SH] Big Stack Strategy Part 1 - Pre-flop!
      Link to article | Recorded coaching lesson 1
      You will learn ...
      • ... why position at the table is important.
      • ... which hands to play pre-flop.
      • ... how to utilize our starting hands charts.

      Lesson 2: 16/3/2015 Getting started with the [SH] Big Stack Strategy Part 2 - Post-flop!
      Link to article | Recorded coaching lesson 2!
      Here you will learn:
      • Your hand strength on the flop
      • How to play different hands
      • Several special rules

      Lesson 3: 23/3/2015 Liveplay with the basic strategy!
      Recorded coaching lesson 3!
      You are learning games by playing them. Our Short Handed Beginners strategy will help you with your first games on the tables - and let you even take profitable decisions on the smallest stakes. In this lesson we simply apply the strategy on the tables to get some practice in reading charts & follow with our postflop guidelines.

      Lesson 4: 30/3/2015 Success through community activity!
      Link to article |Recorded coaching lesson 4
      In this lesson you will learn about the importance of being active in our forum and seeking discussions with fellow poker players - for instance in the working thread of the beginners course, our Bankroll Challenge, the hand discussion forum or our blog section.

      Lesson 5: 06/04/2015 Lesson 5: Five minutes to learn, a lifetime to master
      Link to article |Recorded coaching lesson 5
      In this lesson beginners will learn what a sample career path of a professional poker player looks like. Where do you start learning - how do you progress?

      Lesson 6: 13/04/2015 Adjustments to the beginner strategy - Pre-flop.
      Link to article | Recorded coaching lesson 6
      In this lesson we will show how a beginner can improve his game and develop an advanced beginner strategy.

      Lesson 7: 20/04/2015 Adjustments to the beginner strategy - Post-flop.
      Link to article|Recorded coaching lesson 7
      In this lesson we will show how a beginner can improve his game after the flop and develop an advanced beginner strategy.

      Lesson 8: 27/04/2015 Liveplay with the advanced beginner strategy.
      Now we know how to adjust our game beyond simply applying the charts. Let's test it out on NL2&NL5!
      Recorded coaching lesson 8

      Lesson 9: 4/05/2015 Highstakes Hand Review & Liveplay... NL10
      We move up to the beginner highstakes: NL10. But before we are going to look at a few hands from real highstakes. Would our strategy work there, too?
      Recorded coaching lesson 9

      Lesson 10: 11/05/2015 Field trip to the Fast Poker Short handed tables (Zoom/SpeedPoker)
      In this lesson you will learn what advantages and disadvantages FastPoker tables bring you. Playing quickly more hands sounds like a good idea, but what is the catch, how do we need to adjust?
      Recorded coaching lesson 10

      Lesson 11: 11/05/2015 Learning from you own play: Analysis of a session played by a participant of the course
      In this lesson confidant91 will look through a session played by a member. Was he able to correctly apply our advanced beginners strategy? What can we learn from our own play & analysis?
      Recorded coaching lesson 11
  • 126 replies
    • confidant91
      confidant91
      Coach
      Coach
      Joined: 02.04.2011 Posts: 5,616
      Lesson 1: 9/03/2015 Getting started with the [SH] Big Stack Strategy Part 1 - Pre-flop
      Recorded coaching lesson 1
      You already know:
      The rules of Texas Hold'em

      You will learn ...
      • ... why position at the table is important.
      • ... which hands to play pre-flop.
      • ... how to utilise our starting hands charts.
      • ... which variant to play depending on your free poker money.

      Which hands should you play before the flop?
      A good poker player always answers the question "Why?" first. The answer is simple: in order to win money. But how exactly can you do that? You have to differentiate between two cases: are you in a blind steal situation or do you want to fight for the pot with the best hand?

      At a short-handed poker table 3 to 6 players take part in a game.



      If less than 6 players take part, the early positions are discounted first. Hence at a table with 4 players the positions only range from CO to BB.

      The blinds are of particular importance in poker. If they weren't part of the game, you could simply wait until you are dealt aces in order to move all-in with them right away. Nobody could beat your strategy. However, poker is a game for the blinds. You shouldn't attack them directly from the positions MP2 and MP3. Instead, you should play decisively less hands in these positions and focus on stronger hands compared to later positions. However, in the cut-off, button and small blind you can and should attack the blinds directly!

      The following tables show you which hands to play in any given position.

      A No-Limit Hold'em hand consists of two different cards. The following abbreviations apply:

      A = Ace, K = King, Q = Queen, J = Jack, T = Ten (10)
      "s" stands for "suited" and means that both cards have the same suit
      "o" stands for "off-suited" and means that both cards have different suits

      For example, ATs stands for:
      A :heart: T :heart: , A :club: T :club: , A :spade: T :spade: , A :diamond: T :diamond:

      While KJo stands for:
      K :spade: J :heart: , K :spade: J :diamond: , K :spade: J :club: , K :heart: J :diamond: ,
      K :heart: J :club: , K :heart: J :spade: , K :diamond: J :spade: , K :diamond: J :heart: ,
      K :diamond: J :club: , K :club: J :spade: , K :club: J :heart: , K :club: J :diamond:


      MP2:

      In MP2 you should raise any coloured card to 4 BB if all players in front of you folded their hands.

      MP3, CO:

      In MP3 and the CO you should raise any coloured card to 3 BB if all players in front of you folded their hands.

      BTN, SB:

      On the BTN you should raise any coloured card to 2.5 BB if all players in front of you folded their hands.
      In the SB you should raise any coloured card to 3 BB if all players in front of you folded their hands.

      BB:


      All ranges in one file to save and view whenever needed:

      1. Vertical format:

      2. Tiled format:



      What do the different colours mean?

      Note regarding limpers: If you're holding a hand that you should still raise even when players limped before it was your turn, you should raise to 4 BB + 1 BB for each limper, no matter what position you're in.

      Green hands are the weakest hands you should play. You should play them mostly in order to simply steal the blinds. Furthermore, you should only play them when no one has joined the hand before it was your turn.

      You don't play these hands anymore when ...
      ... there has been a raise before it was your turn.
      ... a player has joined the hand with a limp before it was your turn.
      ... there has been a raise after it was your turn.


      On average, Blue hands are usually better than the hands with which your opponents call pre-flop. Therefore, you should play them when ...
      ... nobody has joined the hand before it was your turn.
      ... a player has joined the hand with a limp before it was your turn.


      You don't play these hands anymore when ...
      ... there has been a raise before it was your turn. EXCEPTION: You are in the BB. In this case, you should continue to play yellow/blue marked hands and yellow hands.
      ... there has been a raise after it was your turn.


      Red hands are your strongest hands. You play these hands when ...
      ... nobody has joined the hand before it was your turn.
      ... a player has joined the hand with a limp before it was your turn.
      ... there has been a raise before it was your turn. In this case, you should re-raise to 3.5 times the initial raise.
      ... there has been a raise after it was your turn. In this case, you should re-re-raise to 3 times your opponent's raise. If there are several raises after it was your turn, you should simply move all-in right away!

      Yellow hands are only relevant when you are in the Big Blind. These hands are strong enough to call with against steals from players with at least 50 BB. You play these hands when ...
      ... there has been a raise before it was your turn from the CO, BU or SB to 4 BB at most.

      You don't play these hands anymore when ...
      ... there has been more than one raise before it was your turn or when there has been a raise from MP2 or MP3.

      Call 20 rule: Pairs have a very special characteristic. It's possible to hit a set with them on the flop without people actually realising. Therefore, you can and should limp with pairs when at least one player also limped before it was your turn. If there has been a raise before it was your turn, you should only call with a pair when your own stack and your opponent's both equal at least 20 times the amount required to call the raise.

      This rule only applies to pairs that we shouldn't continue to play according to the colours in the tables. If that's not the case, we simply continue to play our hand as described in the chart!

      Min-raise rule: If you are min-raised pre-flop, you can basically continue to play any hand that you've raised as long as your opponent's stack is at least 50 BB. In these cases, your opponent is giving you a good price to see the flop and you don't have to win the particular hand too often in order to make this move profitable in the long run.

      If there has been a min-raise to 2 BB before it was your turn that doesn't constitute a steal, you should simply regard it as a limp!

      If you re-raise against a min-raise you have to raise to 4 times the amount of the min-raise + 2 BB for each caller of the min-raise

      Blind posting rule:

      If a new player joins the table and is not willing to wait for the BB to join the game, he has the option to post the big blind right away to be able to join the game. This is called "blind posting".
      How do we treat such a player?
      When it comes to hand strength selection, we simply ignore this player and act as if he had folded. However, if we decide to raise a hand, we have to consider the additional chips in the pot and therefore raise to 4 BB + 1BB per limper.


      What is bankroll management?
      You should always regard the money that you're bringing to a table as an investment, similar to buying stocks. You would only buy those if they promise a profit and a reasonable risk of loss.

      You can achieve the same in poker by using a bankroll management.
      It will tell you in which limits to invest (meaning which limits to play) in order to find a balance between your wish to ...
      • ... make progress and as much profit as possible when winning and ....
      • ... not fall back too far and lose too much of your poker money when you're on a losing streak.

      You want to win as much as possible when having a good run, without being hit too hard when losing. This can only be accomplished when sticking to our 25 buy-in bankroll management. It tells you excatly when to move up in limits once your bankroll is big enough, and when to move down in limits when you've lost too much on your current limit.

      The bankroll management for the BSS beginners' strategy looks as follows:

      • You always buy-in with a full stack (100 big blinds) at a table. 100 big blinds are one "buy-in".
      • You always recharge your stack to 100 big blinds as soon as you've lost chips at the table and fallen below 100 big blinds.
      • If you have 25 buy-ins for the next higher limit, you can move up to that limit.
      For example, you can play NL5 with $125 (NL5 blinds: 2c/5c)
      • If you only have 25 buy-ins left for the next lower limit, you have to move down to that limit.
      For example, you have to move down to NL2 if your bankroll is only $50 again (NL2 blinds: 1c/2c)
    • confidant91
      confidant91
      Coach
      Coach
      Joined: 02.04.2011 Posts: 5,616
      Lesson 2: 16/03/2015 Getting started with the [SH] Big Stack Strategy Part 2 - Post-flop
      Recorded coaching lesson 2!

      Here you will learn:
      • Your hand strength on the flop
      • How to play different hands
      • Several special rules


      Step 1: Determine the category of your hand on the flop

      The first thing you need to do once the flop is dealt is find out which category your hand belongs to. Basically, the following categories exist:

      Made hands: These are hands that improved to a top pair or over pair on the flop.
      For example, you're holding A :diamond: J :spade: and the flop is J :diamond: 9 :heart: 3 :club:

      Special rule - Re-raised/3-bet pots: If you're holding a red hand (see our charts) in a 3-bet pot, you should treat each top pair and over pair like a monster!

      Monster: You're holding a monster whenever your hand is better than a made hand. This includes any two-pairs, trips, straights, flushes etc.

      Strong draws: This category includes flush draws, meaning you're holding two cards of the same suit and there are two more cards of the same suit on the board.
      For example, you're holding A :heart: Q :heart: and the board is 2 :club: 3 :heart: K :heart:
      The second strong draw in this category is the so-called open ended straight draw, meaning you're holding a nearly complete straight with four connected cards and only one more missing.
      For example, you're holding J :club: 9 :club: and the board is 4 :spade: 8 :heart: T :diamond: (any queen and any seven would complete your straight)

      All other hands fall into the category "trash hands".

      Step 2: Determine how to play your hands

      Step 2.1: You've raised before the flop

      Made hands should be bet on the flop, the turn and the river, always with a bet size of roughly 2/3 of the current pot. However, if there is a raise after you've bet, you should say goodbye to your made hand and fold.

      Monsters are stronger than made hands and you should be ready to risk everything with them. Simply bet them just like made hands on flop, turn and river with the same bet size of 2/3 of the pot. If there is a raise after you've bet, you should re-raise to 3.5 times that raise and move all-in against any subsequent aggression from your opponent(s).

      Strong draws should also be bet on flop and turn with a bet size of 2/3 of the pot. If an opponent decides to raise, you should only call if the raise size is the minimum amount (twice your original raise), otherwise you should fold. On the river you will have to say goodbye to your strong draw if you don't hit. Simply check and fold if your opponent bets.

      Trash hands should only be bluffed against a single opponent on the flop with a bet size of 2/3 the pot. If your opponent raises, you should definitely fold. If he decides to call your bet, you should continue to play check/fold if you don't improve from the turn onwards.

      Special rule - Your opponent bets first (donk bet): Against bets of at most 2 BB you should simply continue to play as if your opponent hadn't bet at all. You should, however, make sure that your raise equals at least 4 times the donk bet of your opponent (in case a raise of 2/3 of the pot is smaller than 4 times your opponent's bet). If your opponent bets more than 2 BB, you should only continue to play your monsters with a raise to 3.5 times your opponent's bet. Anything else should be folded.

      Special rule - Nobody raised pre-flop: You should still play according to the different hand categories and continue as if you had raised before the flop.


      Step 2.2: You've only called before the flop

      Made hands should be checked and only called ...
      ... on the flop against a bet of at most 3/4 pot size. If your opponent checks on the flop, you should bet 2/3 of the pot on the flop, turn and river.
      ... on the turn against a bet of at most 2/3 pot size. If your opponent checks on the turn, you should bet 2/3 of the pot on the turn and river.
      ... on the river against a bet of at most 1/2 pot size. If your opponent checks on the river, you should bet 2/3 of the pot.

      Monsters should be bet directly on the flop, turn and river for 2/3 of the pot. If there is a raise after you've bet, you should re-raise to 3.5 times that amount and move all-in against any other subsequent aggression.

      Strong draws should be checked on the flop and turn and only be called with against a bet of at most 1/2 the pot. On the river you should give up your draw if you've missed and switch to playing check/fold.

      Trash hands should be checked from the flop onwards and you should definitely fold them against any bet.

      Special rule - Your opponent checks against you on the flop: If your opponent checks on the flop despite raising pre-flop and you are heads-up, you should bet any hand that you're holding for 2/3 of the pot and then continue to play it according to the respective hand category.
    • confidant91
      confidant91
      Coach
      Coach
      Joined: 02.04.2011 Posts: 5,616
      [size=24][COLOR=darkred]Lesson 4: 27/02/2015 Success through community activity[/color][/size]
      Recorded coaching lesson 4

      In this lesson you will learn about the importance of being active in our forum and seeking discussions with fellow poker players - for instance in the working thread of the [SH] beginners' course.

      Essentially, we'll be showing you around the vast and great community that is PokerStrategy.com.

      Questions to be answered:
      • Why should I discuss poker hands, especially my own, in the working thread of the [SH] beginners' course?
      • How can I post my hand in the working thread?
      • What do I have to take into account when posting and discussing a hand?
      • Where and how do I improve my poker knowledge at PokerStrategy.com?
      • How do I record my progress and motivate myself and other PokerStrategists? (Blogs and their advantages)
      • What's on offer besides poker at PokerStrategy.com?

      [COLOR=darkred]Why should I discuss hands in the working thread of the [SH] beginners' course?[/color]
      Ambitious beginners should always perform a so-called session review after each grind at the online tables. In these reviews you'll analyse tricky situations and hands that you were unsure of in real time.

      However, a beginner usually won't notice most of their own mistakes on first glance, which is why it's important to post and discuss your hands in the working thread. Our coaches and other PokerStrategists will help you find the optimal play in those tricky spots, and point out flaws in your game that you didn't notice yourself.

      Nothing is more effective than reviewing your mistakes within a practical example.

      Apart from that, you can also post and discuss your hands in the open discussion forum with all members of our community:
      Open hand discussion forum for No Limit

      Additionally, you can discuss hands in your own personal blog (more on that later on).


      [COLOR=darkred]How can I post my hands in the forum?[/color]
      First of all, you'll need a tool that saves and tracks your played hands.

      The Pokerstrategy.com SideKick:
      For beginners we recommend using our free PokerStrategy.com SideKick which can be found under "Poker Tools" in the main navigation bar of our website.



      PokerStrategy.com SideKick download

      While you're downloading the application you can have a look at our guide for the tool:

      PokerStrategy.com SideKick guide

      The information within that guide is important as you'll be shown how to install and set up the SideKick, plus how to access your hands in order to post them in our forum.

      The PokerStrategy.com Sidekick has many features, the most important one for our intended purpose is the following:

      Saving and converting hand histories: Save your played hands and convert them easily into the respective code to post them in our forum.

      Choosing a hand within the SideKick:
      We've learned how to install and set up the SideKick, now it's time to play some poker while keeping the application running in the background to track our hands. Once we've completed our session we should open the SideKick and have a look at the hands we'd like to discuss. A good approach is to sort the hand overview by amount lost, this will display hands in which we've lost the most money and makes it easier to search for mistakes. Of course, you can also focus on hands that you were unsure about and discuss them in our forum.


      [COLOR=darkred]What should I take into account when discussing hands?[/color]

      • Posting the hand in the correct forum:
        The first option is to post your hand in the working thread of the [SH] beginners' course:
        Working thread

        You can also use the open forum for No Limit hand discussions:
        Open hand discussion forum for No Limit

      • Choose clear thread titles for the open No Limit hand discussion board:
        The clearer the title of your thread, the more users will look at your hand and take part in the discussion.

      • Example of a sub-optimal title for a hand discussion thread:

        The only thing you can really learn from that title is the limit the hand was played on. People who are used to the term "Pockets" may also guess that it's about a hand in which the active player had a hand within the category 22 to AA. But that's not enough.

      • Example of an optimal title for a hand discussion thread:

        In this case, you can clearly see the played limit, hand and situation the discussion will revolve around. Other users will know right away what this thread will be about.

      • Don't include results in your hand discussion thread:
        Even if other users might be curious, results shouldn't be included in hand discussion threads, not even in a spoiler! Posting results can lead other users to discuss a hand in a results-oriented manner, which should always be avoided when trying to assess whether a poker hand was played correctly or not.

      • Information that should be included in a hand discussion thread:
        It's important to explain the thoughts you had regarding the hand that's up for discussion when you were actually playing it. Without your personal reflection, other players will struggle to elaborate on any possible mistakes you might have made. Their experience and knowledge will help you to prevent errors in the future, so don't be shy to provide information on:

        • Which hands you put your opponent on
        • The playing style of your opponent and whether you adapted your own play accordingly
        • Being overwhelmed by the situation and not really knowing what to do
        • If you'd have played the hand differently in hindsight

      Sample of a hand discussion post:

      Thread title:
      [FR | NL 5 | AA] after Bet Flop/Turn vs. 2 bet again on a bad river?

      Known Players:
      UTG2: €5,34 - 107 bb
      UTG3: €2,00 - 40 bb
      MP1: €5,37 - 107 bb
      MP2: €4,63 - 93 bb
      MP3: €5,00 - 100 bb
      CO: €12,26 - 245 bb
      BU: €6,67 - 133 bb
      SB: €5,00 - 100 bb
      BB: €10,91 - 218 bb

      0.02/0.05 No Limit Hold'em (9 Handed)
      Hand recorder for this hand: PokerStrategy.com SideKick 2.0.10210.1

      Preflop: Hero is UTG2 with A:spade: , A:diamond:
      SB posts small blind (€0,02), BB posts big blind (€0,05), Hero raises for €0,20, UTG3 calls, 3 folds, CO calls, 3 folds

      Flop: (€0,67 - 13.40 bb) K:club: , 7:diamond: , 3:club: (3 Players)
      Hero bets €0,49, UTG3 calls, CO calls

      Turn: (€2,14 - 42.80 bb) Q:spade: (3 Players)
      Hero bets €1,31, UTG3 calls, CO calls

      River: (€6,07 - 121.40 bb) J:spade: (3 Players)
      Hero checks, CO bets €1, Hero calls

      Pre-flop:
      Since I'm first to act and sitting in UTG3 I decided to raise to 4 BB.

      Flop:
      I'm holding a made hand that I can bet for 2/3 of the pot on the flop against two opponents. I'm expecting to get a lot of calls from top pairs and weaker hands.

      Turn:
      The turn didn't really change a lot since I'm still beating any top pairs except for KQ and my opponents should have KJ/KT/K9 often enough.

      River:
      Since I'm still up against two opponents on the river the pot has become quite big and I'm not sure whether I should still be betting 2/3 of the pot with my made hand. This would mean going all-in for me but I'm not holding a monster.

      On top of that, I'm now beat against a two-pair with KJ/JQ and two straights have hit as well.

      Therefore, I decided to simply call the weird small bet of the opponent. Was this the right decision or should I have played differently?


      [COLOR=darkred]Success through community activity[/color]

      Videos:
      Videos are a good option to learn more about poker audiovisually. Our video section can be found within the main navigation bar of our website.



      Video section of PokerStrategy.com

      With the help of the search box you can filter certain terms, coaches or video topics. For instance, if you want to see all videos from our coach double2, simply enter double2 in the search box.

      You can also use the additional search options to filter your results further, for instance, by only displaying videos for the Bronze status or for a certain limit.

      [color=blue]Relevant videos for beginners:[/color]

      No Limit Beginner Course - Introduction into Pre-flop Play (1)
      No Limit Beginner Course - Introduction into Post-flop Play (2)
      W34z3l's Walkthrough - Can you Feel the Maths Tonight?
      Professional Poker Attitude - How To Take Massive Action




      Strategy articles:
      Since you are taking part in an interactive beginners' course for the [SH] BSS (Short-handed Big Stack Strategy) that YOU can help shape, the most important articles can be found in our forum:
      [SH] BSS for beginners - Lesson 1: Pre-flop play
      [SH] BSS for beginners - Lesson 2: Post-flop play

      Of course, there are hundreds more articles available at PokerStrategy.com, all of which can be found in our strategy section (which is also accessible via the main navigation of our website).



      Strategy section of PokerStrategy.com

      The overview page shows you the general topics that are covered by PokerStrategy.com strategy articles. For the moment, the most interesting part is the "Poker Basics" section.



      "Poker Basics" strategy section at PokerStrategy.com


      The two most important articles that beginners should read and understand are:
      The Basics: Odds & Outs
      The Basics: Implied Odds

      Of course, reading all the articles on the basic list is an excellent choice for beginners as well! As soon as you've reached the Bronze, Silver, Gold or even Diamond status, more strategy articles become available in the No Limit section.

      You should also consider taking a look at the "Psychology" section, where topics such as the mindset and attitude of successful poker players are discussed. These will help you to understand the game from a psychological point of view so that you can brace yourself mentally. Some sample articles are:
      Professional Attitude
      How can you protect your money from tilt?

      [COLOR=darkred]Do it the right way: Your personal poker blog and its advantages[/color]



      Your Poker Blogs

      Many successful poker players have recorded their progress in a personal poker blog. Doing so as well offers you a drop-in center where you can ...
      • ... keep track of your progress at the tables for yourself and other users
      • ... meet other like-minded players to discuss hands and strategies while also having fun
      • ... get that extra push to keep yourself motivated

      Of course, it's not only helpful to run your own blog. Having a look at the blogs of other PokerStrategists can help you as well when it comes to further developing your own game. Bad beats, real life stories, interesting winning graphs and hand discussions - all these things can be found in users' blogs, making learning poker a piece of cake!

      Extra advice:
      Join our Bankroll Challenge! Simply set yourself a bankroll goal and be a part of weekly community updates. Not motivated enough yet? We're raffling off a status-upgrade among all participants every week!

      Thread: Bankroll Challenge


      [COLOR=darkred]Apart from poker: Recreation - Relaxation - Other Topics:[/color]
      PokerStrategy.com has more than 7 million registered members world-wide and a lot of them are from England and active in the english community forum. So what else is on offer there apart from poker strategy and hand discussions?

      We have a section for general topics at PokerStrategy.com which beginners should explore if they have any questions, want to introduce themselves to the community, or submit feedback and ideas.



      General section of the PokerStrategy.com forum


      The section "Small Talk", as you might have guessed already, offers a broad range of different topics to discuss.



      Small Talk section of the PokerStrategy.com forum

      Apart from that, you can find a lot of other threads and discussions that revolve around non-poker topics as well. For instance, if you're interested in GIFs the following thread is definitely worth a look:



      The GIF thread

      Simply choose a topic you're interested in and you should be able to find threads and discussions about it in our community forum.


      Attention though!
      [I]Don't forget your main goal of becoming a better poker player! Don't lose yourself for the day browsing through all sorts of random topics on our sub-forums. ;) [/i]
    • Post removed

    • confidant91
      confidant91
      Coach
      Coach
      Joined: 02.04.2011 Posts: 5,616
      Lesson 5: Five minutes to learn, a lifetime to master
      Recorded coaching lesson 5

      In this lesson beginners will learn what a sample career path of a professional poker player looks like.

      The lesson is divided into 4 major stages and an additional bonus part:
      • Stage 1 - Playing poker with a strategy (NL 2 - NL 5)
      • Stage 2 - Basic concepts and thinking in ranges (NL 10)
      • Stage 3 - Hand reading and exploits
      • Stage 4 - Playing with an adaptive game plan


      Stage 1 - Playing poker with a strategy on lower limits



      Link to the overview page

      What's special about this stage?
      Beginners who follow this course don't need a lot of additional information on this stage as they are usually already amidst it, or have already surpassed it.
      What's special about this stage is the "aha experience" when realising that it's possible to play online poker profitably by playing fewer hands and sticking to some basic guidelines.

      First of all, a beginner is provided with static ranges and sample charts for pre and post-flop play.
      Simple guidelines like that ensure that fewer mistakes occur, resulting in a higher probability for success.

      A new driver doesn't start his first driving lesson in a Formula 1 racing car, but rather in a standard car in order to make the first steps as easy as possible.

      What's the difference to the preceding stage?
      In this case, the preceding stage was playing as a recreational player.
      A recreational player is an online poker player that doesn't play with any strategy, thereby making more mistakes than a beginner in stage 1.
      Therefore, we will be able to win money from these players on lower limits.

      Why is this stage important?
      Without stage 1 you won't have a solid starting point in a sport you won't automatically get better in just because you're doing it all the time.

      A recreational football player who's playing the game every weekend with his friends without any particular training will be better than someone who only plays twice a year.
      A poker player who plays poker every week without dealing with any sort of strategy won't learn a lot, staying on the same level as someone who plays less frequently while also not studying any sort of strategy.

      The fact that you won't get better at poker by simply playing shows how complex this game really is and why beginners with a strategic approach have the opportunity to win money.

      Further links for stage 1:
      The first lesson of this beginners' course is just what the doctor ordered for this stage:

      • First lesson of the beginners' course - Forum article | • First lesson of the beginners' course - Video

      Stage 2 - Basic concepts and thinking in ranges



      Link to the overview page

      What's special about this stage?
      This is a stage that the beginner interested in this course has tackled already!
      Topics like odds & outs, implied odds, position, playability etc. are no alien concepts for advanced beginners taking part in this course.

      What's special about this stage is that players start to realise that you have to think for yourself when it comes to poker.
      The further you advance, the more complex the game will be. Sample charts and standard playing styles have to be reconsidered and any situation has to be evaluated on its own.

      What's the difference to the preceding stage?
      In the preceding stage players are only focused on their own hand and on what they themselves are doing at the table.
      In the second stage we start to think about which hands our opponent could be holding. Furthermore, we try to find out the reasoning behind their moves and how to best exploit and use against them.

      Why is this stage important?
      If you don't start thinking about the reasoning behind your opponent's moves and with which hands he conducts them, your development as a poker player will stagnate.
      From NL10 onwards there will be more and more players at the table that will try to think in ranges and try to outplay us. We always have to be one step ahead of these players.

      Further links for stage 2:
      There is a lot of additional information on the relevant topics of this stage. You can find everything you'll need in the strategy section of PokerStrategy.com.

      Strategy section of PokerStrategy.com

      Here's a short list of some of the most important articles on basic poker mathematics that you should read.
      Odds & Outs
      Implied Odds

      After getting accustomed to odds & outs, the next topic on your study list should be equity and related concepts:
      Introduction to Ranges
      Combos & Card Removal
      Introduction to Equity


      Stage 3 - Hand reading and exploits



      Link to the overview page

      What's special about this stage?
      The main factor of successfully playing poker is the analysis and exploitation of weaknesses in your opponent's game. Analysing your opponent's style of play is called hand reading. Using information that you're gaining from it against your opponent is called exploiting.

      What's special about this stage is that we're increasing our focus on winning money from solid players at our table as well as just recreational players.
      In the end, everyone makes mistakes and it's up to us to notice and exploit them!

      What's the difference to the preceding stage?
      Players in stage 3 should already be familiar with stats displayed by tracking tools like PokerTracker 4 or Hold'em Manager 2 and know how to use them, meaning we have specific information on our opponents that we can use against them.
      We don't just think about which hands our opponent could be holding in a given spot, we also start trying to categorise our opponent from a general point of view:
      • Which kind of player is our opponent?
      • How does he play against different types of players?
      • How does he play against me specifically?

      Another decisive aspect of this stage are notes that we take on our opponents.
      Of course, taking notes on special moves you've seen from your opponents should be done as early as possible (even on NL2 already). However, only from stage 3 onwards are players usually able to use these notes to their advantage.

      Why is this stage important?
      Certain moves or general playing styles of opponents can be easily exploited, thereby enabling you to auto-profit.
      Auto-profit is an exploit with which you can take advantage of a too high folding frequency.

      Example:
      Your opponent folds 80% against 3-bets.
      When 3-betting to three times the initial raise size, you'll only need 66% fold equity in order to make this a profitable move. So if your opponent folds 80% against 3-bets, you can bluff 3-bet against him with any hand and it would still be a profitable play every single time.
      Further links for stage 3:
      Again, some links to relevant articles for this stage.

      Regarding the topic of hand reading the following articles are recommended:
      The Five Player Types
      The Average Range
      Four Tips for Successful Hand Reading

      After getting your teeth into the topic of hand reading, you should focus on exploits:
      Auto-Profit
      Thin Value Betting


      Stage 4 - Playing with an adaptive game plan



      Link to the overview page

      What's special about this stage?
      The next step in the evolution of a poker player is planning your entire range in any given situation.

      What's special about this stage is that you're trying to consider and incorporate all the other previous stages, thereby enabling you to already know by the flop what you're going to do against different types of opponents.

      What's the difference to the preceding stage?
      In the previous stages, we've focused on very particular aspects of our own game or the game of our opponent.
      Stage 4 is characterised by trying to create increasingly fluid crossovers in your own train of thought. It's the stage at which level thinking begins, for instance "I'm assuming my opponent thinks this and that, therefore I will do the following."

      Why is this stage important?
      Planning your own game helps you to notice more frequency-based leaks in your opponent's game, enabling you to shape your ranges in a way that you'll always end up with the right range in the right situation.

      When playing against proficient players, you shouldn't just focus on exploiting their mistakes anymore. You should also try to remove any mistakes in your own game, thereby preventing your opponent from exploiting them.

      Further links for stage 4:
      PokerStrategy.com also offers a lot of great articles on relevant topics regarding stage 4. Make sure you've read and studied all of them when reaching this stage in your career.

      The single most important article for this stage is the one focusing on "game plan":
      Game Plan (1): Introduction
    • confidant91
      confidant91
      Coach
      Coach
      Joined: 02.04.2011 Posts: 5,616
      This article refers to lesson 1 of the beginners' course:
      Beginners' course - Lesson 1

      Lesson 6: 13/03/2015 Adjustments to the beginner strategy - Pre-flop.
      Recorded coaching lesson 6

      In this lesson we will show how a beginner can improve his game and develop an advanced beginner strategy.

      You will learn ...
      • ... what to take into account regarding an advanced beginner strategy.
      • ... how to optimise your pre-flop play.
      • MP2 adaption
      • MP3/CO adaption
      • BU/SB adaption
      • BB adaption
      • "Multi-way suited connector calls"
      • Call on "top pair value"


      What you should take into account regarding an advanced beginner strategy
      The more advanced the strategy, the more difficult it is to specify it through predetermined ranges, sample charts and standardised playing styles.

      Every player has to judge for himself when and how to play and take responsibility for determining whether his playing style will be most profitable in the long run or not.

      Therefore, this article won't present any more sample charts or ranges. Instead you will be shown how to start thinking about spots and how to further improve your game on your own.


      How you can optimise your game pre-flop
      General note:
      Observe your table, pay attention to players who are still to act after it's been your turn and write down notes on things that you've noticed.

      Examples for possible observations
      Your raises are often answered with a 3-bet:
      If you realise that your opponents frequently 3-bet your raises, meaning raising again, then you should consider which hands are appropriate to continue with against these 3-bets.

      Does it still make sense to raise with smaller pairs when you have to give them up against a 3-bet anyway? Should you rather just raise hands like AQ with which you could continue playing against a 3-bet for top pair value?

      Your raises are frequently called by a lot of players
      If you're constantly up against 3 or 4 callers on the flop although you've raised first-in to 3-4 big blinds, then you should consider increasing your raise size for stronger hands to 4-5 big blinds.

      Players who constantly just call raises are often recreational players not following any particular strategy. Most of the time you will still have a better hand when playing against them, even when increasing your raise size.


      MP2 adaption



      The first position at a short-handed table can be played very differently, either tight or very loose. The reason is that there are 5 more players still to act behind you and the dynamic at a short-handed table can vary much more in comparison to a full-ring table.

      What can I change?
      As said before, you should definitely try to adapt to the players behind you and the dynamic at the table. A good initial approach is to differentiate between tight and loose tables in general.

      Example: When raising from MP2 you often only get the blinds or a single caller.

      This would be a good table for playing more hands. Depending on how comfortable you feel, increasing your range to hands like ATs/ATo/KJs/KTs/QJs is recommendable.


      MP3, CO adaption



      In this case, we're combining two positions. When you're first-in in the CO, you're always in a typical steal spot. That's not the case for MP3.

      Therefore, it definitely makes sense to try stealing and raising more hands in the CO than in MP3, given that the BU is not really an active player.

      What can I change?
      When in the CO, you should try to extend the sample chart logically, thereby attempting more steals.

      If other players limped before it was your turn, you don't really want to raise hands like 67s from the CO. However, if everyone folded, that hand is almost always strong enough to steal with.

      The same goes for A9o. When allowed to raise ATo even when there limpers are in the pot, it's just logical that you can also try and steal with A9o in the CO, given that everyone before you has folded.

      Again it is important to take into account the current dynamic at your table. If you know that the players behind you are playing loose and like to 3-bet, it is definitely not forbidden to play tighter than suggested in MP3.


      BU, SB adaption



      Especially on NL2 to NL5 these are the positions where the chart is really close to the optimum. However, even in this case you shouldn't forget that different types of opponents require different ranges.

      Without any particular information or observation on the players behind you, there's no reason to deviate from the chart.

      Playing looser than suggested by the chart in BU/SB is almost never recommendable since the chart itself is already based on a loose approach. Of course, you wouldn't want to play T7o against very loose opponents in the blinds.

      What can I change?
      Pay attention and adapt!

      If your opponents frequently react with a fold, then simply continue stealing. If the SB/BB is playing very loose, either by cold-calling or 3-betting a lot, you should stop stealing and just fold with T7o/J7o/Q7o and similar hands.

      If you realise that the BB has re-stolen more than 4 times against you, meaning 3-betting your steal raise, then even KQ is certainly strong enough in order to call his re-steal and play a possible top pair in that 3-bet pot like a monster.

      However, always keep in mind that you shouldn't make adjustments like that whenever you are unsure about an opponent.

      Hand discussions are the perfect way to check whether you've played and adapted correctly against certain opponents or not.


      BB adaption



      In this case, it's important that you don't start weird re-stealing moves, meaning to 3-bet your opponents' steals with any possible hand.

      Re-stealing as a bluff usually just make sense when you're playing with stats from software tools like Hold'em Manager 2 or PokerTracker 4. Since beginners shouldn't use these tools though, we are playing without stats and consequently without bluff re-steals.

      What can I change?
      You should always feel comfortable at your table.

      If you're not comfortable with raising KTo against two limpers in MP2/MP3, that's definitely understandable. In such a case, don't raise and instead simply check when in the BB. Obviously, it's much easier to play against one opponent. So if you're more comfortable with raising KTo against a single limper, simply do so.

      Against players who frequently steal and attack the blinds when in CO/BU/SB, you should consider also including hands like KQ/AJ/ATs in your calling range, playing these hands just like AQ.


      [size=18][B]Remarks regarding CO/BU[/b][/size]
      Whenever you are in the last two positions in which you can play hands in position, it makes sense to start with so-called "top pair value calls" and "multi-way suited connector calls".

      Multi-way suited connector calls
      [i]What does it mean?[/I]
      Multi-way means that you're up against more than one opponent. Typical suited connectors are hands from 45s to QJs (for example 7:heart: 8:heart: ).

      If you are holding such a suited connector in CO or BU, you can start calling in order to hit a post-flop monster whenever there was a raise not bigger than 4BB in front of you and at least one more player calling this raise as well.

      This way you will be up against at least two opponents on the flop, increasing the probability to get paid off in case you are able to hit your monster.

      With which hands can I do that?
      Any suited connector from 45s to QJs

      What do I have to take into account?
      • Don't make this move in MP2 or MP3!
      • Only do it with the presented suited connectors!
      • Only call when the raise is not bigger than 4BB!
      • Only call when at least one more player has called that raise as well!
      • Only call when both opponents have at least 50BB in their stacks!

      How do I continue with such a hand post-flop?
      When it comes to playing suited connectors post-flop, simply stick to "Step 2.2: You've only called before the flop" in Lesson 2 of this beginners' course.

      Special rule for suited ace-high hands
      With suited ace-high hands like A:heart: 2:heart: you can basically play the same way as with suited connectors but you should only call with them when in the BU and when there is one raiser and two(!) more callers in front of you since the playability of these hands is a bit worse.

      Top pair value calls
      What does it mean?
      According to our sample chart, if you're holding a strong hand like AQ, you should fold it in CO or BU whenever there was a raise in front of you. However, most of the time you almost always have a better hand than the raiser.

      If you now start calling instead of folding with hands like AQ, you're gaining the advantage that your opponent will almost always continuation bet a favourable flop for you (A:diamond: T:club: 2:spade: ), even as a bluff.

      On the other hand, he will often play check/fold on unfavourable flops like 3:heart: 6:heart: T :club: , again leading to you to profit from it.

      With which hands can I do that?
      The more hands your opponent raises, the more hands you can call with for top pair value.

      Usually, it should, however, be limited to hands like AQ/AJ/KQ since weaker hands lack the advantage in strength against the opponent's range.

      What do I have to take into account?
      Opponents that raise from MP2 have less hands in their range and tend to play tighter and more careful than players raising from MP3 or CO.

      Therefore, it is recommended for beginners to only call with AQ against raisers in MP2 as long as you can't be sure that the player in MP2 has a looser raising range which enables you to call with AJ/KQ or even weaker hands on top value.

      How do I continue with these hands post-flop?
      When it comes to playing suited connectors post-flop, simply stick to "Step 2.2: You've only called before the flop" in Lesson 2 of this beginners' course.
    • Zeldyman
      Zeldyman
      Gold
      Joined: 11.01.2010 Posts: 1,007
      Of course mate, but I think I can't make it tonight. Gonna wait for the replay anyway... :f_thumbsup:
    • adeee3
      adeee3
      Bronze
      Joined: 12.05.2009 Posts: 377
      I'm so curious :D
    • Post removed

    • confidant91
      confidant91
      Coach
      Coach
      Joined: 02.04.2011 Posts: 5,616
      Thx for a great activity during the first coaching. U should all go agian through the topics we discussed tonight so u are ready for others next time :)

      The most active guys of tonights coaching:

      Lathardi
      Lostmysoul
      StVatle
      Rightmove

      Hope i havent missed somebody that was really active, but if i did just be active again next time and u will win :)

      And the winner of 5 hand evaluations for this weeks is: Lostmysoul



      Lostmysoul contact me if u dont know how to post hands or if u have any other question about your prize. Otherwise feel free to post 5 hands here for evaluations durign this week.

      Rest of u feel free to ask any question about the coaching course or theroy that we did tonight.
    • Lathdari
      Lathdari
      Bronze
      Joined: 07.10.2014 Posts: 202
      Hi, thanks for the coaching yesterday.

      I'm worried about resteals. We're raising with 45.4% of hands from BU and SB where there is no action before us. If there is a reraise from BB, we're continuing only with the red hands, which are 2.6% of hands. That means we fold our steals 94.3% of the time and it is easily profitable for BB to resteal with any 2.

      Conversely, we ourselves only defend our blind with 11.0% of hands, and we're usually doing so passively (i.e. by calling). If poker is a game of stealing blinds, as you say, surely we need to be more active in defending our own blind?
    • confidant91
      confidant91
      Coach
      Coach
      Joined: 02.04.2011 Posts: 5,616
      Yeah definitely true. This course is for guys that are complete beginners so thats why we dont bother about those leaks. We will focus on them later on or u can always study those things in another more advanced materials. You can start with W34z3l's 6-max Walkthrough or some other videos as well :) Wish u gl at the tables and hope to see u on future coachigns as well!
    • Matorzinho
      Matorzinho
      Bronze
      Joined: 24.05.2013 Posts: 114
      Looking forward the day you get to a bit more advanced material :)

      I will keep an eye on this thread, your work looks great, keep it up!
    • confidant91
      confidant91
      Coach
      Coach
      Joined: 02.04.2011 Posts: 5,616
      Thx, no worries we will get to it, meanwhile you can follow more advanced coachings from other coaches.
    • confidant91
      confidant91
      Coach
      Coach
      Joined: 02.04.2011 Posts: 5,616
      video recording of first lesson is already online!

      http://www.pokerstrategy.com/video/36884/
    • confidant91
      confidant91
      Coach
      Coach
      Joined: 02.04.2011 Posts: 5,616
      Wanna get to know me better? Join our Community show with Lemon! http://cs.pokerstrategy.com/coaching/
    • FlyingDutchm1n
      FlyingDutchm1n
      Bronze
      Joined: 21.08.2012 Posts: 437
      HI Confidant91, just 2 remarks. The picture displaying the different positions is wrong, it goes from UTG straight to UTG+2 instead of UTG+1. The other thing I wanted to ask you I was a bit confused about, you mention green hands are like the weakest and blue hands are generally stronger. BUT, how can pocket 77s to pocket 22s be BLUE when MP2 but GREEN when in later position like MP3 or BTN? Why would 77s be WEAKER on the BU than on MP2 makes absolutely no sense to me, should be relatively stronger as you have position and the relative handstrength should definitely not go down imo...hope you can answer, thanks
    • confidant91
      confidant91
      Coach
      Coach
      Joined: 02.04.2011 Posts: 5,616
      FlyingDutchm1n: Good point that there is a mistake on that picture, luckily it is not a big deal for our course, but still thx and if u find any other mistake feel free to point that out again.

      About pps. You are write that the hand strenght of pps is probably little bit higher from later positions. The reason why they are blue from mp2 is that there cannot be any limper or any action in front of us so there was a no need to create green range for that position. Howerever on later positions there can be some action before us so therefore we had to create green range to show you which hands you should not raise for example versus a limper. Hope it make sense, if u have any other question feel free to ask.

      Hope that you all went trough the first lesson again so tomorrow we can continue with postflop play.

      Gl at the tables and see you tomorrow!
    • Goosen
      Goosen
      Bronze
      Joined: 17.08.2009 Posts: 21
      What time will the Post Flop content from todays Coaching be posted ?

      So that we can read it before the coaching so that we are more prepared.
      Or do you post it as soon as the coaching starts ?

      I have to say I missed the first coaching and watched the Video, I learned alot and will be joining the coaching tonight.

      Keep up the good work.

      Robin.