Quiz of the Week: Raised Pot without Initiative

    • awishformore
      awishformore
      Bronze
      Joined: 16.06.2007 Posts: 922
      Hello fellow PokerStrategists!

      At the very beginning of our poker career, we will usually be the one with initiative as we go to the flop. As we progress, we will start to open up our game and call raises more often, though.

      Initially, this approach will be limited to pocket pairs where we hope to hit a set. Post-flop play will be easy as we usually don't have much of a hand n case we miss.

      Things start becoming more complicated as we start opening up our ranges, though. We might find ourselves in situations where we played a suited connector and have to make a decision with some kind of draw on the flop.

      The game also becomes less straight forward if we have an overpair - and possibly an additional draw - with a small pocket pair.

      All things considered, the kind of spots we face when cold-calling an opponent's raise are a delicate matter and they are an important aspect to master as a progressing poker player.

      How well do you manage these situations?


  • 1 reply
    • ImAnAcehole9
      ImAnAcehole9
      Bronze
      Joined: 16.10.2009 Posts: 128
      Question 5:

      Preflop: Hero is BU with 7 :heart: 7 :club:
      CO raises 4BB, Hero calls 4BB

      Flop: 4 :diamond: , 6 :club: , 8 :heart:
      CO bets 6BB, Hero…


      a) call (3 Points)
      b) fold (0 Points)
      c) raise (1 Points)



      Your answer c) raise (1 Points)


      a) Folding would be a really bad choice here. You have an okish made hand and especially against the CO, you will often be able to win the showdown. A 5 or 7 on the turn will usually give you the best hand, too, so you have a combination of a hand with showdown value and a weak draw. You can't really fold against this opponent in position. Raising on the other hand doesn't make too much sense, either. Weaker hands will often fold and they usually don't have too many outs either. You would also find yourself in an ugly spot in case the opponent decided to raise again.

      In that case, you would be behind in almost all cases, but you would still have a shot at taking down the pot. A call is the best option here; first of all, it gets you to showdown cheaper and second, you can't be raised off your outs in case you are behind.


      A flat call would look like there is nothing to protect lets say a set. On a board like that, if you're representing any hand after calling a raise, it's a set. Why would you you flat call a bet on the flop with a gutshot? Represent a set and reraise. Villain is folding A K, A Q in most situations to the reraise and a move over the top from Villain results in a fold IMO.


      Question 10:

      Preflop: Hero is BU with 8 :spade: 7 :spade:
      UTG1 raises 4BB, MP1 calls 4BB, CO calls 4BB, Hero calls 4BB, BB calls 3BB

      Flop: 6 :spade: , 2 :diamond: , T :heart:

      We already know this hand up to this points. Let's see how it unfolded.

      BB checks, UTG1 checks, MP1 checks, Hero checks

      Turn: 3
      BB bets 14BB, UTG1 fold, MP1 folds, CO folds, Hero calls 14BB


      River: K :spade:
      BB bets 30BB, Hero…

      a) Call - your opponent often has a higher flush here, so a raise doesn't make sense. You are still ahead often enough to call, though.

      b) Raise - your opponent will often be on a two-pair or set, so he will be behind more often than he is ahead when he calls your raise.


      a) (0 Points)
      b) (1 Points)



      Your answer a) (0 Points)

      So we raise this? Why? We risk far more by raising this on the river than we have to gain. Villain should 90% of the time fold as your example stated his 2 pair in this situation so why bet? Flat calling you see his hole cards (information) and although unlikely Villain could have triple barrelled with A Q / A J spades due to the flat calls/chasing going on.

      I'm posting this for someone to put me straight, not because I think I'm a know it all :f_p: