Operation Ace of Clubs - Poker PRO by Dec. 2011 Business Venture

    • blackops888
      blackops888
      Bronze
      Joined: 25.04.2010 Posts: 502
      Who the hell are you?

      Real name: Alysson Gomes
      Location: Curitiba, Brazil
      Age: 25
      Ocupation: Department manager on an events and promotions company.

      I don't think I've got a lot to say about my life right now. Let's just say that I'm a 25 years old guy who's got tired of living on a paycheck and suddenly found in poker both a potential source of a lot of fun and high revenue in the long term. I'm willing to take a serious shot at poker and see where it leads me. I've been playing for a few months right now and got extremely involved with the game since the very first week. Technically I'm currently a Multimedia Production graduate student in Brazil, but I had to stop my studies on this semester due to a new job I have in an events and promotions company. The original plan was to come back next semester and have the life "dad & mom wanted me to have", but... I'm so damn tired of it.

      Two weeks ago I was able to move to a new house where I live with 4 good friends. This was a relief, actually. For the first time I had the sensation that I was floating in the air, without no real guarantees, having to make a living by myself... and really enjoyed it. This idea of becoming a poker pro was already growing in my mind, and from that moment on it seemed to get bigger and more real. When that happened I decided it was the time to give a serious shot at poker. That's what I'm intended to do, beginning in this very day.

      I am currently rolled at more or less $230 spread between Party Poker and Pokerstars. That's what I'm starting this journey with. First thing I'll do in this new venture is manage to clear a first deposit bonus on Party Poker. I have some $75 there and will play NL4 until I make the 50 party points I need to clear the bonus. As soon as I get there, I'll transfer my money to PokerStars and start playing at NL10. That's where the journey will really begin.

      Because of my dayjob, I'm currently available to play for 4 hours a day from Tuesday to Friday and for 6-8 hours a day on Saturdays and Sundays, on an average of 28 hours a week. This limited time is the only one I have right now to dedicate to poker until I reach the objectives I describe below. Once I get there, I'll be able to become a full-time poker player and go for 30-40 hours of poker a week. From that point on, all my energies are going to be directed to it... finally! :s_biggrin:


      If you just got to know this blog...

      First thing I have to say is... I am oriented towards value-expectation. I like to play poker as someone who runs a business, or, better yet, just like a stockbroker treats his bonds. This "value-expectation" thing is a term I made up (or at least I think I made up) to explain something I consider one step above being "results-oriented". I don't know why, but I've seen people talking about being results-oriented as something bad. They may not even say that directly, but they definetely treat it as an inconvenient approach to the game. I saw coaches behave like that on PS videos, and I think it is OK. As far as I could see, people who are results-oriented will sometimes let go +EV situations because they are afraid of losing what they've already got. In general, they will evaluate a move in relation to the size of the damage that could be caused in case of a loss, instead of the profit margins involved. At least that's what I noticed on people who behave like that.

      Being oriented towards value-expectation is different. It means one can play based on the edge a certain wager offers and step into it or not by deciding whether it is gonna be worthy investing some money. It doesn't matter how much it is gonna cost in actual money (once we follow strict BRM rules that keep us safe whenever variance hits). What matters is the edge offered by the situation. That's what happens in the stock market. The only difference is that our "stock" is ruled by some hand we are playing, instead of a share on some company's assets. In practical terms, being oriented towards value-expectation requires focus on playing our equity accordingly and, most of all, in investing money (AKA "betting") on circumstances which offer a measurable profit margin (AKA "+EV plays").

      I run my poker like a business and it may not look too fancy to some people, but this is the way I can give my best to it. The objective here is making money, and in order to make money we need to have adequate skill and discipline. By making money I enjoy playing poker. When I lose money, I don't like playing poker. If poker was a free game (no money involved) I'd rather spend my free time playing Call of Duty (which is very nice, by the way). Pure and simple. It is a business to me, and every business has to generate profit. I have obtained this kind of mindset by reading a book called "Treat your Poker like a Business", from a guy named Dusty Schmidt. The stuff he wrote on that book simply stuck me right between the eyes. No exageration. It was as if his text finally made that bridge between the managing skills I apply on my day job as a department leader and my recently acquired poker skills. It was a relief, actually, as I was struggling for being so analytical on my game at the same time I saw people being so careless about their performance making even more than me. Maybe by findig someone who thought about poker just like me, I also found a safe heaven for my style. We all have to agree that there is not a lot of material that treats poker from the perspective from which a real business should be treated, but instead as an advanced game of skill and long-term money making. And there are huge differences between these perspectives.

      Just like every business has a plan, we also have a plan for our poker business venture. The business plan here consists in achieving a series of goals that will finally let me step into poker as a professional, which means I will be able to play poker and cash-out the money I need to live without having to jeopardize my bankroll. After reaching "pro status" a fresh new business plan will be implemented from that point.

      The goals I need to achieve, in accordance to my experience in poker up to now and the money I require to make a living as a 25 year-old single guy in Brazil are expressed in the following minimum requirements. All of them are very realistic and I do think I can achieve them:

      1. Having built a $2500 bankroll for the NL100 games until December 2011. I'll advance up in limits with a 20 buy-in rule until NL50 and will stick to 25 buy-ins from NL100 on.

      2. At least R$4000,00 (app. $2250) on the bank as a safety fund. I can manage to save R$500,00/month on my day job paycheck, starting on October 2010 until December 2011.

      3. After quitting my day job, I'll need a minimum of $2500/month SOLID winnings, so I can cash out $500/month for myself in the begining. It means achieving the following minimum results (which are realistic, without building castles in the air). I CANNOT quit my job before being able to achieve these minimum results in the moment I "convert" to full-time poker player:

      50k hands/month on NL100, by playing at least 5.5 hours/day (5 days a week) on 6 SH tables (app. 480 hands/hour) @ 5BB/100. It will be the minimum I need to win $2500 a month on NL100.

      It's the minimum, of course. If I get to manage 10 tables instead of 6 while keeping the same win rate, great. If I get to play for 8 hours instead of 5.5, even better. If I increase my win rate from 5BB/100 to 8BB/100, outstanding. One step at a time.

      Even if I reach that $2500 bankroll for NL100 and those R$4000 savings, I will not quit my day job if I don't fulfill these metrics.

      These are the metrics to watch for. First things first, top priority metrics is going to be "Hours Played", as it is the only 100% controlable variable in the plan. People say we can manage to improve winning rates, BB/100, $/hour, etc, and that's true, but these rates are all equally subject to both luck and variance factors. The only thing that someone can be completely sure that will be under his/her total control is the "Hours Played" factor. By commiting to the effort of playing X hours a day, without failing it, is the way that we can make "the edge" manifest itself.

      Have you ever wondered what this "edge" might be all about? It is a thin margin, most of the time. Let's say you can win 55% of the hands you play but end up losing 45% of them. It means you've got a 10% profit margin to work with. Would this profit margin generate considerable profit in case you don't play enough? No way. That said, the commitment to the effort of playing for X hours a day or month is paramount to the plan, once it is what makes possible for our "edge" to manifest itself as a bankroll increase in the long-run.

      The long-run is longer than you think. Never forget (which is the same as... always remember.)

      The second metrics is gonna be $/hour, once it is an indicative of in which direction my effort is going. It can only indicate up or down. The advantage of sticking to it is that it is less vulnerable to fluctuations than BB/100, especially when an increment in the number of simultaneous tables is made.

      Finnaly, the objectives of this blog are to (1) help me keep track of my progress and make "accountability" as I go through this endeavour. This accountability thing is important to me, once exposing my results to the community will give me feedback from fellow players and will constantly remember me about the pursuit of my goals. And (2) it will hopefully serve as inspiration and example for other people who would like to become poker pros, so that they can both incorporate part of my methods in their game and also avoid repeating my mistakes in their own journey.

      I commit to post the most critical hand of my last session every day, as well as a graph and self-anaylis of the last seven days every Sunday and all kinds of trash talk I come up with during the week.

      And by the way... I like jazz a lot and I'm always listening to it while playing so... I'll embed some nice YouTube videos here from time to time. :s_cool: :club:
  • 30 replies
    • blackops888
      blackops888
      Bronze
      Joined: 25.04.2010 Posts: 502
      And here we go!

      Today's session is gonna happen on Party Poker and I'll play 4-6 tables @ NL4 until I get 50 more party points. By doing this I'll be able to clear a bonus I have there and transfer whatever I got to PokerStars, where I'll start on NL10.

      I'll post a graph tomorrow, as well as a critical hand for evaluation.

      But until then.......... as I like jazz A LOT and can't avoid listening to it while on the tables....... I'll leave you with Mr. Miles Davis:

    • lennonac
      lennonac
      Global
      Joined: 02.05.2009 Posts: 1,421
      Good luck, all sounds good except I think you should have 50 buyins for a limit when you turn pro at the very minimum.
      The pressure of having to make x amount each month is immense and after losing 5 buyins in a small downswing you only have 20 buyins left. That will be really hard to handle.

      Everything else though sounds well thought out.
    • blackops888
      blackops888
      Bronze
      Joined: 25.04.2010 Posts: 502
      Originally posted by lennonac
      Good luck, all sounds good except I think you should have 50 buyins for a limit when you turn pro at the very minimum.
      The pressure of having to make x amount each month is immense and after losing 5 buyins in a small downswing you only have 20 buyins left. That will be really hard to handle.

      Everything else though sounds well thought out.
      Yes indeed. Sounds like a reasonable advice. Maybe I could try to make it to NL200 before going PRO and move down to NL100 when I decide to go pro at last, you got it? This way I can move up faster until I get there and then begin this pro stuff with a nice BR to back me up.

      Thanks for the advice!
    • blackops888
      blackops888
      Bronze
      Joined: 25.04.2010 Posts: 502
      So here we go with yesterday's session weird hand. Villain was a 24/9/2.2 guy with 22% WTSD.

      I feel quite bluffed on this hand :s_confused:

      Maybe villain hit his two pair? KJ may be in his BU calling range, as well as KQ. I don't see people bluff-raising a lead on the river so often.

      Party, $0.02/$0.04 NL Hold'em Cash Game, 6 Players
      LeggoPoker.com - Hand History Converter

      BB: $10.58
      Hero (UTG): $7.15
      MP: $4
      CO: $2.09
      BTN: $5.16
      SB: $6.58

      Pre-Flop: T:spade: K:spade: dealt to Hero (UTG)
      Hero raises to $0.12, MP calls $0.12, CO folds, BTN calls $0.12, 2 folds

      Flop: ($0.42) 4:heart: 4:spade: 2:heart: (3 Players)
      Hero checks, MP checks, BTN checks

      Turn: ($0.42) K:diamond: (3 Players)
      Hero checks, MP bets $0.28, BTN folds, Hero calls $0.28

      River: ($0.98) J:diamond: (2 Players)
      Hero bets $0.47, MP raises to $1.17, Hero folds

      Results: $1.92 Pot
      MP showed and WON $2.53 (+$1.66 NET)
    • blackops888
      blackops888
      Bronze
      Joined: 25.04.2010 Posts: 502
      Well... today's session sucked a**. My mother came home tonight and payed a visit. I spent some of my poker tme with her and played for just 1.5 hours, making a little over $1.5 on NL4. It's always better than leaving in the red, tough.

      I have made a commitment to myself to play for 4 hours a day and have not been able to do that this week. I'll get back to Party Poker this weekend and grind two sessions of 3 hours each in 6 tables on both days. I want to make up for the time I wasnt able to apply to the tables.
    • blackops888
      blackops888
      Bronze
      Joined: 25.04.2010 Posts: 502
      Operation Ace of Clubs Week #1 Debriefing

      Not bad, uhn? Considering that the week began on Thursday for me, I really think I had nice results. :s_cool:

      I'll play for more 6 hours today, but that is gonna come in next week's graph. I'm very satisfied with my overall results, but I'm also definetely looking forward to increase my 3-betting percentage from 5.6% to something around 9% this week.


      NL4 BSS SH on Party Poker
      Uploaded with ImageShack.us
    • blackops888
      blackops888
      Bronze
      Joined: 25.04.2010 Posts: 502
      I'm looking for new spots to pull this kind of trigger again. Villain was a 29/19/3.0 agressive regular with 193 hands on my HM already. He had a 18% frequency for SB raise vs steal. I had some history on him running over the table with pure agression earlier.

      My reasoning was simple: He could not have a lot of strong jacks in his SB calling range. For some reason, I thought he was just trying to level me. When the board came like that, I thought that even if he had a strong J he would not willing to go broke with it. After he leaded and called my raise, I thought he maybe had the Ace of spades and was trying to hit that flush anyway, even without the odds. When the 5h hit, I had anything else to do but shove. He could not call that too often. Even a set would have had a tough time calling that shove.

      It worked :f_cool:


      Party, $0.02/$0.04 NL Hold'em Cash Game, 6 Players
      LeggoPoker.com - Hand History Converter

      BTN: $4.31
      SB: $4.04
      BB: $4.82
      UTG: $2.89
      Hero (MP): $3.94
      CO: $10.75

      Pre-Flop: A:diamond: Q:club: dealt to Hero (MP)
      UTG folds, Hero raises to $0.12, 2 folds, SB raises to $0.36, BB folds, Hero calls $0.24

      Flop: ($0.76) 2:spade: J:spade: 9:spade: (2 Players)
      SB bets $0.56, Hero raises to $1.20, SB calls $0.64

      Turn: ($3.16) 5:heart: (2 Players)
      SB checks, Hero bets $2.38 and is All-In, SB folds

      Results: $3.16 Pot
      Hero showed A:diamond: Q:club: and WON $5.39 (+$3.83 NET)
    • blackops888
      blackops888
      Bronze
      Joined: 25.04.2010 Posts: 502
      I'd like to make this blog useful for those who read, instead of just filling it with trash talk. This way, I'm about to finish a short article called "Exploiting regulars with pre-flop 3-bets" tonight and will post it fast as possible. Followed by that I'll challenge myself with a new section on this blog, called "Improvement Opportunity of the Week".

      It's gonna be a nice thing to focus the improvements in my game. I hope you guys can do the same when you read it. :s_biggrin:
    • jbpatzer
      jbpatzer
      Bronze
      Joined: 22.11.2009 Posts: 6,944
      Originally posted by blackops888
      I'd like to make this blog useful for those who read, instead of just filling it with trash talk.
      I think you just pointed out where I'm going wrong. :f_o:
    • blackops888
      blackops888
      Bronze
      Joined: 25.04.2010 Posts: 502
      Originally posted by jbpatzer
      Originally posted by blackops888
      I'd like to make this blog useful for those who read, instead of just filling it with trash talk.
      I think you just pointed out where I'm going wrong. :f_o:
      Well... I like your blog, man. It's kind of funny. :f_biggrin:

      But anyway... This poker business thing I talk about in my intro leads me to a very simple thought: time is money. I have to work all day long and can't afford reading a lot of non-improving stuff when I get back home. I think most people in PS are like that too.

      I can even read a lot of stuff on the forums during my lunch time at the company, but that's it. When I get back home, it's just the tables.
    • blackops888
      blackops888
      Bronze
      Joined: 25.04.2010 Posts: 502
      Exploiting out-of-the-line regulars with pre-flop 3-bets

      I was playing NL4 on Party Poker yesterday and had the idea of making a deeper analysis of this specific spot. In one of my tables I had a regular sitting on my right who was constantly isolating the fish before the action got to me, taking away the opportunity I could have of making the isolation raise myself. As expected, he was raising light and getting a lot of folds from the fish. Looking at all that, I thought: “Can I 3-bet bluff-raise this guy with air and still get a profit from it?”. I made a few fast calculations, 3-bet him with trash like 83o or K5o and got my folds, having some nice profits right on the spot and also establishing a table image that told him that he was not going to get too successful in running over the table while I was sitting there on his left. Nice results.

      Right… I leveled the guy, but this is not the intention. The point in this business is making money, and in that moment I felt that that guy was actually delivering money on my doorstep by isolating light like that. It's a profit opportunity floating in the "market" (AKA "table"), just waiting for someone to grab it. Taking all that into consideration, I took a pen and a piece of paper, began making a few hand range analysis as soon as I got a break on my dayjob this morning and came to some conclusions that might help the people in here, especially those who are just in the beginning (like me). Also, by writing all that in a consistent way I'll be able to crystallize this line of thought in my own game and make a more solid improvement for myself. That's what I call a win-win situation. :)

      - Initial considerations:

      It doesn't matter how much is at stake (the pot size), as long as things go "as they should be" (no insane 10BB open-raises by villain, no maniac-type players involved, etc). Consider the following pre-flop action in which we have position over a regular/loose-aggressive player:

      EP and MP fold, Regular raises 4BB from CO, Hero on BU...?

      There is a lot of combinatorics and probability analysis involved and I don't really think it would be good to develop all those numbers at once. For what reason? Because profit lies in the application alone, and what we need here are the general guidelines that we could use in order to make immediate profit by 3-betting regulars and loose-aggressives pre-flop. That's why we should stick to the essential math. There is no time to open the Equilator or draw numbers on a piece of paper when you have 10 tables running at once.

      The core of this 3-bet move lies in an accurate evaluation of villain's positional open-raising hand ranges. This evaluation consists of estimating which hand range a player will open a pot or isolate a limping fish with IN RELATION TO THE POSITION HE IS AT THE MOMENT. The best thing I've done with my HUD was setting up a new line for positional raise-1st (stats only. I have one line that is formed by 5 percentages: EP, MP, CO, BU and SB raise-1st. These stats show the distribution of a player's opening frequency through each position he occupied while we were able to collect his information on our database. If we know that over a reasonable sample of hands some specific regular has been opening pots from CO with a 23% frequency, we can also come up with a plan to make profit from that whenever we are sitting on BU or the blinds, for example. In fact, after making up "the plan" just a few times, we will actually be able to execute it by reflex and without further analysis even when multi-tabling. From then on, when proper judgment is established, profit will rise in the long-run as a few more BB/100.

      Let's establish three hand ranges form which we are able to begin. This first analysis will assume we are holding pure trash only (hands that won't have a lot of showdown equity, like J2, 83, K7, etc)

      These three ranges will be what I call "continuation ranges". These are the ranges with which villain is expected to continue playing the hand instead of hitting the muck - and he can continue either by calling our 3-bet or by 4-betting it. In both cases, as in our initial analysis we have anything but trash, we lost it (we'll either check-fold a flop if villain calls, or muck our hands if he 4-bets). It is important to understand that these three ranges are not meant to be understood as absolute ranges at all, but rather as simple rule-of-thumb ranges that we can use for fast calculations while multi-tabling. In this situation, we cannot afford the luxury of dedicating too much time to the evaluation of probabilities.

      - Range #1: "Unfoldable" range
      That's a nitty range. It consists of {JJ+, AK}, or about 3% of the hands. This one is obviously used by rocks and some scared-money guys, and lead more often to a shove than a call.

      - Range #2: Strong Range
      That's a decent continuation range for the use of ABC poker players. One cannot go too wrong by sticking to it as his continuation range. It consists of {TT+, AQo, AJs+, KQs}, or about 5% of the hands.

      - Range #3: Broad semi-strong Range
      That's a reasonable loose-aggressive continuation range. It's not so out-of-the-line, but still exploitable. It consists of {TT+, AT+, KJ+, QJs}, or about 10% of the hands.

      The reduction of our opponent's "continuation range" in these three categories will always be meant to simplify on-the-go calculations when we try to exploit people's looseness while multi-tabling. Of course there are a lot more ranges out there (all of them player-dependent), but we are not going too wrong when sticking to these three ranges, at least in the micro-stakes. Consider the following line for a 6-max game:

      EP folds, Villain open-raises 3BB from MP, CO folds, Hero raises 7.5BB from BU, Blinds fold, Villain...?

      That's a classical one. What should villain do in this spot? Shove, fold?

      These are the wrong questions. A better one should be "What CAN this guy do if I 3-bet him right in this spot?". That changes a lot, and I'll tell you why: It's a matter of what kind of readings we have on this guy. From that moment on, our concept of "continuation ranges" becomes crucial.

      Before anything else, let's estimate what kind of pot odds we are getting: (7.5)/(3 + 7.5 + 1 + 0.5) = 62%

      It means that if we are looking for immediate profit by 3-betting this opponent with pure trash (83O or J2s, for example), he has to fold to our move at least 62% of the time. That's our break-even EV limit.

      What do we do now that we have all these numbers? The solution is simple: We ask "What could be this guy's continuation range?". It really depends on our observation AT THE TABLE. There is just no way we can talk about it enough on an article. One has to learn to assess it by himself.

      Let's suppose we think our MP raiser would fold everything but the top 6% of the available hands. What could happen if our HUD gave us each the following MP open-raising frequencies?

      Villain open-raises MP with 30% frequency: That's an easy one. This guy is really out-of-the-line by opening so much. Mathematically, he cannot have that many premium hands to continue playing with against our 3-bet. He is folding (30% - 6%) / (30%) = 80% of his hands. Once we need him folding only 62% of his hands, our move has an immediate expected-value of 0.8x(3 + 1 + 0.5) - 0.2x7.5 = 3.6 - 1.5 = +2.1BB. It's a nice move, unless villain is well known for 4-bet bluffing a lot or calling out-of-position just to make moves post-flop.

      Villain open-raises MP with 22% frequency: Same thing. He is folding (22% - 6%) / (22%) = 72%. This is a bit close, but we still have a positive value-expectation on our move.

      Villain open-raises MP with 15% frequency: Now things change. Villain is only folding (15% - 6%) / (15%) = 60%. This is a close break-even situation. There is actually a tiny negative expectation for this move. We would not recommend doing this with pure air, but rather with a hand that still has some kind of equity once called.

      Villain open-raises MP with 10% frequency: This is a losing proposition. This guy is quite tight and will only fold (10% - 6%) / (10%) = 40%. It's a clearly -EV move when done with anything but trash. It requires a bit more post-flop equity to be even close to a profitable play.

      The same reasoning applies to the two other "continuation ranges" we assigned above. All we need to pay attention is to the proportion between what we think our opponent's continuation range is like and his actual open-raising frequency from that particular position; if this number leads to a folding frequency that is greater than our pot odds, we should pull the trigger.And as I just can't emphasize enough, these are simply rule-of-thumb ranges we can use for fast calculations when multi-tabling. Maybe someone would feel more confortable by assigning five ranges instead of three (even though fives ranges would be quite tough to accurately evaluate that fast).

      One more observation: We have just considered situations in which we are in position against our opponents. A similar line of thought would apply if we want to defend our blinds against a CO or BU raise. In this particular spot, especially the BU is opening a lot of hands from that position and will fold most of the time to our 3-bets. It's actually the same line of thought with a few more adaptations.

      That's it. Let's get to work. It seems quite easy to apply this move when in front of a simple mathematical explanation. One could say "Yeah... I'd obviously do that all day long and make nice profit out of it", but the application itself is a bit different. It requires a lot of trials and errors until we get to a balanced point.

      That said, just do it. Math is on your side and profit will show up in the long run, as long as you make the long-run long enough. Once you start this thing, do until the end. Good luck.
    • blackops888
      blackops888
      Bronze
      Joined: 25.04.2010 Posts: 502
      From now on we're gonna have in this blog a weekly challenge called "Improvement Opportunity of the Week". With this new section I'm intended to find some kind of "leak" and turn that into a strength and source of profit. :f_cool:

      Objectives will be described, as well as the method for tracking their success. See below.
    • blackops888
      blackops888
      Bronze
      Joined: 25.04.2010 Posts: 502
      Improvement Opportunity of the Week #1: Exploiting regulars with pre-flop 3-bets

      Step One: Identify the problem. What is happening?
      I've been struggling a lot with regulars who open-raise on a seemingly too high frequency from their positions. At the same time, I've noticed that they will often fold whenever I actually have a strong holding and 3-bet them. They fold a lot. That's the point.

      Step Two: Come up with a solution. What can be done? (What is your plan?)
      Getting more familiar with the exploitation of loose-aggressive regulars who open-raise pots a lot from their respective positions. In accordance with the method described in the above article, I can either 3-bet bluff with trash for immediate profit or 3-bet with hands that still have some showdown equity and can be played post-flop. It's essential to create the habit of pulling this trigger.

      Step Three: Make a plan and stick to it for long enough. What are you going to do about it and for how long?
      This one is gonna last for 3 weeks, with one report each Sunday.

      Step Four: Establish a metrics. How are you going to evaluate the effectiveness of your solution?
      I just need to apply a HM filter for pre-lop 3-bet = TRUE & saw flop = FALSE & period = last 7 days, as well as another one for pre-lop 3-bet = TRUE & period = last 7 days. This is gonna give me the immediate exploitation profit, as well as post-flop results.


      We need an effective method. That's all. Money is floating all around. :s_cool:
    • blackops888
      blackops888
      Bronze
      Joined: 25.04.2010 Posts: 502
      Should I fill this blog with more trash talk so people might start reading it?
    • ExternalUseOnly
      ExternalUseOnly
      Bronze
      Joined: 30.01.2010 Posts: 3,373
      Originally posted by blackops888
      Should I fill this blog with more trash talk so people might start reading it?
      Yes Deffo

      lol joke. Its alright from a poker point of view but when you just see a massive post it stops people (me) reading some of them when it could be quite interesting but i just cant make myself get to the interesting bits no offence just break it up with pics of boobs.
    • Kruppe
      Kruppe
      Black
      Joined: 20.02.2008 Posts: 2,144
      there's no such thing as pure air preflop, so even 'bluff' 3betting isn't a pure bluff, you still have equity when called, plus you can have (a varying amount of) poft-flop fold equity/bluff equity when your 3bet is called
    • blackops888
      blackops888
      Bronze
      Joined: 25.04.2010 Posts: 502
      Originally posted by Kruppe
      there's no such thing as pure air preflop, so even 'bluff' 3betting isn't a pure bluff, you still have equity when called, plus you can have (a varying amount of) poft-flop fold equity/bluff equity when your 3bet is called
      Completely agreed. But I'm just talking about immediate profit on pre-flop moves. Like I wrote, we consider our hand is done once called, just for the sake of explanation.
    • blackops888
      blackops888
      Bronze
      Joined: 25.04.2010 Posts: 502
      OVERKILL!

      My first Royal Flush EVER! :s_biggrin: :s_biggrin: :s_biggrin: :s_biggrin:


      Party, $0.02/$0.04 NL Hold'em Cash Game, 5 Players
      LeggoPoker.com - Hand History Converter

      CO: $5.91
      BTN: $4
      SB: $6.47
      Hero (BB): $4
      UTG: $4

      Pre-Flop: K:heart: A:heart: dealt to Hero (BB)
      3 folds, SB raises to $0.16, Hero raises to $0.44, SB raises to $1.42, Hero raises to $3.96 and is All-In, SB calls $2.56

      Flop: ($8) Q:heart: Q:spade: J:heart: (2 Players - 1 is All-In)

      Turn: ($8) 7:diamond: (2 Players - 1 is All-In)

      River: ($8) T:heart: (2 Players - 1 is All-In)

      Results: $8 Pot ($0.40 Rake)
      SB showed Q:diamond: K:diamond: and LOST (-$3.98 NET)
      Hero showed K:heart: A:heart: and WON $7.60 (+$3.64 NET)

      Guy floped trips... must have got PISSED! :s_o:
    • Kruppe
      Kruppe
      Black
      Joined: 20.02.2008 Posts: 2,144
      i understand what you're doing. but you don't C/F every streets on every board every time you bluff 3bet and are called
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